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The International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) is a non-profit organization that assists post-conflict, conflict, and democratic countries in pursuing accountability for mass atrocities and human rights abuses. The International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) Records include printed materials and publications, country files, staff files, audiovisual materials, and institutional and administrative materials.

The records of the International Center for Transitional Justice span the years 1918 to 2016, with the bulk of the materials from the late 20th and early 21st century. Gathered by staff at the ICTJ as a resource library, the files house publications from countries all over the world relating to peace processes and to the pursuit of legal reparations and reconciliation in areas of conflict involving human rights violations. Formats include annual reports, legal journals, human rights organization publications, a variety of reports and white papers, conference proceedings, newspapers, trial transcripts, as well as some posters and other ephemera.

There are four main series: Geographic Files, Reference and Reports, Program and Subject Files, and Administrative Files. The Geographic series contains materials from countries directly impacted by the work of ICTJ and its partners. It is arranged by continent and then by country. The Reference and Reports series is ICTJ's documentation library. The Program and Subject files contain thematically-arranged publications about ICTJ's main subject areas, such as transitional justice and reparations, as well as the programatic materials from ICTJ conferences, workshops, publications, truth commissions, and program divisions. The final series, administrative files, is largely comprised of the files of former ICTJ presidents Alex Boraine and Juan Mendez and other staff files. The staff files and the institutional memory files come together to form the narrative of the creation and work of ICTJ since its beginnings in 2001.

Within each series are audiovisual materials and digital files. These materials are inserted into the series they correspond with and cover formats including betamax tapes, mini-DVs, DVDs, CDs, VHS tapes, and cassette tapes. The audiovisual materials include trial recordings, staff interviews, conference recordings, and truth commission proceedings. Some of these were digitized by ICTJ staff. The born-digital records contain similar materials and also include training materials, ICTJ administrative materials, and program specific documents.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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The William Henry Chafe Oral History Collection spans the years 1933 through 1988, with most of the materials dated between 1972 and 1978. The collection consists mainly of oral history interview tapes and transcripts, but also includes interview notes and research files related to Chafe's book Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom.

The William Henry Chafe Oral History Collection spans the years 1933 through 1988, with most of the materials dated between 1972 and 1978. The collection consists mainly of oral history interview tapes and transcripts, but also includes interview notes and research files related to Chafe's book Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom.

The interview tapes and transcripts (1972-1978, undated), which comprise the bulk of the collection, include interviews with government officials, participants in the North Carolina civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, and opponents of the movement, including members of the Ku Klux Klan. The few research files in the collection include statistical data related to Greensboro elections (1930s-1950s), notes from the Joan Bluethenthal papers and a report by the North Carolina State Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights on civil disturbances at Dudley High School and North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, North Carolina in 1969.

The Audiotapes Series consists of two identical sets (one for preservation, one for use by researchers) of twenty-eight tapes containing oral history interviews. The Printed Material Series includes transcripts and/or notes on 67 oral history interviews, and three research files related to the civil rights movement and local politics in Greensboro.

Beyond the direct oral history materials, there is also a Writings and Research Series. It includes research notes for several chapters of Chafe's book in addition to newspaper clippings addressing topics such as Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination and the return of black veterans from the Vietnam War; an assortment of documents regarding the Black Panther Party collected by the Federal Bureau of Investigations' Counter Intelligence Program, and a number of publications produced by other authors. While the materials predominately relate to Greensboro, this series also includes information on civil rights activity in Durham, Chapel Hill, and the Research Triangle at large. The Photographs Series includes fourteen undated photographs.

William H. Chafe's book, Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom, chronicles the continuing conflict over desegregation in Greensboro in the 1950s and 1960s. Chafe explores the "progressive mystique" that defined the terms of culturally-sanctioned behavior, looking at how civility served to preserve the South's racial order. Within this context, he discusses the city's reaction to the Supreme Court's landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, the Greensboro sit-in movement begun by four college students at North Carolina A&T College in 1960, and the emergence of the Black Power Movement in the late 1960s.