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Campbell Family papers, 1731-1969 20 Linear Feet — 8,334 items — 37 volumes

The collection was originally called the David Campbell Papers, but was changed to reflect the presence of papers originating from other relatives. Members of the Campbell family represented in the collection:

  1. Campbell, David, 1779-1859
  2. Campbell, William Bowen, 1807-1867
  3. Campbell, Arthur, 1742-1811
  4. Campbell, John, 1789-186?
  5. Campbell, James, 1794-1848

Family, business, and political correspondence of David Campbell (1779-1859), governor of Virginia, 1837-1840, lieutenant colonel in the War of 1812, major general in the state militia west of Blue Ridge mountains; and of William Bowen Campbell (1807-1867), governor of Tennessee, 1847-1848, and member of U.S. Congress, 1837-1843, 1865-1866; and of their families, friends, and political associates.

David Campbell (1779-1859), a deist and devotee to the reforms of the American Revolution, left a set of remarkable papers concerned with many activities, including education, politics, wars, religion, household economy, methods of travel, slavery, secession, commission business, settlement of the old Southwest, legal practice, and general mercantile pursuits. Included also are many letters concerned with the War of 1812, in which he served as major and lieutenant colonel of infantry, with information bearing on quarrels among officers, inefficiency of military organization, courts-martial, lack of patriotism, and promotion of officers over their seniors.

From 1814 until 1837, while David Campbell was political leader of western Virginia, his papers reflect his career, throwing light on state politics, state militia, affairs of the office of clerk of court, which position he held, many intimate details of the Virginia Assembly, in which he served, 1820-1824, and accounts of various journeys made to Philadelphia when buying goods for his mercantile establishment in Abingdon. Campbell's papers for 1837-1840 contain material on the common schools, the panic of 1837, establishment of the Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, and the state asylum for the deaf, dumb, and blind. After 1840 his papers refer to his activities as school commissioner, as trustee of an academy and of Emory and Henry College, Washington County, Virginia, as justice of the peace, and as a planter.

In letters to his wife, his nieces, and his nephews are many references to Thomas Mann Randolph, Winfield Scott, the bank and sub-treasury of the Jackson-Van Buren era, disapproval of emotion in religion, concern for the plight of the free Negro, and interest in historical works and literature. Included also are accounts of various Revolutionary battles in which his forebears took part, of the early history of the Abingdon vicinity, and of religious denominations.

Letters, 1785-1811, to David Campbell include those of his uncle, Arthur Campbell (1742-1811), famous Indian fighter and Revolutionary patriot, containing treatises on democratic government; comments on thought of French philosophers of the eighteenth century; reminiscences of the Revolution; and comments on European affairs, especially the rise of despotism under Napoleon. Other letters to David Campbell include many from William C. Rives during the most active period of Campbell's leadership in Virginia politics. Letters to Maria Hamilton (Campbell) Campbell (1783-1859), wife of Governor David Campbell, from her father, Judge David Campbell (1753-1832), contain information on the early settlement of eastern Tennessee, government and politics of the young state, and information on Archibald Roane, his brother-in-law and an early governor of Tennessee.

Letters of John Campbell (1789-186?), member of the executive council of the governor of Virginia, member of the state constitutional convention of Alabama, 1819, treasurer of the United States, and brother of Governor David Campbell, contain information on student life at Princeton College, Princeton, New Jersey, prominent men and events in Richmond, 1810-1817 and 1819-1829, War of 1812, John Taylor of Caroline, Virginia penitentiary, Spencer Roane, states' rights, Lafayette's visit, Jacksonian campaign of 1824-1828, Virginia constitutional convention of 1829, Richmond Theatre fire of 1811, Andrew Jackson as president, Peggy O'Neale affair, storage of specie in 1837, rise of the Whig party, Washington gossip, and Washington bureaucracy. In the letters of Arthur Campbell (1791-1868), brother of Governor David Campbell and government clerk in Washington, 1831-1851, are accounts of mercantile pursuits in Tennessee; Andrew Jackson; Thomas Ritchie; and Washington gossip.

