Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Subject Homosexuality -- Southern States Remove constraint Subject: Homosexuality -- Southern States
Number of results to display per page
View results as:

Search Results

Collection
Collection consists of computer files comprising oral histories conducted by students with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transexual, or Queer (LGBTQ) Duke alumni. The oral histories document the inviduduals' experiences as members of the LGBTQ community before, during, and after their time at Duke. The alumni attended Duke between the mid-1970s and 2000s and describe experiences at and around Duke and Durham, North Carolina from a variety of perspectives and time periods. The oral histories were collected as part of the Spring 2015 class LGBTQ History and Activism: Duke, Durham, and Beyond. Computer files include audio files (WAV and MP3), field notes and tape logs (DOC and DOCX), and the occasional supporting document file.

Collection consists of computer files comprising oral histories conducted by students with LGBTQ Duke alumni in 2015 and 2016. The oral histories document the inviduduals' experiences as members of the LGBTQ community before, during, and after their time at Duke. The alumni attended Duke between the mid-1970s and 2000s and describe experiences at and around Duke and Durham, North Carolina from a variety of perspectives and time periods.

Some interviews also compare the LGBTQ experience at Duke and in Durham to other locations around the country over different time periods.

Collection

Front Page records, 1975-2004 and undated 113.4 Linear Feet — 53,100 Items

Collection consists of materials used in production of the newspaper, specifically a large clippings file, flyers, newsletters, press releases, book PR, incoming correspondence, a "Kill" box file, some clippings organized by subject, papers centered on Lee Mullis and Jim Duley, a reader survey, faxes, some submissions, and a large number of other gay and lesbian publications.

The addition (2003-0036) (26,300 items; 43.5 lin. ft; dated 1975-2001 and undated) consists of periodicals, directories, clippings, press releases, advertising proofs, brochures, and other materials related to production of The Front Page and/or to gay/lesbian organizations, issues, and events throughout the U.S. Also includes subject and correspondence files; numerous issues of North Carolina Anvil from the late 1970s-early 1980s; a collection of drag photographs; direct mail materials; and several The Front Page, gay/lesbian, and event-themed t-shirts.

Addition (2008-0065) (2,500 items; 6 lin. ft.; 1970s-2006) includes reader surveys (mostly dated 1992); correspondence between readers and The Front Page; printed materials; gay pride and AIDS awareness posters; and miscellaneous materials and items.

Addition (2008-0245) (1,800 items; 2.4 lin. ft.; dated 1970s-1990s) contains research files; letters to the editor, 1980-1987; internal records; mailing lists; and printed materials. Several research files relate to early research and publicity of AIDS and the gay community in the 1980s.

Addition (2008-0287) (1,350 items; 1.8 lin. ft.; dated 1980-2004) includes organizational files, publications, and clippings from gay/lesbian associations and events.

Collection

Mab Segrest papers, 1889-2014 66.6 Linear Feet — 119 boxes

Dr. Mab Segrest is a feminist writer, scholar, and activist who received her PhD from Duke University in 1979. She was born in 1949 in Tuskegee, Alabama and attended Huntingdon College from 1967 to 1971. Multiple generations of Dr. Segrest's family have lived in the Tuskegee area and influenced its history and development. Segrest is recognized for speaking and writing about sexism, racism, homophobia, classism, and other forms of oppression. She has founded, served on the boards of, and consulted with a wide range of social justice organizations throughout her life. From its creation in 1969 until it disbanded in 1983, Segrest participated in the southern feminist writing collective Feminary working to produce the journal of the same name. After Feminary disbanded, she worked for six years (1983–1990) with North Carolinians Against Racist and Religious Violence (NCARRV), focusing much of her work on removing the Ku Klux Klan from North Carolina. She earned her livelihood from 1992–2000 as Coordinator of the Urban-Rural Mission (USA), part of the URM network of the World Council of Churches. After working full-time with various political organizations, Segrest returned to academia. From 2002 until 2014, Segrest worked at Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut. In 2004, Segrest was appointed the Fuller-Matthai Professor of Gender & Women's Studies there. She is currently conducting research for a book or series of books about the Central State Hospital in Milledgeville, Georgia. Her major published works include: Living in a House I Do Not Own (Night Heron Press, 1982), My Mama's Dead Squirrel: Lesbian Essays on Southern Culture, (Firebrand Books, 1985), Memoir of a Race Traitor (South End Press, 1994), and Born to Belonging: Writings on Spirit and Justice (Rutgers University Press, 2002).

