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Ernestine Friedl papers, circa 1950 - 2000 22.5 Linear Feet — 15000 Items

Ernestine Friedl served as chair of the Dept. of Anthropology and as Dean of Arts and Sciences and Trinity College at Duke University. She studied gender roles, rural life in modern Greece, and the Chippewa. The Ernestine Friedl papers include personal and professional correspondence, subject files, course materials, articles, reprints, field notes, and sound recordings related to her anthropological research and her roles as professor and administrator at Queens College and Duke University. English.

The Ernestine Friedl papers include personal and professional correspondence, subject files, course materials, articles, reprints, field notes, and sound recordings related to her anthropological research and her roles as professor and administrator at Queens College and Duke University.

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The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is the largest film festival in the United States entirely devoted to documentary film. Originally the DoubleTake Documentary Film Festival, it is an international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of non-fiction cinema, held annually since 1998 in downtown Durham, North Carolina. Typically, more than 100 films are screened, along with discussions, panels, and workshops fostering conversation between filmmakers, film professionals and the public. The Full Frame Archive was created in 2007, as a partnership between Duke University and Full Frame. The Full Frame Archive Film Collection comprises preservation masters of documentary films that won awards at the Full Frame Film Festival between 1998 and 2012. Formats include 35mm film, 16mm film, Digital Betacam cassette, HDCAM cassette, Betacam SP cassette, and DVD. In addition, there is a complete set of festival program books. The films vary widely in topic and style, with a predominant emphasis on human rights issues; all of the films deal with social issues in one way or another. The collection is organized chronologically, by festival year, and acquisitions are ongoing.

The Full Frame Archive comprises program material, publicity-related material, and preservation masters of award-winning documentary films at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival (formerly DoubleTake) between 1998 and 2017. Film formats include 35mm film, 16mm film, Digital Betacam cassette, HDCAM cassette, Betacam SP cassette, and DVD. In addition, the collection contains festival program books, postcards, movie posters, t-shirts, tote bags, advertisements, newspaper clippings, press releases, and newspaper inserts.

The collection is organized chronologically, by festival year. Each series in the collection includes all acquired award winners from one year and available program material, when available. Each subseries comprises all the elements for one documentary work.

Whenever possible, the film is preserved on 35mm film, a duplicate preservation master especially created for this collection; occasionally, the work was originally filmed on 35mm, but more often it was recorded digitally and then transferred to film for festival screenings and theatrical release. Many films were never transferred to film, and in those cases, the highest quality digital master has been preserved, usually on Digital Betacam cassette, cloned from the master provided by the filmmaker or production company; other digital formats are represented as well.

While all are documentary films, some may also be considered belonging to the genres of biographical nonfiction, ethnographic, ethnic nonfiction and music. Feature, short and animation forms are all represented. The films vary widely in topic and style, with a predominant emphasis on human rights issues. All of the films deal with social issues in one way or another, including topics such as gender; family relations; education; life cycles (childhood, aging, death, etc.); crime and justice; minority groups and discrimination; public health; humanitarian aid; technology and social life; migration; democracy; economic development; war and conflict; peace and healing; art and society; religion; rehabilitation; etc.

Competition for awards has always been international; though the majority of award-winners are from and about the United States, the collection is also notably strong on topics relating to Africa and the Middle East. Only films completed within one year of the festival were eligible for competition, thus all are contemporary to the festival date. The number and type of awards given at the Festival changed from year to year; thus, each year is represented by a different number of films, selected according to varying criteria.

The Full Frame Archive was begun in late 2007 and acquisitions are ongoing. The films are donated by the filmmaker and/or copyright holder. Although the intent is to eventually preserve every Full Frame award winner, this may not be possible, as some copyright holders may decline to donate their work.

These preservation masters are stored in a climate-controlled facility off-site and may not be viewed. For viewing purposes, DVD use copies are available, backed up by a DVD master, also stored off-site.

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The International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) is a non-profit organization that assists post-conflict, conflict, and democratic countries in pursuing accountability for mass atrocities and human rights abuses. The International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) Records include printed materials and publications, country files, staff files, audiovisual materials, and institutional and administrative materials.

The records of the International Center for Transitional Justice span the years 1918 to 2016, with the bulk of the materials from the late 20th and early 21st century. Gathered by staff at the ICTJ as a resource library, the files house publications from countries all over the world relating to peace processes and to the pursuit of legal reparations and reconciliation in areas of conflict involving human rights violations. Formats include annual reports, legal journals, human rights organization publications, a variety of reports and white papers, conference proceedings, newspapers, trial transcripts, as well as some posters and other ephemera.

There are four main series: Geographic Files, Reference and Reports, Program and Subject Files, and Administrative Files. The Geographic series contains materials from countries directly impacted by the work of ICTJ and its partners. It is arranged by continent and then by country. The Reference and Reports series is ICTJ's documentation library. The Program and Subject files contain thematically-arranged publications about ICTJ's main subject areas, such as transitional justice and reparations, as well as the programatic materials from ICTJ conferences, workshops, publications, truth commissions, and program divisions. The final series, administrative files, is largely comprised of the files of former ICTJ presidents Alex Boraine and Juan Mendez and other staff files. The staff files and the institutional memory files come together to form the narrative of the creation and work of ICTJ since its beginnings in 2001.

Within each series are audiovisual materials and digital files. These materials are inserted into the series they correspond with and cover formats including betamax tapes, mini-DVs, DVDs, CDs, VHS tapes, and cassette tapes. The audiovisual materials include trial recordings, staff interviews, conference recordings, and truth commission proceedings. Some of these were digitized by ICTJ staff. The born-digital records contain similar materials and also include training materials, ICTJ administrative materials, and program specific documents.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Me Too Monologues records, 2011-ongoing 10 Megabytes — 33 document files and 24 image files.

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Me Too Monologues is a testimonial theatre production featuring monologues about race, ethnicity, culture, gender, sexuality, and identity markers. Records include scripts, publicity, and production materials.

The collection contains scripts, publicity, and production materials related to the productions of Me Too Monologues on the campus of Duke university. Most records date from 2011-2014, with web captures of the group's website in 2015 and 2017-ongoing.