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Albert Rees papers, 1966-1992 and undated 10.5 Linear Feet — 6300 Items

Collection contains correspondence, lectures, writings, and course notes. There is testimony involving a union dispute. Some correspondence is divided by name of correspondent.

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Consumer Reports is a product testing and consumer advocacy nonprofit organization based in Yonkers, N.Y., founded in 1936. Abraham J. Isserman was a labor lawyer, counsel to the American Civil Liberties Union during the 1930s, and one of the original members of the Board of Directors of Consumers Union. The Consumer Reports A.J. Isserman papers includes correspondence, clippings, court briefs and depositions, book manuscript drafts, photographs and other printed materials relating to Isserman's work in civil rights and labor law. Topics include labor union activities and strikes, civil liberties, communist influence, investigations into Un-American activities, deportation, and disbarment of lawyers. Persons and institutions reflected in the collection include the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, the Dies Committee, Judge Harold Medina, and Leinhard Bergel. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Consumer Reports A.J. Isserman papers include correspondence, clippings, court briefs and depositions, book manuscript drafts, photographs and other printed materials relating to Isserman's work in civil rights and labor law. Topics include labor union activities and strikes, civil liberties, communist influence, investigations into Un-American activities, deportation, and disbarment of lawyers. Persons and institutions reflected in the collection include the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, the Dies Committee, Judge Harold Medina, and Leinhard Bergel. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

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Consumer Reports is a product testing and consumer advocacy nonprofit organization based in Yonkers, N.Y., founded in 1936. Paul Kern served as Legal Counsel and a member of the Board of Directors of Consumers Union in the 1940s-1950s. The Paul Kern papers include clippings, correspondence, legal documents, pamphlets and other printed materials that primarily document Kern's work as legal counsel for Consumers Union. Issues addressed include copyright infringement and fair use of Consumers Union intellectual property; Post Office censorship relating to Consumers Union's publication on contraception and sexual health; labor relations and union negotiations; libel complaints over reviews published in Consumer Reports magazine; management and employee pension programs; and property issues relating to the Mount Vernon offices of Consumers Union. Correspondents include John J. Carson (Federal Trade Commission) and Frank Walker, Postmaster General. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Paul Kern papers include clippings, correspondence, legal documents, pamphlets and other printed materials that primarily document Kern's work as legal counsel for Consumers Union. Issues addressed include copyright infringement and fair use of Consumers Union intellectual property; Post Office censorship relating to Consumers Union's publication on contraception and sexual health; labor relations and union negotiations; libel complaints over reviews published in Consumer Reports magazine; management and employee pension programs; and property issues relating to the Mount Vernon offices of Consumers Union. Correspondents include John J. Carson (Federal Trade Commission) and Frank Walker, Postmaster General.

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Don Roy papers, 1921 - 1980 25.5 Linear Feet

Donald Francis Roy (1909-1980), noted industrial sociologist, was a faculty member at Duke University in the Department of Sociology from 1950 until his retirement in 1979. Roy's areas of specialization were field methods of sociological research and social conflict. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, reviews, manuscripts, research and field notes, reprints, newsletters, photographs, teaching materials, pamphlets, and other written materials. The major subjects of the collection are Roy's study of industrial sociology; workplace interactions; and specific collective bargaining and union campaigns of the Textile Workers Union of America, the Teamsters Union, and the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees. English.

The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, reviews, manuscripts, research and field notes, reprints, newsletters, photographs, teaching materials, pamphlets, and other written materials. The major subjects of the collection are Roy's study of industrial sociology; workplace interactions; and specific collective bargaining and union campaigns of the Textile Workers Union of America, the Teamsters Union, and the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees.

While at Duke, Roy studied the attempts made by the Textile Workers Union of America to have union contracts accepted in some of the mills of Virginia and North Carolina. Between 1956-1959 and 1973-1979, Roy made detailed observations on the campaigns at the Hanes Knitting Company in Winston-Salem, N.C., 1956-1957; Elkin, N.C., 1956-1957; Chatham, Va., 1956; Burlington, N.C., 1957; Roanoke, Va., 1956 and 1965; Radford, Va., 1957; Vinton, Va., 1957; Dublin, Va., 1957; Altavista, Va., 1957; Henderson, N.C., 1958-1959; Roanoke Rapids, N.C., 1964-1979; Wallace, N.C., 1974 and 1977; Laurinburg, N.C., 1977-1979. The bulk of the information about these campaigns can be found in Boxes 1-5 and Boxes 14-19. Manuscripts on the Sheffield and Tyndall campaigns can be found in Box 1.

