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Duff Green papers, 1818-1909 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 1,855 Items

Merchant and manufacturer of Falmouth, Virginia. Correspondence, ledgers, daybooks, account books, and other business records (chiefly 1822-1875) of Green and his various associates, illustrating activities such as retailing, grain milling and merchandising, and cotton cloth manufacturing. The bulk of the collection is in the form of bound manuscript volumes. Firms represented include the Bellmont and Eagle flour mills, the Falmouth Manufacturing Company, and the Elm Cotton Factory. The papers also reflect the emergence of Fredericksburg, Va., as a business center, and the decline of Falmouth.

Collection includes business records of Duff Green (d. ca. 1854), merchant and manufacturer, of his son, McDuff, and of their partners and successors in a business dealing in various types of produce, including wheat, flour, textile products, general merchandise, etc. The firm operated under various names, including Duff Green, Duff Green and Son, the son apparently being William J. Green (d. ca. 1871), Green and Lane, and Green and Scott.

Unbound papers consist principally of business and a few personal letters. Bound volumes comprise records of the Bellemont and Eagle flour mills and other flour mills, and relate to the inspection of flour; cotton factories, generally branches of the Falmouth Manufacturing Company, owned and operated by the Greens, Scotts, and Lanes; a large general mercantile establishment, and dividends accruing to the various partners. There are full accounts of the operation of the Elm Cotton Factory, where Osnaburg, sail duck, bagging, wagon tents, etc. were manufactured as early as 1842. Mercantile ledgers and daybooks show the sale of various types of farm supplies, such as Osnaburg, ground plaster, flour, clover seed, and sundries. Unbound volumes include daybooks; ledgers; account books; records of cotton purchased, wood hauled, cloth shipped, flour sent by boat, and wheat hauled; cashbooks; memoranda; baling books; wool-carding books; time books; records of production, cash sales, wages, and expenses; letter books; invoices; notes and bills; and receiving and delivery books.

The records equally concern flour milling, general merchandise, and textile manufacture. There are also volumes of George J. Lightner and of John M. O'Bannon, who apparently had business connections with Duff Green. The records reflect the gradual emergence of Fredericksburg as a business center and the consequent decline of Falmouth.

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James Thomas papers, 1850-1879 12 Linear Feet — 23 boxes (14,008 items)

This collection contains business and personal correspondence, orders, price bulletins, and other papers, relating to the tobacco business of James Thomas, the tobacco industry in general, and the economic life of Virginia (1850s). Includes information on Thomas' assistance to the Virginia Baptist Seminary (now the University of Richmond). Correspondents and persons mentioned include J. L. M. Curry, George Frederick Holmes, and Basil Manly.

This collection consists principally of the apparently complete business papers and records, 1850-1863, of James Thomas, Jr. (1806-1882), one of the largest of antebellum tobacco manufacturers. In addition to an extensive business correspondence, numerous orders for tobacco from Maine, Massachusetts, Louisiana, Georgia, the Netherlands, England, and Australia are included, as well as prices current bulletins from firms throughout the world. The collection not only gives a detailed history of Thomas's enterprises, but affords much information on the tobacco industry in general and on other phases of the economic life of Virginia in the 1850s. Some of Thomas's private correspondence is also in the collection, including an occasional letter from such men as J. L. M. Curry and George Frederick Holmes. Some information is given on Thomas's aid to Basil Manly in his work with the Virginia Baptist Seminary (later the Univesity of Richmond), and on his financial assistance, which made it possible for the institution to remain open after the Civil War.

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Nannie Mae Tilley papers, 1883-1948 and undated 0.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 704 Items

Nannie Mae Tilley (1898-1988) was a historian and curator of the Manuscripts Deptartment of Duke University. The Nannie Mae Tilley papers contain correspondence and other materials collected by Tilley concerning servicemen in World War II, the Bonsack family of Virginia, and tobacco cultivation and manufacturing in Virginia. The large group of letters from U.S. servicemen reveals attitudes about military service, U.S. participation in World War II, and about Duke University, where many of them had been students. Another group of letters is from the John E. Bonsack family, and concerns the Bonsack family genealogy, particularly James E. Bonsack, inventor of cigarette rolling machine, and Jacob Bonsack, grandfather of John E. Bonsack, who owned a woolen mill at Good Intent, Virginia. Further materials, chiefly photostats of reports from Richmond, Virginia, printed in the New York Journal of Commerce, concern the production and marketing of tobacco in Virginia and methods of handling leaf tobacco. Also included is James A. Bonsack's obituary from 1924.

The Nannie Mae Tilley papers contain correspondence and other materials collected by Tilley concerning servicemen in World War II, the Bonsack family of Virginia, and tobacco cultivation and manufacturing in Virginia. The large group of letters from U.S. servicemen reveals attitudes about military service, U.S. participation in World War II, and about Duke University, where many of them had been students. Another group of letters is from the John E. Bonsack family, and concerns the Bonsack family genealogy, particularly James E. Bonsack, inventor of cigarette rolling machine, and Jacob Bonsack, grandfather of John E. Bonsack, who owned a woolen mill at Good Intent, Virginia.

Further materials, chiefly photostats of reports from Richmond, Virginia, printed in the New York Journal of Commerce, concern the production and marketing of tobacco in Virginia and methods of handling leaf tobacco. Also included is James A. Bonsack's obituary from 1924.

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William Weaver papers, 1809-1885 4 Linear Feet — 3,387 Items

Ironmaster and pioneer in scientific agriculture, from Goshen (Rockbridge Co.), Va. Correspondence and business papers of the owner of the Bath Iron Works, Buffalo Forge, Va., containing information about the iron industry in antebellum Virginia, the use of slaves as industrial laborers, life among Weaver's workers, the supply of iron to the Confederate government, the iron industry in the Confederacy, and industrial conditions in Virginia during Reconstruction. Personal correspondence discusses the progress of the war in Virginia and Confederate politics.

Collection contains business papers of William Weaver (1781-1863?), owner of the Bath Iron Works, dealing with the iron industry in Virginia, and containing information on types of items in demand; collection of debts; prices of iron, land, crops, and livestock; the hiring and use of slave labor; and diet, clothing, wages, and prices of slaves. Included are several lists of slaves, with a brief physical description and comments on their reliability as workers. Personal correspondence discusses cholera in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Baltimore, Maryland, 1832; smallpox in Lexington, Virginia; typhoid in Texas, 1853; the activities and pension of a Revolutionary soldier; state and national politics, especially under Andrew Jackson; the completion of the canal from the mouth of the Brazos River to Galveston, Texas, 1853; the election of 1860; vigilance committees in Virginia; the use of substitutes; troop movements through Lynchburg and Richmond, Virginia; food prices; the death of Thomas Jonathan Jackson; and the iron industry during the war. Letters, 1861-1863, from John Letcher (1813-1884), U. S. congressman, 1851-1859, and governor of Virginia during the Civil War, discuss his message to the Virginia General Assembly concerning state and Confederate affairs in 1861; rumors; the failure of the legislature to provide replacement troops; military actions at Gordonsville and Fredericksburg, Virginia; various Confederate and Union generals; the unlikelihood of European intervention; military activity in North Carolina; and public opinion in the North.