Letters of James Campbell (1794-1848), lawyer and member of Tennessee legislature, contain accounts of his college life and studies at Greenville, Tennessee, law practice in Tennessee, settlement of Alabama, Tennessee legislation, literary and historical works, the theater in Nashville, and dramatic literature of his day.

Letters and papers of Governor William Bowen Campbell, nephew of Governor David Campbell, contain accounts of his legal training in the law school of Henry St. George Tucker at Winchester, Virginia; law practice in Tennessee; services as circuit judge; activities in Creek and Seminole wars, 1836; small-scale farming operations; mercantile establishment in Carthage, Tennessee; firm of Perkins, Campbell, and Company, commission merchants in New Orleans; banking business as president of the Bank of Middle Tennessee at Lebanon; Mexican War; activities of the Whig party in Tennessee; career as governor; plans to prevent secession; bitter local fighting of the Civil War; and his career as a Unionist during and after the war, including his disappointment in methods of Reconstruction by Congress while he was a member of that body in 1865-1866.

Of the many letters by women, those of Virginia Tabitha Jane (Campbell) Shelton, niece and adopted daughter of Governor David Campbell, contain valuable information on social events in Richmond while her uncle was governor; household economy; dress; slavery; methods of travel; literary works; conditions of Union University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, Brownsville Female Academy, Brownsville, Tennessee, and West Tennessee College, Jacksonville, Tennessee, where her husband, William Shelton, taught; political campaigns; slavery; and a variety of items important in the social history of the period. Included in the collection also are the letters of Adine Turner, remarkable for their literary excellence and sparkling wit. Numerous letters from relatives in Arkansas reveal much information connected with the early history of the state. Letters of the McClung family of East Tennessee contain information on the settlement, growth, and Civil War in that area.

Also included are papers for several related families, including the Owens, Montgomerys, Kelleys, and Newnans. Papers, 1811-1831, concern the estate of Hugh Montgomery, and a Moravian tract on that land. Letters in the 1830s include several from Daniel Newnan, U.S. congressman from Georgia, dealing with Andrew Jackson, Sam Houston, and political corruption. Letters of the Owen family, originally of North Carolina, deal with Daniel Grant, a Methodist minister of Georgia, 17881796, his opposition to the Baptists, and the disturbance of his conscience by the question of owning slaves; the Great Revival of 1800 as described by Thomas Owen; and medical education in Philadelphia of John Owen, 1810-1812, and of his sons, Benjamin Rush Owen (1813-1849) and John Owen (1825-1889). Papers of David C. Kelley include letters concerning his education in medical school at the University of Nashville, 1850s, and his service as missionary in China, along with his wife, Amanda (Harris) Kelley, 1855; several writings by him, including "A New Philosophical Discovery"; legal papers; and family correspondence with his second wife, Mary Owen (Campbell) Kelley, 1870s and 1880s, and his son, David C. Kelley, Jr., 1890s and early twentieth century.

Genealogical material includes two notebook tablets containing copies of North Carolina and Tennessee wills, deeds, marriage records, and other documents pertaining to the Wherry, Bowen, Montgomery, Newnan, Campbell, and Kelley families. There are religious writings, poetry, leaflets, booklets, and clippings. Volumes are chiefly account books of Governor William B. Campbell. Also included are a daily journal kept by David Campbell while governor of Virginia, a volume containing copies of his wife's letters to him, 1812-1825, a short diary kept by William B. Campbell during the Mexican War, a diary of John D. Owen, and a photograph album containing pictures of members of the Campbell, Kelley, Pilcher, Owen, and Lambuth families.

