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Anne Firor Scott papers, 1939-2009 19 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

The collection contains writings of Anne Firor Scott and materials relating to her academic work in Southern and women's history. The materials primarily refer to her scholarly activities, and include her dissertation, occasional papers, articles, speeches and lectures, book reviews, contracts, conference proceedings and schedules, course materials, newspaper clippings, and other activities related to academia. There is also a file of correspondence written by Anna Lord Strauss (then president of the League of Women Voters) in 1949 and mailed to all members the league. Notes by Scott in this file explain her connection to Strauss, and the circumstances of the correspondence. In addition, there are newspaper articles related to the first and second editions of Scott's book, The Southern Lady. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Preliminary container lists exist for only parts of the collection.

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Anne Firor Scott papers, 1963-2002 6 Linear Feet — 6000 Items

Anne Firor Scott taught in the History Dept. at Duke University from 1961-1991. She is currently W. K. Boyd Professor of History Emerita. The collection includes correspondence, subject files, and student papers and a videorecording. Most of the collection is restricted. It ranges in date from 1963-2002.

Collection contains correspondence, student papers, and committee records. Some materials relate to University matters, but most concern the study and teaching of American history, particularly the history of women in the South. Included are 24 students' reactions to the assassination of John F. Kennedy (1963), 17 student papers on the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (1979), a "Last Lecture" by Dr. Scott ("A Modest Proposal for a Quiet Revolution," 1966), 170 students' interviews with working women (1976), and a letter by Ruth Dozier describing the work of a home demonstration agent in North Carolina from 1900-1920. All of these materials are open for research. University-related material includes the University Scholar Teacher Award (1982-1983) [restricted] and included a files on the Provost Search Committee (1982-1983) which was removed by Archives staff. Correspondence is sometimes labeled Business Correspondence and sometimes as AFS Chronological File. The topical or subject files include letters of recommendation, History Department minutes, and files relating to seminars, meetings, publishing, and professional associations. The correspondence and subject files are closed except by permission of Dr. Scott and the University Archivist. The material ranges in date from 1963-2002.

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Contains the records of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, an interdisciplinary degree-granting program for scholars at Duke University. The Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies was established around 1968 in an effort to join and strengthen the medieval and renaissance programs at Duke University. Also includes materials of the Committee on Medieval and Renaissance Studies concerning the development of the program, the Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Types of materials include correspondence, budgets, newsletters, curriculum planning materials, announcements, reports, and minutes. Major subjects include the Duke University faculty, Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, university cooperation, renaissance study and teaching, and humanities study and teaching. Materials range in date from 1966 to 1982. English.

Contains correspondence, newsletters, curriculum planning materials, budgets, announcements, reports, and minutes pertaining to the establishment and operation of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Duke University. This collection reflects cooperative curriculum development among faculty of fine arts, sciences, literature, history, religion and philosophy departments. Materials range in date from 1966 to 1982.

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Leslie Brown was a Professor of History at Williams College, Williamstown, MA. She was born in 1954 and died in 2016. The Leslie Brown papers span the years 1936-2016 and undated and cover her entire career as a historian, from her doctoral training to her final position at Williams College. There is also extensive information regarding her professional interest in African-American history and the preparation of oral histories. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The Leslie Brown papers span the years 1936-2016 and undated and cover her entire career as a historian, from her doctoral training to her final position at Williams College. There is also extensive information regarding her professional interest in African-American history and the preparation of oral histories, especially those related to the Behind the Veil project at Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies. The Interviews series includes those conducted privately by Brown as well as those from various institutions that she used in her research. There are typescripts and audiocassettes. The Research/Subject files series focuses on her courses and publications, with a particular focus on Durham, NC, African-American organizations, and well-known individuals. A few research items predate Brown's birth. The Course Materials series contains subject and course files she used in her teaching, with an emphasis on African-American studies and oral histories. The Academia series provides information regarding her preparation as a historian, as well as material related to her job talks and lectures, professional activities, and book projects. The Publications series provides various publications related to African-American history, both privately published and from the popular press.

