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Collection
Online
Non-profit organization founded in 1975, based in Washington, DC, whose chief focus is promoting changes in U.S. foreign and military policy in support of global human rights. The records of the Center for International Policy (CIP) span the years 1960 to 2016, and document in detail the organization's global activities in support of human rights as well as its internal administration, funding, and public relations outreach. CIP's chief areas of interest lie in United States foreign and military policies, including the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA); topics cover human rights issues, U.S. relations with Central and South America, demilitarization, nuclear weapons, the Cuban trade embargo, money laundering and other aspects of international finance, terrorism, and the narcotics trade. The bulk of the files take the form of administrative files and records which contain correspondence, memos, data, reports, travel documents, and extensive files on other organizations; there are also many files of printed materials such as pamphlets, newsletters, and press releases.

The records of the Center for International Policy (CIP) span the years 1960 to 2016, and document in detail the organization's global activities in support of human rights as well as its internal administration, funding, and public relations outreach. CIP's chief areas of interest lie in documenting and reforming United States foreign and military policies, including the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Specific topics covered by materials in the collection include U.S. relations with Central and South America, particularly with Colombia, El Salvador, Haiti, and Cuba; U.S. relations with South and East Asia, particularly the Korean Peninsula; demilitarization in areas of conflict; nuclear weapons and the arms race; the Cuban trade embargo; money laundering and other aspects of international finance; terrorism in various countries; and the narcotics trade. The bulk of the files take the form of administrative files and records on other organizations which contain correspondence, memos, data, reports, travel documents, and extensive files; there are also many files containing printed materials such as pamphlets, newsletters, and press releases.

The CIP records are arranged in the following series: Development Files Series; Printed Materials Series; Oversize Materials Series; Robert White Papers Series; Adam Isacson Papers Series; Selig Harrison Papers Series; Wayne S. Smith Papers Series; Geographic, Subject, and Program Files Series; and Audiovisual Materials Series.

White's and Isacson's files retain their original arrangement into groups such as correspondence (some in digital form), research and subject files, speeches, and travel documentation. Harrison's files retain their original arrangment by region, such South and West Asia, East Asia and North Korea, while some materials have been removed to the Nuclear and Energy Subseries. The research files claim the largest proportion of the files for all individuals, and contain documentation on other organizations, individuals, and extensive information in particular on Central and South America and Asia. Other countries represented in the collection files to a lesser extent include Russia, Israel, Cuba and other countries surrounding the South and East Asia regions. Correspondence files are present throughout the collection, and include key individuals such as Iowa Senator Tom Harkin; Peter Dale Scott, former Canadian ambassador and political commentator; and Harrison Selig, Director of the Asia Program. Many other well-known politicians and activists are represented in smaller folders of materials; there are also a small number of administrative files related to internal staff members and board members. The development files reveal the nature of the CIP's fundraising activities, and the extent of support from charitable organizations; the most extensive files belong to the Ford Foundation, General Service Foundation, International Center for Development Policy, and the MacArthur Foundation; smaller files represent many other similar institutions.

Collection acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

Collection
Founded in 1998, the Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA) is a non-profit organization that primarily utilizes civil litigation against perpetrators of international human rights abuses. The CJA records span the dates 1945-2014, with most materials dating from 1972-2014, and consist of case files, amicus briefs, research materials, a small amount of press clippings, and audiovisual materials and electronic records related to cases. Attorneys who frequently appear in case file materials include: Matthew Eisenbrandt, Shawn Roberts, and Joshua Sondheimer. The CJA's civil casework in this collection largely relies upon the Alien Tort Statute and the Torture Victim Protection Act. Some of these cases were the first to litigate different aspects of human rights laws within United States courts. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The records of the Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA) span the years 1945-2014, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1970s to 2014. The materials document litigation activities of the CJA against international instances of human rights violations.