Among the correspondents are Joseph Anderson, William S. Archer, Alexander Barry, Thomas Barrow, John Bell, William Blount, Willie Blount, O. H. Browning, William G. Brownlow, B. F. Butler, Joseph C. Cabell, A. Campbell, David Campbell, William B. Campbell, William P. A. Campbell, Newton Cannon, Mathew Carey, George Christian, Henry Clay, Thomas Claiborne, I. A. Coles, Edmund Cooper, J. J. Crittenden, Claude Crozet, Jefferson Davis, L. C. Draper, J. H. Eaton, Benjamin Estill, Emerson Etheridge, M. Fillmore, S. M. Fite, William H. Foote, E. H. Foster, Joseph Gales, Horatio Gates, M. P. Gentry, William A. Graham, Felix Grundy, A. Hayne, G. F. Holmes, George W. Hopkins, Andrew Jackson, Cave Johnson, Charles C. Johnston, William B. Lewis, L. McLane, Bishop James Madison, A. J. Marchbanks, P. Mayo, R. J. Meigs, William Munford, P. N. Nicholas, A. O. P. Nicholson, Thomas Parker, John M. Patton, Balie Peyton, Timothy Pickering, Franklin Pierce, J. R. Poinsett, James Knox Polk, William C. Preston, J. A. Quitman, J. G. M. Ramsey, T. J. Randolph, T. M. Randolph, William C. Rives, Thomas Ritchie, A. Roane, Wyndham Robertson, Theodore Roosevelt, Edmund Ruffin, Benjamin Rush, John Rutherfoord, Winfield Scott, Alexander Smith, William B. Sprague, A. Stevenson, Jordan Stokes, W. B. Stokes, A. H. H. Stuart, Johnston Taylor, Zachary Taylor, Waddy Thompson, H. St. G. Tucker, Martin Van Buren, J. W. C. Watson, Daniel Webster, Gideon Welles, H. L. White, J. S. Yerger, and F. K. Zollicoffer.

From Guide to the Cataloged Collection in the Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University, by Richard C. Davis and Linda Angle Miller, (Duke University, 1980).

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Lawyer and U.S. District Judge, of Spartanburg, S.C. Personal, political, and professional letters and papers relating to Wyche's personal life, his early legal practice, social life and customs in South Carolina, local politics in South Carolina, his term in Congress (1913-1914), his service in World War I, the political career of Cole L. Blease, Wyche's interest in reform, and the 1924 senatorial election in South Carolina.

Papers of Charles Cecil Wyche, lawyer and United States district judge for the western district of South Carolina, contain correspondence and papers concerning business and legal affairs, politics, and family matters. Specific topics include Wyche's support of John Gary Evans in his campaign to be United States senator from South Carolina, 1908; descriptions of Paris, Brussels, and Berlin in letters of Isoline Wyche, 1909-1910; an attempt to prevent the granting of a pardon by Governor Cole L. Blease of South Carolina, 1911; Wyche's term in the state legislature, 1913; Wyche's legal business, particularly relating to the collection of debts and suits for damages in cases of industrial and automobile accidents; the campaign of Cole L. Blease for the governorship of South Carolina, 1916; attempts by Wyche to form a regiment of volunteers for service in Mexico or Europe; the influenza epidemic of 1920; and the national and state election of 1924, especially Wyche's support for James F. Byrnes in his race for the United States Senate against Nathaniel Barksdale Dial.

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Edward Brodnax Hicks papers, 1800-1913 4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 7 volumes; 3,516 items

Collection contains correspondence, legal documents, mercantile records, notes, and other papers, of Edward Brodnax Hicks (1800-1858) and of his son, David S. Hicks, lawyer, planter and judge of Lawrenceville, Virginia. The material relates to legal and judicial activities, Texas land deals, the Atlantic and Danville Railway Co., and other matters. Correspondents include Thomas Ewing, D. J. Claiborne, Jr., Leigh R. Page, and Lewis Taylor.

Collection includes business, personal, and legal correspondence of Edward B. Hicks (d. 1858), lawyer and planter, and of his son, David S. Hicks, lawyer, planter, and land agent. Papers of Edward B. Hicks include jockey club dues, records connected with his duties as sheriff in 1821 and possibly later, and with Hicks' position as superintendent of schools in Brunswick County in 1847.

Included also is an extensive series of letters and papers relating to the operation, in partnership with John W. Paup, of a plantation at Red River, Arkansas, in 1837 and later. Letters also show that Hicks engaged in the business of selling slaves at New Orleans, Louisiana, during 1852. Other interesting letters are from Lewis Taylor on the War of 1812 and another, in 1817, relative to disturbances at Princeton College, Princeton, New Jersey, caused by refusal of professors to accept state bank notes.