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Nell Irvin Painter papers, 1793-2019 and undated, bulk 1876-2007 184.25 Linear Feet — Approx. 134,625 Items

Nell Irvin Painter is a scholar, teacher, and writer in 19th- and 20th-century American and African American history who has been a faculty member of Harvard, Princeton, and the Universities of North Carolina and Pennsylvania. Collection spans the years 1793-2019, with the bulk of the material dating between 1876 and 2007, and contains correspondence, research notes, photocopies of original documents, manuscripts, publication proofs, syllabi, department memoranda, records of her speaking engagements, photographs, personal journals, papers, and photographs, many varying audiovisual formats, and computer diskettes. Also contains extensive file series related to the research and writing of five of her major books: Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas after Reconstruction; The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South; Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919; Sojourner Truth, A Life, A Symbol; and Creating Black Americans: African-American History and its Meanings, 1619 to the Present.

The Nell Irvin Painter Papers span the years 1793-2019, with the bulk of the material dating between 1876 and 2007, and are primarily composed of the extensive correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, and other professional papers that Painter has produced in her long career as a scholar, teacher, and writer in 19th- and 20th-century American and African American history. The materials document the breadth and depth of Painter's interests and her intellectual and personal influence on a generation of historians. Her varied roles as student, teacher, colleague, and mentor are recorded in a wide variety of formats: correspondence with colleagues, students, family, and friends; syllabi, department memoranda, and meeting minutes from her graduate and faculty positions at Harvard, Princeton, and the Universities of North Carolina and Pennsylvania; materials from many professional organizations in the fields of African American history, Southern history, American studies, and women's studies; and records of her speaking engagements, conferences, and meetings. Painter the historian and author are revealed in the extensive notes, photocopies, recordings, photographs, manuscripts, and proofs produced in writing many articles and five of her major books: Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas after Reconstruction; The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South; Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919; Sojourner Truth, A Life, A Symbol; and Creating Black Americans: African-American History and its Meanings, 1619 to the Present. The portrait is rounded out by the materials in other series: personal files, which include materials from her student years at Harvard and abroad in Ghana and France as well as personal journals; a few papers of Ghanaian writer Ayi Kwei Armah; photographs, including many historical photographs of African Americans as well as many personal snapshots in color and black-and-white; and other non-print media such as audiotapes, audiocassettes, videocassettes, and computer diskettes.

Painter's research files contain a wealth of information about many topics in American history: biography of African Americans; biography as a literary form; slavery; Reconstruction; the 1870s migration from the South to Kansas; a variety of social reform movements--such as abolition, communism, labor, and women's suffrage--and movers, such as Sojourner Truth and Hosea Hudson; and the history of social conditions and political change in the United States from the early-19th to the mid-20th century, particularly as expressed in race relations, in women's history, and in the South. At the same time, Painter's papers also constitute a contemporary record of many trends in American culture such as career and educational choices and opportunities for academic women and African American professionals. Her correspondence with students, colleagues, and longtime friends such as Nellie Y. McKay, her teaching material and academic files, her papers from an array of historians' organizations, and her personal journals each shed their own light on these themes.

The collection is arranged in these series: Correspondence, Writings and Research, Teaching Materials, Professional Service, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, Audiovisual Materials,Electronic Formats, and a collection of private papers collected by Painter, the Ayi Kwei Armah Papers. The first four series comprise almost eighty percent of the physical extent of the collection and are each divided into several subseries. The Correspondence Series follows Painter's personal life, education, and professional career from her graduate years at Harvard in the late 1960s through her retirement from Princeton in 2004.

The Writings and Research Series is arranged in seven subseries, the first five of which are based on five of Painter's major books; the final two subseries are Other Research Topics, which gathers many of Painter's shorter writings, and Writings by Others. With the exception of the last, all the subseries here contain correspondence with colleagues and editors; typescript drafts of works; various stages of proof; extensive photocopies of archival materials and published articles; voluminous notes about her readings and research; and some photographs and recordings, most of which have been removed to their respective series for preservation.

The Teaching Materials Series documents Painter's work with students and academic colleagues at Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of North Carolina, Hunter College, and Princeton University. It is arranged into two series: Courses Subseries, with syllabi, reading lists, and Painter's notes on the development of her courses that reflect the evolution of women's studies and African American studies in the curriculum; and the Academic Files Subseries, revealing Painter's many different roles over three decades: graduate student, job applicant, junior and tenured faculty member, dissertation advisor, mentor, and department head.