In addition, Roy followed the disputes involving the Teamsters Union in Atlanta, Ga., 1966, and the attempt by Local 77 of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees to establish a union at Duke Hospital in the 1960s and 1970s. Throughout his life, Roy took detailed field notes, collected materials, and retained correspondence about his industrial studies. These materials are scattered throughout the collection.

In 1965-1966, Roy spent a year on sabbatical at Cornell University. During that year, Roy wrote case studies on the Tyndall Garment Co., the Sheffield and Laurel Campaigns, the Burlington Campaign, the Corinth Study, and the Labor Organizing Campaign. Roy's field notes and observations are included in the collection.

Roy used pseudonyms, to protect confidentiality, for the names of the people and places he studied. Box 14 contains a list of the pseudonyms Roy used in his case studies. The following list gives the actual name followed by the pseudonym used by Roy in some of his studies and in his folder titles.

Missing Title
Hanes Knitting
Tyndall Garments
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Lancaster
Elkin, N.C.
Laurel
Chatham, Va.
Sheffield
Burlington, N.C.
Jefferson
Roanoke, Va.
Statesboro
Radford, Va.
Zebulon
Vinton, Va.
Corinth
Dublin, Va.
Indian Hills
Altavista, Va.
Cartersville
Roanoke Rapids, N.C.
Clearwater

Box 6 contains files for a book begun by Roy about his interest and involvement in union organizing. The book was not completed. The collection file contains Mrs. Roy's outline of the book's organization.

The collection file includes a paper by Huw Beynon with notes and comments about Roy's papers. Beynon's manuscript offers a proposed classification for the collection and outlines themes of Roy's work. The collection file also includes a biographical sketch by Dr. Joy K. Roy, Roy's second wife.

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Edward H. Chamberlin (1899-1967) was an economist and professor at Harvard University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, and items of a personal nature.

The Edward H. Chamberlin papers document his career as an economist and professor. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on topics such as monopolistic competition, market structure, pricing behavior, economies of scale, and collective bargaining, among others. The collection also documents his correspondence with prominent economists and individuals such as Marice Allais, Luigi Einaudi, Dwight Eisenhower, Howard S. Ellis, Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Gottfried Haberler, Frank Hahn, Roy Harrod, Friedrich A. Hayek, Richard Kahn, Nicholas Kaldor, Frank Knight, Emil Lederer, Wassily Leontief, Abba Lerner, Gertrud Lovasy, Fritz Machlup, Hans Neisser, J. F. Normano, Francois Perroux, Dennis H. Robertson, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, Thomas Schelling, Robert Schuman, Joseph Schumpeter, Ben Seligman, George Stigler, Frank Taussig, Gerhard Tintner, Jaroslav Vanek, Jacob Viner, and many others.

Along with his scholarship and writings, the collection documents Chamberlin's roles in the American Economic Association, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Council of Economic Advisers, and the Rockefeller Foundation project to aid refugee scholars fleeing Europe during the 1930s; his editorship of the Quarterly Journal of Economics; his speaking engagements; expert testimony in legal proceedings and before houses of the United States Congress; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions at Harvard. The collection also contains personal artifacts documenting Chamberlin's service in the National Guard during World War 1, his service as a member of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during World War 2, as well as awards and honorary degrees.

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Daniel Levinson Wilk is a historian. Muravchik was a longtime staff member of the Socialist Party of America and the Jewish Labor Committee. Collection comprises an audiocassette tape of the oral history interview conducted by Wilk with Emanuel Muravchik while Wilk was completing his graduate work at Duke University. The interview primarily focused on Muravchik's career in the Socialist Party, particularly from the 1920s to the 1950s, and mostly in New York State. There is no transcript for the interview, and two digital files have been created from the audiocassette.

Collection comprises an audiocassette tape of the oral history interview conducted by Wilk with Emanuel Muravchik while Wilk was completing his graduate work at Duke University. The interview primarily focused on Muravchik's career in the Socialist Party, particularly from the 1920s to the 1950s, and mostly in New York State. Related topics include Muravchick's education; the process followed to place Norman Thomas on the New York State ballot as a Socialist Party candidate for the 1940 Presidential election; the relationships between socialists and communists; approaches used to build the Socialist movement; union and other organizing; as well as the impact of WWII on the movement and its leaders. Among the noted persons mentioned was J. Edgar Hoover. There is no transcript for the interview, and two digital files have been created from the audiocassette.