There are four main series: Case Files, Amicus Briefs, Press Clippings, and Research. The Case Files series — the largest in the collection — is divided into subseries for individual cases litigated by the CJA. These files typically contain filed court records, drafts of documents to be filed, exhibits, discovery materials, press clippings, and court, trial, and deposition transcripts. Files also include research related to individual cases, including country-specific research and evidentiary materials related to plaintiffs and defendants. Case files concern human rights crimes that occurred in the following countries: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chile, China, El Salvador, Guantánamo Bay Detention Camp, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Liberia, Somalia, and Timor-Leste. Attorneys who frequently appear in case file materials include: Matthew Eisenbrandt, Shawn Roberts, and Joshua Sondheimer. The Amicus Briefs series contains amicus curiae briefs written or signed by the CJA to support other human rights cases. Journal and newspaper clippings covering the CJA's practice are contained within the Press Clippings series. The final series, Research, primarily comprises regional background information that supported CJA's legal arguments against human rights crimes across the globe.

Most series include audiovisual recordings and electronic files related to legal cases. Formats include CDs, DVDs, audiocassette tapes, and 3.5" floppy disks. The audiovisual materials primarily include court and deposition recordings and transcripts, news coverage, and short documentaries. Electronic files typically include transcripts, memo drafts, and other documents.

Materials are chiefly in English, but some materials contain evidence, research, and transcripts in Spanish or French.

Materials in this collection may include firsthand accounts, descriptions, and images of torture and other violent acts.

Collection
Consumer Reports is a product testing and consumer advocacy nonprofit organization based in Yonkers, N.Y., founded in 1936. Rhoda Karpatkin is a lawyer and consumer advocate who served as Director of Consumers Union from 1974 until her retirement in 2001. The collection includes clippings; correspondence and memoranda; corporate and financial audits and reports; legal and legislative documents; meeting agendas and minutes; newsletters, pamphlets and other publications; photographs; press releases; speeches; texts of articles and other printed materials that document Karpatkins career with Consumers Union as well as her involvement with the international consumer movement. Topics include the Bhopal gas disaster; communism and the anti-communist movement during the Cold War; consumer protection; drug export controls; economic and human rights; environmental justice and policy protections; history of Consumers Union; sustainable consumption; tobacco use and passive health hazards; and transnationalism and international businesses. Individuals represented in the collection include Colston Warne, Eileen Nic, Esther Peterson, James Guest, Madeline Ross, Manubhai Shah, Michel van Hulten, and Ralph Nader. Organizations represented include the Administrative Conference of the United States, Consumer Product Safety Commission, Consumer Reports Books, Consumers Union Foundation, Consumers' Association of Canada, International Organization of Consumers' Unions (now Consumers International), Media and Consumer Foundation, and the United Nations. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The collection includes clippings; correspondence and memoranda; corporate and financial audits and reports; legal and legislative documents; meeting agendas and minutes; newsletters, pamphlets and other publications; photographs; press releases; speeches; texts of articles and other printed materials that document Karpatkins career with Consumers Union as well as her involvement with the international consumer movement. Topics include the Bhopal gas disaster; communism and the anti-communist movement during the Cold War; consumer protection; drug export controls; economic and human rights; environmental justice and policy protections; history of Consumers Union; sustainable consumption; tobacco use and passive health hazards; and transnationalism and international businesses. Individuals represented in the collection include Colston Warne, Eileen Nic, Esther Peterson, James Guest, Madeline Ross, Manubhai Shah, Michel van Hulten, and Ralph Nader. Organizations represented include the Administrative Conference of the United States, Consumer Product Safety Commission, Consumer Reports Books, Consumers Union Foundation, Consumers' Association of Canada, International Organization of Consumers' Unions (now Consumers International), Media and Consumer Foundation, and the United Nations.

Collection
Clippings, reports, publications, oral histories, and photographs from Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Dominican Repulic, Grenada, and other Caribbean countries, collected and produced by the Ecumenical Program on Central America and the Caribbean (EPICA). Materials document human rights, government and democracy, and labor conditions in the Caribbean, and largely date from the 1970s and 1980s.

The EPICA collection consists of approximately 7.5 linear feet of material contained in six cartons. Countries represented include Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Haiti, Grenada, and the French Antilles. Within each box, documents are in folders labeled by country and year(s), about 10-15 folders per country.