Centering around David S. Hicks after 1858, the papers are largely legal documents, notes, and correspondence concerned with his law practice and the administration of the estate of Edward R. Hicks. The most continuous series among these legal papers is a set of letters from Leigh R. Page, a Richmond attorney. Papers also pertain to the efforts of Hicks and one Turnbull to sell lands in Brunswick County to Northerners.

Included also are records of Hicks's activities as judge of Brunswick County, as dealer in Texas lands, and as an organizer of the Atlantic and Danville Railroad. One letter, June 30, 1866, from D. J. Claiborne, Jr., concerns Southern Negro congressmen. Fifteen letters from General Thomas Ewing are concerned with the Atlantic and Danville Railroad.

The volumes, generally mercantile records, evidently came into the collection as a result of Hicks's legal practice and duties as sheriff.

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Eugenius Aristides Nisbet papers, 1804-1934 25 Linear Feet — 15,909 Items

Lawyer, U. S. Representative and Confederate representative, of Macon, Ga. Correspondence, legal notebooks, bankbooks, family albums, genealogical charts, memorabilia, and other items, of Nisbet and of his family. The bulk of the collection consists of largely routine legal correspondence of Nisbet, of his son, James Taylor Nisbet, lawyer and editor, and of his brother, James Alexander Nisbet. Other papers relate to social life and customs in 19th century Georgia, political events after the Civil War, soldiers' views of the Spanish-American War, the education of girls in the early 20th century, and Nisbet family genealogy. Includes personal correspondence of Junius Wingfield Nisbet and a diary (1873-1879) of John W. Nisbet. Correspondents include Charles L. Bartlett, H. B. Battle, William Horn Battle, Allen D. Candler, W. C. Dawson, Charles H. Herty, Walter B. Hill, Malcolm Johnston, Alexander R. Lawton, John M. Kell, Wilson Lumpkin, Howard E. Rondthaler, William Schley, Hoke Smith, and James M. Smith. Also includes a transcription of a land conveyance allowing the state of Georgia to purchase 1134 acres of land from Major-General Anthony Wayne.

Correspondence, legal notebooks, bankbooks, family albums, genealogical charts, memorabilia, and other items, of Nisbet and of his family. The bulk of the collection consists of largely routine legal correspondence of Nisbet, of his son, James Taylor Nisbet, lawyer and editor, and of his brother, James Alexander Nisbet. Other papers relate to social life and customs in 19th century Georgia, political events after the Civil War, soldiers' views of the Spanish-American War, the education of girls in the early 20th century, and Nisbet family genealogy. Includes personal correspondence of Junius Wingfield Nisbet and a diary (1873-1879) of John W. Nisbet. Correspondents include Charles L. Bartlett, H. B. Battle, William Horn Battle, Allen D. Candler, W. C. Dawson, Charles H. Herty, Walter B. Hill, Malcolm Johnston, Alexander R. Lawton, John M. Kell, Wilson Lumpkin, Howard E. Rondthaler, William Schley, Hoke Smith, and James M. Smith. Also includes a transcription of a land conveyance allowing the state of Georgia to purchase 1134 acres of land from Major-General Anthony Wayne.

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Lawyer, and Governor of Virginia, from Winchester (Frederick Co.), Virginia. Papers contain letters from Holliday while a student at Yale University, 1846; papers relating to the 33rd Virginia Regiment, which Holliday raised and commanded during the Civil War; letters concerning the International Exhibition held in Philadelphia in 1876, at which Holliday served as a commissioner from Virginia; and letters and papers relating to Holliday's election as governor in 1877; and letters from his term as governor, for the most part dealing with routine political and administrative matters. Also includes printed matter and scrapbooks of clippings and letter books created while Holliday was a student at Yale and at the University of Virginia, 1845-1849, and as governor of Virginia, 1878-1879; and four record books concerning Holliday's legal work.

The papers of Frederick William Mackey Holliday contain letters from Holliday while a student at Yale University, 1846; papers relating to the 33rd Virginia Regiment, which Holliday raised and commanded during the Civil War; letters concerning the International Exhibition held in Philadelphia in 1876, at which Holliday served as a commissioner from Virginia; and letters and papers relating to Holliday's election as governor of Virginia in 1877 and letters from his term as governor, for the most part dealing with routine political and administrative matters.

