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Letters, reports, certificates of appointment, receipts, loans, and other documents pertaining to the Civil War and to the Lee family (accession#2000-353), and collected by Alfred and Elizabeth Brand. The Civil War Papers Series includes battle reports from Bull Run (1861), Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg; Confederate Army General Orders Nos. 9, 64, and 18; letters detailing the operation of the Confederate Army, outcomes of battles, and Confederate opinions about the Civil War and specific officers. Includes a broadside, "Rally Round the Flag, Boys!;" a transcription of an interview with Jefferson Davis by newspaper writer Augustus C. Buell (1876); a draft of the poem "The Conquered Banner" by the Rev. Abram J. Ryan (1865); two engravings (of Grant and Sherman); John H. Miller and M. French's obligation and oath of allegiance to Virginia and to the Confederate States of America (1862); and J. C. Winsmith's oath of allegiance to the USA and pardon from Andrew Johnson and William H. Seward (1865).

Writers and correspondents in this Series are primarily from Virginia (especially Berkeley County) and Kentucky. Prominent individuals include Pierre Gustave Tonte Beauregard, Braxton Bragg, David Holmes Conrad, Samuel Cooper, Samuel Wylie Crawford, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, J. E. Johnson, I. Nadenbousch, Daniel Ruggles, William T. Sherman, and Edwin M. Stanton.

The Lee Family Papers Series comprises primarily Colonial-era governmental and financial documents pertaining to Francis Lightfoot Lee, "Henry Light Horse Harry" Lee, and Richard Henry Lee, Sr. Documents pertain to slaves; maps and surveys of leased land; and loan indentures. Includes certificates appointing Francis Lightfoot Lee as Justice of the Peace (1757-1768); and a letter from Richard Henry Lee, Sr., to Henry Lee regarding the colonists' agitation for freedom (1770). Ante-bellum and Civil War documents in the Lee family papers include loan indentures; a bill of sale for cotton to the Confederate government; two cartes-de-visite (of Robert E. Lee); letters written by Richard Henry Lee, Jr., discussing the sale of his sister's slaves; and a letter from Robert Edward Lee to Samuel Cooper regarding poorly executed military orders (1865). Several documents throughout the collection include the original rare manuscripts dealer's description.

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Lewis F. Henderson Letters, 1862-1865 0.2 Linear Feet — 12 Items

Corporal in the Pennsylvania Volunteers, 32nd Regiment (3rd reserve), Company D. Letters from Corporal Lewis F. Henderson to an unidentified friend in Philadelphia contain accounts of the Battle of Gettysburg; the Battle of Cedar Creek; and the Battle of Lynchburg. Other topics include Union hospitals; the burning of Virginia Military Institute and Governor John Letcher's home; Union and Confederate desertions; and "copperheads" in Philadelphia. Letters provide description of Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864 and the last days of the Civil War.

Letters from Corporal Lewis F. Henderson to an unidentified friend in Philadelphia contain accounts of the Battle of Gettysburg; the Battle of Cedar Creek; and the Battle of Lynchburg. Other topics include Union hospitals; the burning of Virginia Military Institute and Governor John Letcher's home; Union and Confederate desertions; and "copperheads" in Philadelphia. Letters provide description of Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864 and the last days of the Civil War.

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Patrick H. Cain papers, 1783-1940 6 Linear Feet — Approx. 2,904 Items

Merchant, tobacco merchant, landowner, distiller, and State Representative, from Mocksville and Settle (Davie Co.), N.C. Personal, legal, business, and financial papers of Patrick H. Cain and the Cain family, from Davie County, N.C. Included are letters describing life and social customs in Georgia; the education of women; student life at Normal College (later Trinity College, then Duke University) and at the University of North Carolina; Western migration; prices of products and services, the value of slaves, and the wages of freedmen; and the life of Confederate soldiers and military actions at First Manassas and Gettysburg. Legal papers consist of land grants, deeds, mortgages, arrests and summonses for debts, promissory notes, and material relating to the administration of various estates. Financial records include tax receipts and accounts. There is one volume of patient accounts, 1906-1925, belonging to Dr. John Cain. Correspondents include George Burgess Anderson, Francis Asbury, Samuel Ashe, Kemp P. Battle, John Joseph Bruner, D. R. Bruton, Lyman Copeland Draper, David Moffatt Furches, William H. Hayes, William Hill, Hamilton C. Jones, Leonidas Polk, Zebulon Vance, and Jonathan Worth.