The documents were collected in the Caribbean by staff of EPICA (Ecumenical Program on Central America and the Caribbean, a small DC-based group originally funded mainly by the Latin American and Caribbean Office of the National Council of Churches, but no longer operating). The founder and first director of EPICA was the Rev. Philip E. Wheaton.

The collection consists of EPICA's research and subject files about various Caribbean countries, including Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Haiti, Grenada, Trinidad and Tobago, and the French Antilles (French West Indies). Documents were collected in the Caribbean by staff of EPICA. Materials include newsletters, leaflets, position statements, advocacy materials, analytical papers, and the like, from grassroots groups, political parties, church bodies, academics, etc., as well as oral histories on audiocassette, with transcriptions, used in the creation of the book Caribbean Connections: Moving North (2005). Most of the material is from the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Organizations represented include Sistren, the Catholic Church, the Inter-American Development Bank, Centro Dominicano de Estudios de la Educacion (CEDEE), Movimiento Campesino Independiente (MCI), and others. The collection also includes folders of notes, arranged geographically, from untaped interviews with grassroots activists, political party figures, academics, journalists, trade unionists, etc.

For each country there is also a folder of notes from interviews with grassroots activists, political party figures, academics, journalists, trade unionists, etc. These are not transcripts, as the interviews were not taped, but handwritten notes on what the person said.

In addition, there are printed materials, mostly publications by EPICA.

Collection

Elizabeth Fink papers, 1971-2015 7 Linear Feet — 779 Gigabytes

Elizabeth Fink was a human rights lawyer who represented prisoners killed and injured during the 1971 Attica prison uprising. The collection consists of photographs gathered as evidence used in the subsequent lawsuits on behalf of Attica prisoners, represented by Fink, as well as some copies of trial transcripts and audiovisual recordings of news coverage, interviews, and footage.

The collection consists of photographs gathered as evidence used in the subsequent lawsuits on behalf of Attica prisoners, represented by Fink, as well as some copies of trial transcripts and audiovisual recordings of news coverage, interviews, and footage of Attica Correctional Facility following the Attica uprising. There are also materials collected by Fink from the Attica Brothers Legal Defense. Content includes photographs and moving images of the prison uprising; guards and officials during the standoff; the subsequent assault and retaking of the prison ("Bloody Monday") by the Russell Oswald and the NY State Police; the aftermath of the assault, including images of the re-captured prisoners, deceased prisoners, debris from the uprising, and armed guards; morgue images and fingerprints of deceased inmates and hostages; interviews and news programs about the event; images of Attica prison facilities; and images and audiovisual of Fink's memorial service and the scattering of Fink's cremated remains. Some of the images and audiovisual materials have been digitized. Images depict graphic violence, nudity, and deceased persons. Collection acquired as part of the Archive of Human Rights (Duke University).

Collection
Global Rights is an international human rights advocacy organization headquartered in Washington D.C. The Global Rights Records span the dates 1980-2006 and consist of correspondence, administrative, research and project files, and printed material related to the work of Global Rights (known before 2003 as the International Human Rights Law Group - IHRLG), a human rights advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. Material in this collection documents human rights abuses in various contexts while also providing insight into the complex administrative issues facing nongovernmental organizations working to curb those violations. The collection is divided into series for Administrative Files, Country Files, Printed Material, and Project Files. The Administrative Files Series contains records of meetings of the board of directors of Global Rights, executive correspondence, and training material for human rights advocates. Material in the Country Files Series documents Global Right's activities in specific countries, generally concentrated in Africa, East Asia, and Latin America. Files on human rights and social conditions in Afghanistan, Bosnia and Hercegovina, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Zaire are among the most extensive in the series but other countries are also represented. The Printed Material Series chiefly consists of articles and speeches by IHRLG/Global Rights staff, and reports by the IHRLG on human rights in many countries. Various issue-based advocacy efforts chronicled in the Project Files Series complete the collection. Activities documented in this series include increasing legal infrastructure in Cambodia through the Cambodian Defenders Project; advocating for women's rights (economic and sexual) and targeting sexual slavery and human trafficking; and targeting racial discrimination in the U.S. and abroad. An extensive set of project files relates to advocacy for the ratification of human rights treaties, and documents several international meetings such as UN's Meeting of the States Parties to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the Meeting of the States Parties to the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (1980).