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Frank Traver De Vyver papers, 1899-1980 27 Linear Feet — 15,000 Items

Frank Traver De Vyver, 1904-1980, was an economist, professor of economics, and university administrator at Duke University from 1936-1980, and Vice-President of Erwin Cotton Mills from 1945-1955. The Frank Traver De Vyver Papers, 1899-1980, comprise the correspondence, writings, research, administrative and managerial records, and other professional papers of the economist Frank Traver De Vyver, who was a scholar on the history of labor economics and labor movements and unions. The collection is arranged in six series. Correspondence and Personal Papers contain his personal and professional correspondence and biographical material, including a photograph album of his travel abroad and a scrapbook of his career. The Writings and Research Series contains drafts and reprints of his articles and his research on labor unions and industrial arbitration in Australia and the United States. The Department of Economics Series mainly consists of departmental correspondence and administrative records. De Vyver's work as a Duke University administrator is documented in the University Committees Series, with the largest groups of materials being from the University Planning Committee and the Educational Facilities Committee. The Subject Files cover all of De Vyver's professional activities, including his work as a professional arbitrator for the American Arbitration Association; his managerial career as Vice-President of Erwin Cotton Mills, Durham, N.C.; his service on government committees and boards, including the War Production Board; his scholarly work on labor economics and industrial relations, collective bargaining agreements, grievance procedures, wages, and textile workers; documents on the Textile Workers Union of America; and his work on the history of labor movements and labor unions in the United States, Australia, and South Africa. The Printed Materials Series contains reprints of his articles and a variety of other formats, including clippings, pamphlets, posters, and serials.

The Frank Traver De Vyver Papers, 1899-1980, comprise the correspondence, writings, research, administrative and managerial records, and other professional papers that De Vyver produced in a half-century career as an economist and scholar specializing in the history of labor economics, movements, and unions, as a professor of economics and a university administrator at Duke University, and as an industrial manager and arbitrator. De Vyver's papers have been arranged in the following six series. The Correspondence and Personal Papers Series primarily consists of his personal and professional correspondence, but also contains biographical material, including a photograph album of his travel abroad and a scrapbook of clippings, photographs, and printed materials about his professional career. The Writings and Research Series contains drafts and reprints of De Vyver's articles and his notes and research materials on such topics as the history of labor unions and industrial arbitration in Australia and the United States. De Vyver's writings are followed by the Department of Economics Series, which includes some teaching materials but is mainly composed of departmental correspondence and administrative records. In addition to his teaching and departmental duties, De Vyver was also very active in the administrative life of Duke University, and this part of his career is extensively documented in the University Committees Series. His work on more than twenty committees, councils, and task forces is represented here, with the largest groups of materials deriving from the University Planning Committee and one of its standing committees, Educational Facilities, which De Vyver chaired from 1962-1974. The Subject Files make up the largest series, comprising almost half the collection. These files cover the full breadth of De Vyver's professional life, not only complementing topics covered in other series but also documenting many colleagues, organizations, and subjects not represented elsewhere in the collection. The following are among the most prominent groups of materials in the Subject Files: De Vyver's work as a professional arbitrator, generally as a representative of the American Arbitration Association; his managerial career as a Vice-President of Erwin Cotton Mills, a textile mile formerly in Durham, N.C.; his service on various government committees and boards, including the War Production Board; his scholarly work on and professional involvement with a wide variety of subjects and organizations in the fields of labor economics and industrial relations, including collective bargaining agreements, grievance procedures, wages, and textile workers; materials about the Textile Workers Union of America; and the history of labor movements and labor unions in the United States, Australia, and South Africa. The final series of the collection consists of Printed Materials, including reprints of De Vyver's articles and a wide variety of loose research materials in such categories as clippings, pamphlets, posters, and serials.

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Assorted manuals and publications produced by the International Ladies Garment Workers Union and its various local unions.

Collective agreements, union literature, and publications from the ILGWU Educational Department, as well as assorted publications from various local unions, including the Dressmakers, Beltmakers, Shirtmakers, Office and Distribution Employees, and others. Materials address issues of workers' rights, the benefits of unionization, communism (including anti-communist efforts within the union), governance of the unions, and union history.

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Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. Collection spans 1932-1978 and includes correspondence, contracts, reports, surveys, radio and television program scripts and other materials that document the operations of the JWT Radio and Television Department. The bulk of the materials pertain to interactions with several labor unions representing the interests of actors, writers and others involved in radio and television broadcast production, including: American Federation of Musicians (AFM), American Federation of Radio Artists (AFRA, later the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists--AFTRA), Producer-Composers and Lyricists Guild of America (P-CLGA), Radio-TV Directors Guild (RTDG), the Screen Actors Guild (SAG, later merged with AFTRA to form SAG-AFTRA), and the Television Authority. Sponsor companies represented include Ballantine, Ford, Kodak, Kraft, Lever (Unilever), Quaker Oats and Schlitz. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sale, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection spans 1932-1978 and includes correspondence, contracts, reports, surveys, radio and television program scripts and other materials that document the operations of the JWT Radio and Television Department. The bulk of the materials pertain to interactions with several labor unions representing the interests of actors, writers and others involved in radio and television broadcast production, including: American Federation of Musicians (AFM), American Federation of Radio Artists (AFRA, later the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists--AFTRA), Producer-Composers and Lyricists Guild of America (P-CLGA), Radio-TV Directors Guild (RTDG), the Screen Actors Guild (SAG, later merged with AFTRA to form SAG-AFTRA), and the Television Authority. Sponsor companies represented include Ballantine, Ford, Kodak, Kraft, Lever (Unilever), Quaker Oats and Schlitz. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sale, Advertising & Marketing History.