Personal, legal, business, and financial papers of the Cain family. Included are letters describing life and social customs in Georgia, 1824-1827; school life at girls' academies, 1843-1856, at Normal College (later Trinity College), 1855-1856, at a seminary, 1869, and at the University of North Carolina, 1871-1880; Western migration and Western lands; business methods; prices of products and services, the value of slaves, and wages and tenancy of freedmen; the life of Confederate soldiers, including accounts of military activities, especially First Manassas and Gettysburg, and comments on conditions in the army and on officers, Jefferson Davis, and Abraham Lincoln.

Legal papers consist of land grants, deeds, mortgages, arrests and summonses for debts, promissory notes, and material relating to the administration of various estates. There are broadsides concerning Jonathan Worth and W. W. Holden. Financial records consist of tax receipts; accounts, 1889-1895, kept in advertising booklets; and a ledger containing patient accounts, 1906-1925, belonging to Dr. John M. Cain, Patrick Cain's brother. There are many manuscript volumes in the collection, chiefly financial.

Correspondents include George Burgess Anderson, Francis Asbury, Samuel Ashe, Kemp P. Battle, John Joseph Bruner, D. R. Bruton, Lyman Copeland Draper, David Moffatt Furches, Will H. Hayes, William Hill, Hamilton C. Jones, Leonidas Polk, Zebulon Vance, and Jonathan Worth.

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Winn family papers, 1780-1925, bulk 1780-1889 5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes, 2,684 items, 27 vols.

Collection contains personal and business correspondence, papers, and volumes, mainly of John Winn (d. 1844), farmer, lawyer, and postmaster, and his son, Philip James Winn, physician and postmaster of Fluvanna Co., Va., and of the Winn (Wynn) family. The papers of the elder Winn relate to bounty claims of Revolutionary veterans, personal and business affairs, and include information about "Bremo," the plantation of Gen. John Hartwell Cocke. The papers of Philip James Winn relate to his education at the Virginia Military Institute and the University of Virginia, his career in medicine, the service of his brothers in the Confederate Army, and family activities, and include a description of the religious service of the Dunkards, records of the invention and patenting of a "new gate latch," and a letter of William H. Winn describing the battles of Bethel (1861) and Gettysburg (1863). More than half the collection consists of receipts and bills connected chiefly with John Winn's work in Revolutionary bounty lands and with Philip James Winn's invention. Twenty-seven volumes include post office accounts of John Winn and of his successor, Philip James Winn; a letter book concerning the "New Gate Latch"; accounts of the estate of Samuel Kidd; letter books; ledgers; medical notes; and records of births and deaths of slaves.

Family and business correspondence of John Winn (d. 1844); of his wife Lucy Winn; and of their numerous children, including Philip James Winn. The correspondence of John Winn, farmer, lawyer, postmaster at Winnsville, captain in the War of 1812, and agent for General John Hartwell Cocke, includes information on Bremo, the plantation of the latter, including also a list of periodicals subscribed to by Cocker and legal cases relative to Revolutionary bounty land.

Correspondence centering around Philip James Winn includes information on the Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, both of which he attended; one letter with a description of the unusual religious services of the Dunkards; a deed for land purchased by a free Negro; records of the invention and patenting of a 'New Gate Latch' by Philip J. Winn; and the interest of various members of the family in law, medicine, agriculture, mechanics, business, religion, and the operation of a stagecoach line between Richmond and Staunton, Virginia.

Collection also Includes a letter of William H. Winn containing detailed descriptions of the battles of Bethel, 1861, and Gettysburg, 1863, in which he participated as a Confederate soldier. More than half the collection consists of receipts and bills connected chiefly with John Winn's work in Revolutionary bounty lands and with Philip James Winn's invention. Twenty-seven volumes include post office accounts of John Winn and of his successor, Philip James Winn; a letter book concerning the 'New Gate Latch'; accounts of the estate of Samuel Kidd; letter books; ledgers; medical notes; and records of births and deaths of slaves.