The Global Rights Records span the dates 1980-2006 and consist of correspondence, administrative, research and project files, and printed material related to the work of Global Rights (known before 2003 as the International Human Rights Law Group (IHRLG)), a human rights advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. Material in this collection documents human rights abuses in various contexts while also providing insight into the complex administrative issues facing nongovernmental organizations working to curb those violations. The collection is divided into series for Administrative Files, Country Files, Printed Material, and Project Files. The Aministrative Files Series contains records of meetings of the board of directors of Global Rights, executive correspondence, and training material for human rights advocates. Material in the Country Files Series documents the group's activities in specific countries, generally concentrated in Africa, East Asia, and Latin America. Files on Afghanistan, Bosnia and Hercegovina, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Zaire are among the most extensive in the collection. The Printed Material Series chiefly consists of articles and speeches by IHRLG/Global Rights staff and reports by the IHRLG on human rights in many countries. Various issue-based advocacy efforts chronicled in the Project Files Series complete the collection. Activities documented in this series include increasing legal infrastructure in Cambodia through the Cambodian Defenders Project; advocating for women's rights (economic and sexual) and targeting sexual slavery and human trafficking; and targeting racial discrimination in the U.S. and abroad. An extensive set of project files relates to advocacy for the ratification of human rights treaties, and documents several international meetings such as UN's Meeting of the States Parties to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the Meeting of the States Parties to the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (1980).

Collection

Ipas records, 1965-2020; 1965-ongoing 363 Linear Feet — 242 boxes

Online
Ipas works around the world to increase women's ability to exercise their sexual and reproductive rights, especially the right to safe abortion. The collection documents this global nongovernmental organization dedicated to ending preventable deaths and disabilities from unsafe abortion.

Collection documents this global nongovernmental organization dedicated to ending preventable deaths and disabilities from unsafe abortion. It consists of Ipas publications, including both electronic and printed formats, as well as Latin America and Caribbean Programs material, Africa Programs material, Asia Programs, Marketing/Technology and Logistics/Product Promotion, and Distribution material, Chronological Files, Program Files and Internal Documentation, Executive and Management files, Training and Service Delivery Improvement, Policy Unit files, and Health Systems Research/Research and Evaluation.

Acquired jointly as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the Human Rights Archive (Duke University).

This collection guide is being regularly updated as materials are added to the archive. Please contact Research Services if you would like to use this collection.

Collection

Jerome J. Shestack papers, 1944-2011 and undated, bulk 1965-2000 128 Linear Feet — 86 boxes — Approximately 57,000 items — Approximately 57,000 items

Jerome Shestack was a prominent lawyer and human rights advocate. His papers chiefly document the leadership roles he undertook for social justice organizations such as the American Bar Association, the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, the International League for Human Rights, the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, and many others, and the histories of those entities. Series include extensive correspondence and subject files, organization files, writings and speeches, publications and clippings, as well as a small collection of personal files, photographs, and Shestack's World War II diary. Topics covered in the collection include but are not limited to: the history of the American Bar Association; law and legislation related to international and domestic human and civil rights; American government policies on human rights; Jewish human rights issues; the defense of political dissidents such as Andrei Sakharov; disappeared persons in Argentina; the rights of the mentally disabled; and Shestack's role in standing against the Supreme Court nomination of Robert Bork. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The papers of Jerome Shestack span the years of 1944 to 2011, and document the leadership roles he undertook for legal and social justice organizations such as the American Bar Association, the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, the International League for Human Rights, the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, the American Jewish Committee, the International Criminal Court, and many others, and the histories of those entities. Series include extensive correspondence and subject files; organization files; writings by Shestack and others, such as reports, editorials, articles, and speeches; publications and clippings; trial testimonies and proceedings; as well as a small collection of personal files, photographs, and Shestack's World War II diary.