This collection documents Segrest's personal life, education, and professional life and is comprised of materials related to her family, activism, research, writings, teaching, and travel.

The collection also contains a typescript of Dorothy Allison's Bastard out of Carolina.

There are significant materials relating to Segrest's work with the following organizations: The NC Coalition for Gay and Lesbian Equality, North Carolinians Against Racist and Religious Violence (NCARRV), The Center for Democratic Renewal (CDR), The North Carolina Coalition for Gay and Lesbian Equality (NCCGLE), National Women's Studies Association (NWSA), The World Council of Churches/Urban Rural Mission (WCC/URM), and The National Women's Studies Association/Southern Women's Studies Association (NWSA/SWSA).

Where possible, Segrest's original folder titles have been retained.

Collection
Online
According to the organization's website, Southerners on New Ground (SONG) is an intersectional activist organization that works to build, connect, and sustain those in the South who believe in liberation across all lines of race, class, culture, gender and sexuality. It was established in 1994 following a National Lesbian and Gay Task Force meeting. SONG is currently headquartered in Atlanta with regional offices across the South. The accession (2009-0098) (9.6 lin. ft.; dated 1993-2004) includes administrative and financial records, programming materials, and organizational files, all stemming from retreats, training, workshops, and community events sponsored or promoted by SONG. The accession also includes SONG materials from the Bayard Rustin project, People of Color activities, Pride at Work, and the Highlander Economy Educational Institute, among others. The accession (2015-0113) (2.9 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2015) was donated by Caitlin Breedlove, Co-Director of SONG from 2006-2015. It includes administrative and financial records, programming information, flyers and promotional materials and research related to campaign initiatives from her time in the SONG leadership.

The accession (2009-0098) (9.6 lin. ft.; dated 1993-2004) includes administrative and financial records, programming materials, and organizational files, all stemming from retreats, training, workshops, and community events sponsored or promoted by SONG. The accession also includes SONG materials from the Bayard Rustin project, People of Color activities, Pride at Work, and the Highlander Economy Educational Institute, among others.

The accession (2015-0113) (2.9 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2015) was donated by Caitlin Breedlove, Co-Director of SONG from 2006-2015. It includes administrative and financial records, programming information, flyers and promotional materials and research related to campaign initiatives from her time in the SONG leadership. The accession also contains cards and artwork given to Caitlin by others, assorted photographs from events, two interview recordings, and many of her personal notebooks.

Collection
Lawrence Timothy (Tim) Portwood (1974-) grew up in Southern California, attended Stanford (A.B., History, 1976), and earned his J.D. with distinction (1979) at Duke, where he was active in the Duke Gay Alliance. Collection comprises documents that Portwood received as a student or alumnus of Duke Law School. Other materials relate to LGBTQ life at Duke, as well as in Durham, North Carolina, and the Southeastern United States in the late 1970s.

Collection comprises documents that Portwood received as a student or alumnus of Duke Law School, including acceptance letters, reading lists and other preparatory materials, local information, directories, a 5th reunion booklet, commencement materials, copies of the Duke Law School newsletter "The Devil's Advocate," and a few photographs. The balance of the collection relates to LGBTQ life at Duke, as well as in Durham, North Carolina, and the Southeastern United States in the late 1970s. There are publications distributed in bars during the period, including Carolina Zipper, Cruise Magazine, Free Press Magazine, Whatever Magazine, and Pink Trash Magazine. There is a file related to the Duke Gay Alliance (1978-1979), along with business cards and a playlist for a few local gay discotheques. Also includes a flyer promoting a defense fund for a psychologist charged in 1977 with an "abominable and detestable crime against nature" under a North Carolina law.