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Collection
Col. David S. Wilson (1825-1881), originally from Ohio, was a lawyer and editor in Dubuque, Iowa. He served with the Sixth Cavalry of Iowa from 1862-1864 and also practiced law in San Francisco and Washington, D.C., during the 1860s and 1870s. He was appointed circuit judge and district judge in Dubuque and served until 1878. He and his wife, Henrietta, had four children: Henry, Gertrude, John, and David. The family's papers consists largely of personal correspondence between D.S. and Henrietta, as well as a significant amount of correspondence between the couple and their children. Also included in the collection are a selection of D.S. Wilson's legal and political materials, such as a diary from his 1860 term in the Iowa General Assembly, miscellaneous court case briefings, and some materials from his work as an attorney for the New Idria Quicksilver Mining Company.

The Col. David S. Wilson Family Papers document the activities of Col. David S. Wilson and his family of Dubuque, Iowa, from the mid-1850s through the early 1870s. The majority of the collection consists of the family’s correspondence. David and his wife, Henrietta, wrote frequent letters during his many absences from Dubuque; both parties are well-represented in the family's papers. Topics tended to center on the family's finances, personal and family news, and local events. Col. D.S. Wilson's military service during the 1860s was only mentioned in passing, as it related to the family's travels or finances. Later letters from D.S. Wilson's time in San Francisco discuss court cases and business news, and include details on family disputes between David and his brother Samuel M. Wilson, also a lawyer. D.S. Wilson repeatedly wrote about his unhappiness at being separated from his family in San Francisco. He finally returned to Dubuque to practice law there and in Washington, D.C.

Other major sources of correspondence are the couple's four children, particularly Henry (called "Harry") and Gertrude (called "Gertie") Wilson, who spent time at Kenyon College in Ohio and Brooke Hall in Pennsylvania. Henry and Gertrude regularly wrote home to their parents and included news about their activities and classmates. Nearly all of the collection's letters from 1873 and 1874 are directed to Gertie, who was actively courted by several men. Gertrude's suitors between 1870 and 1874 include James S. Donnell (Pittsburgh), John H. Rutherford (Cincinatti), Alonzo E. Wood (Dubuque), James H. Park, Charles Plunkett, and George Brock (Chicago); she eventually married Brock on March 2, 1874. The Wilsons' third child, John, appears to have attended school in Dubuque; letters between him and his classmates are also present in the collection and include many secret messages, codes, and nicknames. "Johnnie" was regularly referred to as the Champion Flirt of Iowa. Only a few letters remain for the youngest son, David Jr., nicknamed "Dada."

The collection includes interesting political and legal documents. A diary kept by Wilson in 1860 records his activities as a state representative in the Iowa General Assembly. Also present are miscellaneous materials from some of D.S. Wilson's court cases, including several from the U.S. District Court of Southern California relating to the case McGarrahan vs. the New Idria Quicksilver Mining Company. Wilson's materials also contain a cipher that appears to relate to that case, including code names for various parties and terms. There is also a 1855 General Land Office certificate for D.S. Wilson, signed by President Franklin Pierce.

Collection
A collection of letters to Eastman from civil engineer Charles Sloane; journalist and social reformer Paul Underwood Kellogg; drama critic Clayton Meeker Hamilton; Eastman's secondary school friend Ida Langdon; an unidentified friend, Summer Robinson, and various other people (including Eastman's sister, Dorothy). Includes a folder of poetry and literature sent to Eastman by unidentified correspondents. There are no letters by Eastman in the collection.

Collection of letters to Eastman from civil engineer Charles Sloane; journalist and social reformer Paul Underwood Kellogg; drama critic Clayton Meeker Hamilton; Eastman's secondary school friend Ida Langdon, who was attending Bryn Mawr; an unidentified friend, Summer Robinson, and various other people (including Eastman's sister, Dorothy). The primary topic of the letters is the individual correspondent's relationship with Eastman; many are love letters. Includes a folder of poetry and literature sent to Eastman by unidentified correspondents. There are no letters by Eastman in the collection.

Collection
Eugene and Margaret Triman both served in the United States military during World War II; Eugene was a sailor and was stationed on submarines, and Margaret was a member of the Women's Army Corps. The majority of this collection consists of Eugene's letters to Margaret while the couple was dating and engaged to marry. There are also five photographs of their wedding day, in April 1946, as well as some newspaper clippings about Margaret's WAC service and two booklets on birth control.

The collection consists largely of correspondence from Eugene Triman to Margaret Bond between December 1944 and April 1946. It is unclear how the couple met, but early letters indicate that Margaret was originally dating another man, "Bert." By August 1945, Eugene and Margaret had begun dating, and by February 1946 they were engaged. There are a few letters from Margaret to Eugene in the weeks leading up to their marriage. Their wedding occurred in late April or early May, 1946. The last letter in the collection is from Margaret's mother in May 1946, wishing the couple a happy married life and enclosing photographs of the wedding ceremony.