Printed material includes The Struggles, Perils and Hopes of the Negroes in the United States, a pamphlet by Reverend C. Clifton Penick, 1893; a typed copy of "The Virginia Debt in Politics," by William L. Royall, published in 1897 as History of the Virginia debt controversy; and broadsides, campaign literature, and other political material.

Volumes include ten scrapbooks of clippings; letter books of Holliday as a student at Yale and the University of Virginia, 1845-1849, and as governor of Virginia, 1878-1879; and four record books concerning Holliday's legal work.

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George B. Harrison papers, 1821-1924 18 Linear Feet — 13,488 Items

Lawyer, of Clarke Co., Va. Correspondence, daybooks, and family, business, and other papers. The bulk of the collection consists of cancelled checks, bills and receipts, legal papers, newspaper clippings, and advertisements. The papers deal with Civil War destruction in Virginia, social life in Virginia after the war, American interest in Cuba (1869-1870), agriculture and land in Florida (1880s), social, political, and economic activities in Clarke Co., the genealogy of the Harrison family, and other matters. Correspondents include Thomas R. Dew and Harry F. Byrd.

Correspondence, daybooks, and family, business, and other papers. The bulk of the collection consists of cancelled checks, bills and receipts, legal papers, newspaper clippings, and advertisements. Topics include Civil War destruction in Virginia, social life in Virginia after the war, American interest in Cuba (1869-1870), agriculture and land in Florida (1880s), social, political, and economic activities in Clarke Co., the genealogy of the Harrison family, and other matters. Correspondents include Thomas R. Dew and Harry F. Byrd.

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James Hinton Pou, Sr. correspondence, 1865-1944 6.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 1 oversize folder — Approx. 4065 items

Collection consists of the personal and professional correspondence of James Hinton Pou, Sr., lawyer, politician, and land developer of Raleigh, North Carolina. Topics cover late 19th and early 20th century North Carolina politics and legal system, business and land development in North Carolina, the history of Raleigh, N.C. and Wake County, and the Pou-Bailey families.

Collection consists of the personal and professional correspondence of James Hinton Pou, Sr., a lawyer, businessman, and land developer of Raleigh, North Carolina. Topics cover late 19th and early 20th century North Carolina politics and legal system, business and land development in North Carolina, the history of Raleigh, N.C. and Wake County, and the Pou-Bailey families of central North Carolina. Other items mixed in with the correspondence may include memorabilia, bills, and receipts.

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James Iredell Sr. was a statesman and one of the first justices of the Supreme Court of the United States serving from 1790 to 1799. James Iredell Jr. was the governor of North Carolina (1827-1828) as well as a U.S. Senator from North Carolina (1828-1831). Topics in this collection include revolutionary sentiment in North Carolina, North Carolina's ratification of the U.S. constitution, national politics, the legal and political careers of both James Iredell Jr. and Sr., correspondence from family and friends in England and Ireland, and other family affairs.

The papers of the elder Iredell concern colonial life and Revolutionary sentiment in North Carolina; the Revolution and North Carolina's ratification of the Constitution; and North Carolina and national politics (1780s and 1790s); and include early letters from friends and relatives in England and Ireland, including the Macartney family. Most of the correspondence between 1799 and the War of 1812 concerns family and business matters. Papers of James Iredell, Jr., pertain mostly to his legal career. Other topics include his student activities at Yale, national and North Carolina politics, naval appointments, patronage matters, the nullification crisis, and family affairs. Correspondents in the collection include John Branch, John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, Samuel Chase, William R. Davie, Oliver Ellsworth, Robert Y. Hayne, Joseph Hewes, William Hooper, John Jay, Charles Lee, Henry Lee, H. E. McCulloh, John Marshall, A. Nielson, William Paterson, Timothy Pickering, Richard Dobbs Spaight, Sr., Zachary Taylor, and John Tyler.