The materials provide insights into Shestack's many professional achievements and how his work in the legal profession intersected his passion for human rights. Shestack held leadership roles in many law and human rights organizations, often simultaneously; therefore, the materials also reveal how organizations often collaborated with one another to address human rights from a legal standpoint. A large portion of the material focuses on Shestack's dedication to the law profession through his active roles in the American Bar Association, which includes his position on the 1987 judicial committee against the Supreme Court nomination of Robert Bork, as well as his role as American Bar Association President from 1997 to 1998.

Other materials in the collection demonstrate Shestack's work to promote and defend human rights on a broad international scale. Significant file groups for countries and their associated human rights cases include Argentina, China, Israel, Russia, and South Africa. His particular interests pertaining to human rights include but are not limited to: law and legislation related to international and domestic human and civil rights; American government policies on human rights; Jewish human rights issues; the defense of political dissidents such as Andrei Sakharov; disappeared persons in Argentina and other human rights abuses; the rights of the mentally disabled; and the history of human rights advocacy.

The worldwide respect Shestack gained for his advocacy work is represented in the collection through extensive correspondence and subject files documenting his connections to notable human rights activists and prominent political leaders, including President Jimmy Carter, President George Bush, René Cassin, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Some audiovisual materials are scattered throughout the collection: a CNBC interview of Shestack as ABA President, International League for Human Rights Awards Dinner cassettes, Wingspread Interview cassettes, a Court TV Bosnia Trial VHS recording, and a recording of the Independent Counsel Symposium. Original media are closed to use; listening or viewing copies must be made for access.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Collection

Jill Over papers, 1966-2011 6.5 Linear Feet — 3500 Items

Feminist and social activist: involved in anti-war movement, abortion rights campaigns, youth and adolescent sex education, and pro-democracy movements in Latin America and Africa. Collection includes publications and research files related to human rights, social justice activism, and peace in Latin America and the United States; as well as ephemera, pamphlets, periodicals, and clippings related to youth liberation, sex education, reproductive health, and feminism, especially during the 1970s and 1980s. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the Human Rights Archive (Duke University).

Collection includes publications and research files related to human rights, social justice activism, and peace in Latin America and the United States; as well as ephemera, pamphlets, periodicals, and clippings related to youth liberation, sex education, reproductive health, and feminism, primarily dating from the 1970s and 1980s.

Collection
Maria de Bruyn is a medical anthropologist who worked for non-profit organizations in The Netherlands and United States, as well as international non-governmental and United Nations agencies, in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) with a special focus on HIV and AIDS and health-related human rights. She served on the Global Programme on AIDS Global Management Committee Task Force on HIV/AIDS Coordination as one of three nongovernmental organization (NGO) representatives; this Task Force contributed to establishing NGO participation in the governance of UNAIDS. She was also a co-founder of the ATHENA Network to advance gender equity and human rights in the global response to HIV and AIDS and worked with groups of women living with HIV on sexual and reproductive rights and advocacy. This collection includes de Bruyn's writings, work from her consultancies and other trainings and workshops, and her subject files on topics such as HIV/AIDS, sexual and reproductive health, human rights, condoms, discrimination, youth, sex work, and women's health issues. Subject files include brochures, ephemera, and artifacts such as condoms, buttons, and objects de Bruyn collected from her travels around the world. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection documents de Bruyn's scholarly writings, consulting work, collaboration with various global health and international policy organizations (including Ipas), and other contributions to the field of public and global health. Topics include sexual and reproductive rights, HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections, youth and adult sexual health education, human rights to healthcare, healthcare law and discrimination, condoms and contraception, and global health policies and advocacy. The collection also contains de Bruyn's extensive subject files, including artifacts and ephemera from her travels and career. The subject files are loosely arranged by geographic region, including samples of brochures, literature, flyers, and other items from the United States, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin American countries. De Bruyn's files also include public health resources, research articles, published accounts and testimonies, and examples of condoms, lubricant, sexual health artifacts, buttons, and other collected ephemera and objects.