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Human rights researcher and policy advocate at the Washington Office on Latin America. The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú.

The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú. The collection is divided into the Printed Material and the Subject Files Series; there is also a separate listing at the end of this finding aid of printed works transferred to the Duke University Perkins Library general collections. Beyond the research materials in these series, there are currently no additional personal papers of Youngers in the collection. The Printed Material Series contains published reports on human rights circulated by a wide variety of organizations working inside and outside Perú. Most of the Perú-based human rights organizations are connected with the Coordinadora de Derechos Humanos (CNDDHH), an umbrella human rights organization based in Lima. Youngers' research files on human rights issues and a subseries of Peruvian and Latin American serial publications complete the Printed Material Series. The Subject Files Series contains files and informal reports of the CNDDHH and associated human rights organizations, most notably the Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos (APRODEH), El Centro de Asesoría Laboral del Perú (CEDAL), and the Instituto Defensa Legal (IDL). Further documentation of human rights abuses by government and rebel factions, drug policy files, papers related to former Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori's security advisor Vladimiro Montesinos, and the Maoist guerrilla group Sendero Luminoso complete the collection. Material in this collection documents the complex links between Peruvian government policy and international pressure, and the violent tactics employed by revolutionary groups as well as agents of the Peruvian government. Further, it chronicles the consequences of those actions, especially for rural and indigenous populations and local human rights advocates. The collection also contains numerous U.S. government documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act which give insight into U.S. diplomacy, military and drug policy. Substantial portions of the collection are in Spanish. Aquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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Frederick Herzog papers, 1947-2011 (bulk 1947-1995) 32.4 Linear Feet — 24,300 Items

Frederick Herzog (1925-1995), former faculty member at the Duke Divinity School, was well known for his work on civil rights and liberation theology. The collection provides rich documentary evidence on the historical connections between religion, the Civil Rights Movement, and human rights. Material includes audio cassettes of lectures, minutes from Herzog's lectures and classes, several English and German manuscripts of Herzog's publications, research files, photographs, significant correspondence, and speeches and lectures. Several materials dated after 1995 were contributed by Kristin Herzog, Frederick Herzog's wife.

The Frederick Herzog Papers span the years 1947-2011 with the bulk of the material spanning the years 1947-1995, the year of Herzog's death. These papers provide rich documentary evidence on the historical connections between religion, the Civil Rights Movement, and human rights. The material covers specific areas in which Herzog was involved such as the Civil Rights Movement in Durham and other parts of North Carolina, Durham and Duke University history, student unrest in the 1960s, and human rights issues in Peru in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The collection includes video and audiocassettes regarding Herzog's involvement in Peru and various lectures and classes on theology. His work as a professor at the Duke Divinity School and with various other theological and civil rights organizations is documented in the correspondence he sent to and received from various individuals and groups, as well as in the various committee documents and minutes that record his professional activity in the university. The bulk of material on courses taught and lectures given by Herzog, as well as his participation in both the student exchange program with the University of Bonn and in the Peru and Bolivia student exchange program, can be found in his notebooks and course materials. A large part of this collection is comprised of Herzog's research files on religion, civil rights, labor organizing, racial issues, and protest in North Carolina and nationally, including Herzog's own participation in civil disobedience. Noteable research projects include his work in Peru, his work with the United Church of Christ (UCC) and the Evangelical Church of the Union (EKU), and his work with black churches and theology. This collection also contains original annotated drafts of a variety of Herzog's publications, sermons, speeches and lectures.

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The International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) is a non-profit organization that assists post-conflict, conflict, and democratic countries in pursuing accountability for mass atrocities and human rights abuses. The International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) Records include printed materials and publications, country files, staff files, audiovisual materials, and institutional and administrative materials.

The records of the International Center for Transitional Justice span the years 1918 to 2016, with the bulk of the materials from the late 20th and early 21st century. Gathered by staff at the ICTJ as a resource library, the files house publications from countries all over the world relating to peace processes and to the pursuit of legal reparations and reconciliation in areas of conflict involving human rights violations. Formats include annual reports, legal journals, human rights organization publications, a variety of reports and white papers, conference proceedings, newspapers, trial transcripts, as well as some posters and other ephemera.