Most letters are from Eugene to Margaret, and largely center on his affection and love for her. He writes intimately about their relationship, and discusses their future, his expectations of her as his wife, his sexual desires, their need for birth control and contraceptives once married, his conversion to Catholicism, and his plans for employment and education following his discharge from the U.S. Navy. Other topics of interest are his activities and Navy life aboard submarines, particularly the USS Howard Gilmore, and his various deployments in New York, Florida, and other locations which were classified.

Margaret's letters to Eugene center largely on the logistics of their wedding, particularly the requirement of a blood test in order to receive their marriage license.

Other items in the collection are three clippings from local newspapers announcing Margaret's deployment as a servicewoman in the Women's Army Corps, dating from August 1944.

Collection

George E. Scott papers, 1854-1910 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — approx. 721 Items

Correspondence, photographs, printed material, legal papers, and a journal, relating to the personal and business life of George E. Scott, buyer and seller of lumber in Ala. and Fla. Some material also concerns the Perdido Bay Lumber Company in Pensacola, Fla. Includes a journal Scott kept (1873-1874) while on a ship carrying lumber and naval stores from Boston to Florida. Also includes two years of courtship letters while Scott was in England.

Collection

James Burt Jones Jr. papers, 1893-1922 0.8 Linear Feet — 600 Items

James Burt Jones was originally from Batavia, N.Y., and served as a paymaster in the U.S. Navy during World War I. Collection consists largely of letters from women addressed to Jones during his service in World War I. Also includes a small amount of correspondence from his family and male friends, as well as a variety of photographs, invitations, and other printed material.

The James Burt Jones Jr. Papers contain correspondence addressed to Jones, who is referred to alternatively as James, Jim, Burt, and occasionally Dave. The letters date from 1906-1919, with the majority of the letters dated to 1918. The folders are arranged chronologically by month and year.

Jones, who was originally from Batavia N.Y., was a paymaster in the U.S. Navy during World War I and the letters are addressed to him while he was stationed at various locations including New York City, Washington D.C., Akron N.Y., and Erie P.A. Several letters date from his time in Ann Arbor, where he was a student at the University of Michigan. Some of the correspondence is from Jones's family and male friends, but it is primarily written by female correspondents located in Rochester N.Y., Ann Arbor, Detroit, Brooklyn, Chicago, Erie, and Buffalo N.Y. Many of these letters are from a woman named Florence, who alternatively signs as "Happy" or "Bee," a kindergarten teacher with whom Jones was romantically involved. Other letters are written by a woman named Esther, who was Jones's classmate at University of Michigan, and who provides numerous insights into the lives of female university students.

These letters express the correspondents' sorrow at Jones's departure, wishes for his safe return, questions and fears about the war, and inquiries as to his exact whereabouts and intentions. They also provide interesting insights into the politics and culture of the United States in the early twentieth century. Letters refer to the Temperance Movement (April 17, 1918), Women's Suffrage (April 17, 1918, among others), the Armistice (November 12, 1918), German-American families with sons fighting on both sides of the war (April 28, 1917), as well as to current films and other popular topics. One letter, from Jones Jr.'s father to his mother, dates from 1898. The collection also contains several photographs of the correspondents and various printed invitations to parties and dances.

The collection includes one folder of postcards, letters, birth announcements, and other small cards addressed to various other individuals apparently unrelated to Jones, many of whom are located in Batavia N.Y. This correspondence dates from approximately 1893 to 1922. Several of these letters are written by children in Los Angeles to their grandmother in N.Y.

Collection
This collection contains the correspondence of Martha Eleanor Booker and her future husband Paul David Simpson from 1948-1952 and relates their struggles in school and as a couple during this time. Both were African-Americans from Virginia.

The correspondence between Martha and Paul D. Simpson, an African American couple from Virginia, spans their time spent earning teaching degrees (1948-1952) and details not only their personal lives, but also discusses work, religion, race, and their education. The couple eventually married. The letters document daily life, their relationship, and their struggles in school, life and on the job market. Paul sometimes refers to Martha as "Booker" or "Cherie." Martha often calls Paul "Button."

Collection
William H. Scovill (1796-1854) of Waterbury, Connecticut, businessman and founder of the Scovill Manufacturing Company; and Rebecca Beecher (1800-1876), of Kent, Connecticut. The collection includes twenty-nine letters, chiefly the courting letters of William H. Scovill and Rebecca Beecher during a long period of geographic separation and secret engagement from 1817 to 1820. Materials in the collection range in date from 1816 to 1864.

The collection includes twenty-nine letters, chiefly the courting letters of William H. Scovill and Rebecca Beecher during a long period of geographic separation and secret engagement from 1817 to 1820. Also included are four letters to Rebecca from acquaintances including William's sisters, Caroline and Sarah; one letter from William to his brother, James; and one unrelated letter written in 1864? to a Miss Fannie R. Sissons. The letters between William and Rebecca are roughly balanced in number, at first alternating between the two until March of 1818. Thereafter, only Rebecca's letters to William are included in the collection until June of 1819, and only William's letters to Rebecca are included from August, 1819, until August, 1820, although it is clear they each continued to receive replies from the other.