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Lawyer and U.S. Representative from North Carolina. Correspondence, legal documents, and other papers (chiefly 1850-1870 and 1912-1937) of John Humphrey Small; of his father-in-law, Col. Rufus W. Wharton, lawyer and planter; and of Col. David M. Carter, lawyer, planter, businessman, and court official, of Fairfield, N.C. Small's papers form the bulk of the collection and concern his North Carolina agricultural interests, his legal practice, his activities in Congress, river and harbor improvements, the Intracoastal Waterway, patronage, Southern financial conditions, U.S. and North Carolina politics, World War I labor problems, and the 1929 Depression. The papers before 1850 are mainly deeds, family papers, and legal documents. Wharton's and Carter's papers relate largely to the legal profession and to their agricultural interests.

Papers of John Humphrey Small (1858-1946), attorney, planter, and U.S. congressman, 1899-1921; of his father-in-law, Colonel Rufus W. Wharton (1827-1910?) attorney and planter; and of Colonel David M. Carter (d. 1879), attorney, planter, businessman, and court official of Fairfield, North Carolina. Arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Financial Papers, Legal Papers, Miscellaneous Papers, Printed Material, and Volumes.

The papers centering around Rufus W. Wharton and David M. Carter, principally legal and financial papers, include deeds and indentures; wills; inventories; estate and settlement papers; note collections; papers relating to the sale of corn by commission merchants; stock transactions; charter of the Dismal Swamp Canal Company, 1787; papers relating to the Albemarle Swamp Land Company, 1879, the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal Company, 1881, and swamp land transactions for Carter heirs, 1879-1890; papers dealing with the administration of the estate of David M. Carter by Rufus W. Wharton, and after Wharton's death, by John Humphrey Small; correspondence concerning lumbering and farming in North Carolina during the 1890s; and personal correspondence, including letters from Frances (Carter) Schaeffer from Germany, Austria, and North Carolina.

The bulk of the papers focuses on the career of John Humphrey Small in the United States Congress, his interest in the development of rivers and harbors and the Intra-Coastal Waterway, his membership on the National Rivers and Harbors Congress, and his legal practice. Papers relating to his congressional campaign in 1898 concern North Carolina politics, especially in the 1st Congressional District, civil service abuses, the Light House Service, and the vote of Populists, Republicans, Quakers, and Negroes.

Correspondence during his years in Congress discusses plans for a white grade school in Washington, North Carolina, 1903-1904; conditions of large scale farming at Edgewater, North Carolina, including descriptions of seeds, fertilizer, prices, machinery, crop conditions, and marketing, 1903-1912; problems of railroads, especially the Norfolk and Southern Railroad; the presidential campaign of 1916; coastal highway development; various rivers and harbors bills; the Inlet Waterway project; transportation via an inland waterway; the National Rivers and Harbors Congress; railroad and water transportation in relation to national defense during World War I; land acquisition and construction plans for the Intra-Coastal Waterway from Norfolk, Virginia, to Beaufort, North Carolina; problems of labor, including the movement for the eight hour day; labor shortages in eastern North Carolina during World War I; prohibition; woman suffrage; the National Guard; military service and the draft; coal shortages during the war; army camp sites; home guards; rising prices; excess profits tax; the Red Cross; various agricultural bills, national and North Carolina politics; a Congressional trip of inspection to the Far East in 1920, including Japan, Korea, and the Philippines; the Railroad Act of 1920; and routine matters such as patronage, post office appointments, appointments to West Point and Annapolis, and pensions for Spanish-American War veterans.

Correspondence after Small's retirement from Congress concerns the postwar economic depression; immigration legislation in the 1920s; the membership of the State Geological Board; the vice-presidency of the Atlantic Deeper Waterways Association; business conditions during the early 1920s and during the depression; condition of eastern North Carolina banks, 1920-1922 and 1932; Small's service as president of the National Rivers and Harbors Congress, 1920-1922; the promotion of the port of Wilmington, North Carolina, by the state; Democratic politics; the presidential campaign of 1932; the National Recovery Act; railroads in 1935; the development of airmail service; conditions during World War II; and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Other correspondence pertains to the opening and building of his law practice in Washington, D.C.; his partnership with Angus W. McLean, governor of North Carolina, 1925-1929; and specific legal cases. Miscellaneous papers consist of the minutes of the Tri-State Aviation Corporation, photographs, invitations, and Small's speech on the inland waterway.