There are four main series: Geographic Files, Reference and Reports, Program and Subject Files, and Administrative Files. The Geographic series contains materials from countries directly impacted by the work of ICTJ and its partners. It is arranged by continent and then by country. The Reference and Reports series is ICTJ's documentation library. The Program and Subject files contain thematically-arranged publications about ICTJ's main subject areas, such as transitional justice and reparations, as well as the programatic materials from ICTJ conferences, workshops, publications, truth commissions, and program divisions. The final series, administrative files, is largely comprised of the files of former ICTJ presidents Alex Boraine and Juan Mendez and other staff files. The staff files and the institutional memory files come together to form the narrative of the creation and work of ICTJ since its beginnings in 2001.

Within each series are audiovisual materials and digital files. These materials are inserted into the series they correspond with and cover formats including betamax tapes, mini-DVs, DVDs, CDs, VHS tapes, and cassette tapes. The audiovisual materials include trial recordings, staff interviews, conference recordings, and truth commission proceedings. Some of these were digitized by ICTJ staff. The born-digital records contain similar materials and also include training materials, ICTJ administrative materials, and program specific documents.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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The Washington Office on Latin America is an international human rights advocacy organization headquartered in Washington D.C. The Washington Office on Latin America Records span the dates 1962 to 2008 and consist of research and project files on nearly every country in Latin America, administrative records, clippings, correspondence, and printed material, all relating to the work of the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), a human rights advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. WOLA partners with local organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean to raise awareness of human rights abuses in the region and to influence the foreign policy agenda of the United States government. Materials in this collection provide a rich resource for the study of politically motivated violence and other human rights abuses throughout Latin America and also document the changing political climate towards the region in Washington D.C. over nearly four decades.

The Washington Office on Latin America Records span the dates 1962 to 2008 and consist of research and project files on nearly every country in Latin America, administrative files, clippings, correspondence, and printed material, all related to the work of the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), a human rights advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. WOLA partners with local organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean to raise awareness of human rights abuses in the region and to influence the foreign policy agenda of the United States government. Materials in this collection provide a rich resource for the study of politically motivated violence and other human rights abuses throughout Latin America, and document the changing political attitudes towards the region on the part of the U.S. government over nearly four decades. Numerous files of individual human rights abuse cases, including torture, forced disappearances, and executions can be found in this collection. In addition, WOLA's efforts to lobby for legislative change are chronicled throughout the collection. Material includes some ephemeral or hard-to-find printed material produced by leftist or guerilla groups in Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, and Mexico, as well as some audiovisual recordings housed within country files.

The collection is arranged in the following series: Administrative Files, Geographic, Initiatives and Activities, Sound Recordings, and Oversize Material. The Administrative Files Series contains records kept by WOLA directors and staff, many funding-related files, some overviews of WOLA's activities, and other files of an administrative nature such as meeting minutes and planning, and staff retreats. The largest in the collection, the Geographic Series is divided into subseries for most countries in the region, documenting the major political and human rights issues associated with each country. These files typically include large sub-groupings on the following broad topics: human rights cases specific to that country; economic development; drug policy and related issues, especially in Colombia and Mexico; elections; police and military; U.S. policy; international relations; files related to WOLA visits to or activities in that country; and in some cases, files of printed materials assembled by WOLA staff. The human rights files cover such issues as labor rights, peasants' rights and land reforms, indigenous people's rights, politically motivated abuses, killings, and discrimination, civil rights cases of all kinds, reconciliation and truth commissions, and the activities of human rights organizations in each country and in the U.S. The Initiatives and Activities Series, divided into topical categories as arranged by WOLA staff, covers the organization's issue-based work in areas such as U.S. drug policy, trade and banking, democratic and peace processes, economic development, issues related to the deployment of military and police forces, and more. A large group of records documents the extensive legislative work performed by WOLA on behalf of human rights issues. There is considerable overlap between this series and the Geographic Series. The Sound Recordings Series contains recordings of conferences, speeches, and events sponsored by WOLA and other groups. Finally, the six boxes in the Oversize Material section at the end of this collection guide contain large items such as posters and newspapers separated from the main collection and rehoused for preservation purposes. Materials are chiefly in English and Spanish, with a smaller percentage in French and Portuguese. All of the series and each subseries are described in more detail in the description of the collection that follows. Unprocessed additions to the collection have been added at the end of the finding aid. Collection was acquired as part of the Duke University's Archive for Human Rights.