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Mark Perlman papers, 1952-2002 62.7 Linear Feet — 38,450 Items

The papers of university professor and economist Mark Perlman span the dates 1952-1994, with most of the papers being dated between 1967 and 1989. The papers consist chiefly of professional correspondence to and from Perlman, indexes to these letters and a small number of subject files, but include none of his personal papers. The collection documents Perlman's career as an economist and author at Cornell, Johns Hopkins, and the University of Pittsburgh and reflects his interest in work arbitration, trade unions, and the economics of public health. Among correspondents are many noted economists, including Moses Abramovitz, Martin Shubik, and Martin Bronfenbrenner. While many of the letters are personal in nature, others contain considerable information about Perlman's work, particularly in the years around the publication of his works Judges in Industry: A Study of Labor Arbitration in Australia (1954) and Spatial, Regional, and Population Economics: Essays in Honor of Edgar M. Hoover (1972). Additional correspondence relates to the publication of the Journal of Economic Literature.

The correspondence during Perlman's early years at Cornell includes letters in which Perlman and his friends and colleagues discuss their work, their students, and academic life. These early letters also contain travel arrangements for a trip to Australia in connection with his book Judges in Industry and information regarding Perlman's research for the book.

During Perlman's years at Johns Hopkins (1955-1964), much of the correspondence between him and his colleagues concerned Perlman's writings on work arbitration and trade unions. It was during this period that Perlman's interest was drawn to the economics of public health, and his correspondence reflects this through dialogue with other economists and statisticians as well as through inquiries regarding his research and replies from organizations providing requested information. Correspondence also includes letters concerning academic administrative matters, such as recommendations for students and fellow faculty members.

The Journal of Economic Literature correspondence consists of correspondence relating to the publication of the journal, of which Perlman was the founder and editor from 1968 through 1981. The early letters contain information about the formation of the journal. While many letters concern subscription matters, others contain discussion of particular articles, and some have manuscripts attached.

A small series of Subject Files includes correspondence with printers who worked with Perlman on the publication of his monographic works as well as on the Journal of Economic Literature; Perlman's teaching material (including course outlines, syllabi, and tests); a file on seminars established at the University of Pittsburgh to address topics of interest to the cultural life and economy of the city; correspondence with the American Economic Association in Nashville, Tennessee; and printed material and research papers submitted to a conference of which Mark Perlman was on the Program Committee. The conference, entitled "Human Resources, Employment, and Development," was held in Mexico in 1980.

Addition (acc# 1997-0208)(1500 items, 1.5 linear feet; dated 1991-1996) contains professional correspondence for 1995, an alphabetical index for all letters 1991-1996, and numerical indexes for correspondence during each year from 1991 to 1996.

Addition (acc# 1999-0188)(1200 items, 3 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) contains incoming and outgoing correspondence for 1996 and 1997, arranged in numerical order as assigned by Perlman. It also includes a chronological index for 1996-1997 correspondence, and an alphabetical index for letters dated 1991-1997.

Addition (acc# 2000-0098)(750 items, 1.5 linear feet; dated 1998) includes professional correspondence from 1998 and a printout of the numerical index for correspondence of that year. Also includes electronic numerical indexes for correspondence 1994-1999. Computer files have been migrated to the electronic records server.

Addition (acc# 2001-0071)(1000 items, 1.5 linear feet; dated 1999) is comprised of primarily personal and professional correspondence from 1999, with frequent reference to Perlman's writings and lectures and to other economists and their views. Also included on paper and as 6 electronic documents are correspondence indexes: a chronological index for 1999 and alphabetical indexes for the years 1991-1999. All indexes contain summaries of each letter's contents. The computer files have been migrated to the electronic records server. A container list was not created for this accession.

Addition (acc# 2002-0119)(750 items, 1.2 linear feet; dated 1991-2001) contains primarily personal and professional correspondence from 2000-2001. Also includes on paper and as 6 electronic documents an alphabetical index of correspondence for 1991-2001 with summaries of each letter's contents. A container list was not created for this accession.