Legal papers include the papers relating to various estates, including David M. Carter, Charles Adams, and others; papers concerning income tax; papers dealing with the development of Washington Park, North Carolina; papers pertaining to specific cases; incorporation papers of the Tri-State Aviation Company and All-American Aviation, Inc.; deeds, indentures and wills; and papers of the legal practices of David M. Carter and Rufus W. Wharton.

Financial papers include bills and receipts, 1830-1940, consisting of household accounts, clothing bills, promissory notes, tax receipts, court costs, estate inventories, medical bills for family and slaves, and records of slave sales; material on Confederate taxation; papers, 1870s, of a Baltimore, Maryland, cotton factor; records, 1880s, of corn sales; tobacco warehouse receipts, 1890s, from Greenville, North Carolina; business papers dealing with Jonathan Havens, Jr., commission merchant in corn and grain in Washington, North Carolina, and founder of the Havens (cottonseed) Oil Company and receivership papers of the St. Paul (North Carolina) Cotton Mills, 1939-1941.

Among the printed materials are clippings on the Depression, 1930-1934; personal items; biographical material on Senator Joseph E. Ransdell of Louisiana and on Rear Admiral Colby N. Chester; copies of the Greenville (North Carolina) Daily Reflector, December 27, 1913, and the Red Triangle, Paris, April 5, 1919; seed catalogues; reprints of the House of Representatives reports and bills on immigration, 1921, and airways, 1937; broadsides of the 1920 election; plan of organization of the Democratic Party in Beaufort, North Carolina, in 1896; the "Declaration of Principles" of the National Rivers and Harbors Congress, 1916, and its officers for 1916-1917; and a bond pamphlet for the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal Company, 1879.

The volume is the Individual Voting Record by Roll Calls in the House of Representatives for John H. Small during the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd sessions of the 66th Congress, 1919-1921.

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Samuel Calvin papers, 1792-1929 15 Linear Feet — 2761 Items

Lawyer and political leader, of Hollidaysburg (Blair Co.), Pa. Personal, legal, and business correspondence, legal papers, reports, notices, and other material. The political material relates to Blair Co. and Pennsylvania Whig politics, to Calvin's service as U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania (1849-1851), patronage, service to constituents, and national problems and issues. The legal papers largely concern collection of clients' debts. Business records and papers relate to a mining concern in Colorado, industrial firms in Pennsylvania; canal, railroad, and road transportation; westward expansion in Iowa and elsewhere, and the price of land in the West.

Personal correspondence and legal papers of Samuel Calvin. Main items of the collection are: letters pertaining to local and state "Whig" politics in Pa., 1846-1851 especially; letters, reports, and maps concerning the Rico Reduction and Mining Co. of Rico, Colorado (1881-1883); ledgers and daybook of the Allegheny Force and the Rebecca Furnace Co. of Hollidaysburg, Blair Co., Pa. (1849-1857) and letters concerning the business of the company; letters and notices relating to transportation in Pa. by railroads, canals, and roads (for example, letters of 1851 Feb. 10; 1855 July 24; 1856 Feb. 21-22; and notice of 1836 Feb. 17); letters by Robert Williams and others in Iowa regarding westward expansion, roads to the West, and prices of land in Iowa (for example, letter of 1853 Oct. 18 and land tax receipts for 1856-1857); a series of letters from 1859 written by Lorin Blodget, Thomas B. Lincoln, and Samuel Calvin (son-in-law of John A. Blodget) with reference to a plan for recovering real estate in Washington, D.C., formerly own by Samuel Blodget (1757-1814), noted Washington architect and land speculator; numerous bills and receipts; and legal documents. The collection is strongest for the years 1838-1883. There are about 15 letters in the collection written by Samuel Calvin.