The Professional Service Series, arranged in two subseries, documents Painter's activities in the broader academic community beyond her university of employment and her personal connections through materials from well over one hundred professional organizations, conferences, foundations, committees and task forces, as well as editorial boards of journals and publishers with which Painter has worked during her career. The Engagements Subseries gathers documents relating to addresses, speeches, and awards ceremonies at some three hundred conferences, meetings, and symposia.

Five smaller series and a gathering of oversize material round out the collection. The Personal Files Series contains an assortment of records such as curriculum vitae; documents about her family; and some records of her student years, especially her travel and study in France and Africa. The series includes some three dozen personal journals covering most of the years from 1959-2005 containing entries about her life and career (NOTE: some journals are CLOSED to use; see details in the series note). The Photographic Materials Series contains several hundred photographs, negatives, and slides, predominantly personal and travel snapshots but also including professional portraits of Painter as well as a number of original photographs and reproductions of archival photographs she used in her research and writing. Much of the material in the early years of the Audiovisual Materials Series is related to her research and writing; by the 1990s, the content shifts focus to documenting Painter herself on the occasion of various interviews and addresses. The Electronic Formats Series consists of diskettes containing correspondence and drafts of writings. The Oversize Materials contains items from several series and subseries are gathered. The final series in the collection consists not of Painter's own work but that of a Ghanaian novelist and poet; see the Ayi Kwei Armah Papers (RESTRICTED) series note for further information on the provenance and usage of these materials.

Unprocessed additions to the collection are listed at the end of the collection guide.

Note about date range of materials: The primary material produced by Painter begins around 1959 with her earliest journals. Earlier dates in various series, occurring mainly in Writings and Research, reflect the intellectual content and original publication of the large volume of reproduced research material present in the collection.

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Robert H. Woody papers, 1927-1985. 6 Linear Feet — 6,000 Items

Contains the personal and professional papers of Robert Hilliard Woody, a professor of history at Duke University from 1929 to 1970. Types of materials include correspondence, manuscripts, short writings, vitae, certificates, diplomas, committee reports, printed material, photographs, 8 mm films, and VHS tapes. Major subjects include Robert H. Woody, the Civil War, the South, South Carolina, North Carolina, reconstruction, republicans, southern newspapers, biographies, mountain culture, folklore, history instruction, Duke University, the Duke University history department, and the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana. Major correspondents appearing in the collection include: William Preston Few, Francis B. Simkins, William K. Boyd, William T. Laprade, Francis Warrenton Dawson, Stanly Godbold, Jr., Arthur Hollis Edens, Paul M. Gross, Stanley Godbold, the Southern Historical Association, and the Historical Society of North Carolina. Some materials are restricted. Materials range in date from 1927 to 1985. English.

Contains the personal and professional papers of Robert Hilliard Woody, a teacher and historian at Duke University from 1929 to 1970. Materials include correspondence with individuals and professional organizations, films, clippings, and writings (including original Civil War correspondence) pertaining to Woody's research, and manuscript materials for biographies of Civil War statesmen and Duke University President William Preston Few. Major correspondents include colleagues at Duke University: Arthur Hollis Edens, Paul M. Gross, William Preston Few, Francis B. Simkins, William K. Boyd, and William T. Laprade. Correspondence is ordered alphabetically. Films are 8mm format. Some materials are restricted

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Contains the records of the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, a cooperative institute established in 1963 under the auspices of the Duke University-University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Cooperative Program in the Humanities. Also contains materials relating to the Duke University Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Types of materials include correspondence, grant proposals, budgets, invitations, rosters, announcements, minutes, local publications, and some conference papers. Major subjects include the Duke University Cooperative Program in the Humanities, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill faculty, Duke University faculty, the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Southeastern Renaissance Conference, university cooperation in North Carolina, renaissance study and teaching, and humanities study and teaching. Materials range in date from 1965 to 1981. English.

Contains materials of the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the Duke University Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Materials mostly concern session planning and relations with the Cooperative Program in the Humanities. Types of materials include correspondence, grant proposals, budgets, invitations, rosters, announcements, minutes, local publications, and some conference papers. Materials range in date from 1965 to 1981.