For the years before 1846, the collection consists largely of letters to Calvin from persons desiring legal aid in the collection of debts. In addition, there is an interesting 13-page letter by William Smith, written from Philadelphia on 1793 Oct. 22, regarding the cholera epidemic in that city. Also, legal documents are abundant. These include indentures; wills; accounts of settlements of estates; a commission of bankruptcy (1803); powers of attorney; articles of agreement (business contracts); a paper of apprenticeship (1839); citizenship papers (1838 and 1840); mortgages; court dockets (Courts of Common Pleas of Huntington and Blair counties); written statements of witnesses in civil and criminal cases; printed copies of the record in certain cases argued by Calvin. Such legal documents will be found throughout the collection. Other items are: a plan of Hollidaysburg, Pa. (1840); bills and receipts (foodstuffs, fabrics, hardware, medicines, and drugs); a copy of the constitution of the Old Warrior and Clay Club of Hollidaysburg (1844), with 148 signatures and the minutes of the meetings, March through August, 1844; a map of Texas drawn by the U.S. War Department (1844); a copy of the Williamsport Lycoming Free Press (1836 July 9).

For the period 1846-1851, the correspondence bears upon details of Calvin's election to Congress in 1848, matters of patronage and other services to his constituents once he entered into office (especially military pension applications), Calvin's decision not to be a candidate in 1850, and issues from Blair Co., Pa., in particular. A series of letters in early 1846 concern measures taken to assure the passage through the Senate of a bill forming Blair Co. out of Bedford and Huntington counties.

Some reference is made in the letters to problems and politics. Letters from 1848 suggest Josiah Randall of Philadelphia as an excellent man for a position in President Taylor's cabinet. Several letters to Calvin in 1850-1851 contain references to the tariff, particularly advising increased dutied on iron. A long letter of 1850 July 11 concerns the Compromise of 1850, with the writer predicting that if the compromise failed and California were admitted to the Union, the result would be "disunion and civil war." A letter from 1860 March 2 states that people were much in favor of the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and that slavery, not the tariff, was the primary political issue.

Calvin expressed his views on slavery and its expansion into the territories in a letter from 1848 Oct. 3: he was, he wrote, opposed to slavery as an institution in general, and to the Missouri Compromise in particular. Miscellaneous items of this type include: notes of lectures (1850) and drafts and printed copies (1860) of speeches given by Calvin on the subject of the tariff; copies of supplements of the Hollidaysburg Register (1880 June 16 and Oct. 1) containing articles written by Calvin on the currency question.

Numerous references (1859-1860, 1867) in the letters to Calvin's participation in state politics and elections after 1861 show that he remained influential in Pa. There is no indication, however, of his role in the state constitutional convention of 1872-1873. Nor does the Civil War receive mention. There is a muster roll of the 2nd Regt., Pa. Vols (1847), stationed in Mexico. A letter of 1867 Oct. 30 speaks enthusiastically of the potential development of Washington, D.C., after the Civil War as a commercial and industrial center.

Noticeable are Calvin's business activities after 1850. He invested money in a great variety of new enterprises: Patton's Ville and Woodberry Turnpike Road Co. (1854); Morrison's Cove Turnpike Road Co. (1852); Hollidaysburg and Bedford Plank Road Co. (1853); Hollidaysburg Altoona Plank Road Co. (1854); Juniata Steam Boat Co. (1864); Hollidaysburg Gas Co. (1856); Hollidaysburg and Bennington Railroad and Mining Co. The collection contains 2 mortgages (1864) of this last company, as well as Calvin's shares in most of the others. In 1856 he purchased lands in Hardin and Muscatine counties, Iowa. He sold these properties in 1866-1867, evidently for a large profit. Calvin was interested in mining, primarily, and therefore in lands containing mineral deposits.

A series of letters (1881 Oct.-1883 Dec.) concern the Rico Reduction and Mining Co. Samuel Calvin was vice-president. Letters from Rico, Co., report on the wealth of silver, salt, and sulphur deposits in that area; describe the processes used for the mining and smelting of silver; discuss expenses and profits, labor problems, incidents in the life of a mining camp, and legal troubles with claims. The collection also includes maps, deeds, and charters from the Rico Reduction and Mining Co., as well as income and special tax receipts for Calvin from the year 1863-1871.

Miscellaneous items in the collection include: single copies of various newspapers; printed materials and circulars; small account books; maps of land holdings in Pa.; clippings.