William and Rebecca wrote to each other about their letter writing; their own social life, activities, and plans; and the activities and temperament of mutual acquaintances. Whereas William writes openly of his love for Rebecca and his hope of becoming worthy to be her public suitor, Rebecca's letters are more circumspect, although encouraging in her professed pleasure at receiving his letters and concern for his well-being as he deals with homesickness and loneliness. In November of 1818, Rebecca writes of reports she received concerning William's behavior in Pennsylvania. She claims not to believe the rumors, but cautions him that it is important to associate with reputable people. Although in August of 1820, William is still clearly hopeful in his letter and addresses her as "My Dear Rebecca," the next and last related letter in the collection is from Sarah and Caroline Scovill to Rebecca, congratulating her profusely on her marriage to Mr. Foote.

Collection

Walter J. Taylor papers, 1934-2000 3 Linear Feet — Approx. 1950 Items

Walter J. Taylor was incarcerated at San Quentin and Folsom prisons from 1968 to 1973. While in jail, he founded the Sisters of Motivation and the Community Concern for Prisoners organizations to help African American convicts. He was also arrested, but never charged, as a suspect in the "Stinky Rapist" crimes in Berkeley, California, from 1973 to 1978. Collection consists largely of materials from Taylor's time in prison and as a community activist, post-prison, in Berkeley, California, during the 1970s. The majority of the materials comprises Taylor's incoming correspondence during his incarceration, which includes letters from a variety of people, especially women participating as pen pals in the Sisters of Motivation organization. Other frequent writers are Taylor's girlfriends, family members, and community organizations that he had contacted regarding his imprisonment and the general condition of black male prisoners. Post-prison materials consist largely of letters of recommendation and thanks relating to his job as a youth counselor; creative writings and poems about black culture and beauty; business flyers for his music store; and Community Concern for Prisoners materials. Collection also includes several folders of news clippings, most of which relate to Taylor being the prime suspect for the "Stinky Rapist" crimes in Berkeley from 1973 to 1978. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

This collection consists of personal papers; prison and legal materials; post-prison materials; organizational papers; business flyers; community and campaign ephemera; creative works and writings by Taylor; correspondence; and news clippings.

Taylor's Personal Papers consist of items like his birth certificate, school diplomas, and certificates. These are the only materials in the collection that date from his childhood and youth. The Prison and Legal Materials Series includes items such as police reports and accounts of Taylor's burglary in 1967, San Quentin Inmate Advisory Council certificates, and grades from his classes at the prison's school. Though this is a small series, it offers insight into Taylor's activities while at the San Quentin and Folsom prisons from 1968-1973.

Post-Prison Materials include information about Taylor's activities following parole in 1973. His work for the Thresholds program is documented through letters of thanks from Oakland officials and school districts, as well as booklets about the program itself. Other materials include items from Taylor's post-prison job search, such as his work for KDIA radio. Later materials offer insight into Taylor's passions following his parole. There are several flyers and other promotional material for Taylor's record store, Oldies But Goodies, as well as documentation of a business loan. The series also documents the political scene of San Francisco in the 1970s, including rosters and candidate lists, materials from the Black Book business directory, and flyers from Taylor's run for the Oakland Community Action Agency's administrative board. This series also has the only portion of the collection dealing with Taylor's life post-1981; travel documents suggest that he was at least visiting the Caribbean in 1999-2000. Finally, there are some miscellaneous materials in this series, including flyers, leaflets, and other general materials that document life in the San Francisco area but do not relate specifically to Taylor's activities.

Materials in the Organizational Papers derive from the Sisters of Motivation, started by Taylor while in prison, and Community Concern for Prisoners, which he appears to have founded after his release from jail. This series includes sign-up sheets, letters of support from public officials and community members, and general information about the organizations. It also contains flyers and bulletins from the CCP's various events, including one with Maya Angelou and other prominent San Francisco artists and writers.

Taylor's Writings and Creative Works include a wide range of materials, beginning with poems and songs and ending with political reflections and essays on black culture. Common themes are the oppression that he faced in prison, the beauty of black women, and the struggle of African Americans for justice. Some of these materials were published as letters to the editor or as poems in black newspapers; others were simply compiled by Taylor into booklets.

The Correspondence Series comprises the largest part of the collection. The original order, based on the writer and recipient of the letter, has been retained. Most of the correspondence dates from Taylor's time in prison from 1968-1973, but there are letters from both before and after. The outgoing correspondence from his time in prison is divided into four parts. The first is Taylor's general correspondence with family, friends, community organizations, politicians, and potential employers. The other three groups consist of Taylor's letters to three girlfriends: Barbara Cheatem, Carolyn Kitson, and Alice/Betty Jo (her full name is not clear).

The incoming correspondence makes up the majority of the Correspondence series. Incoming letters are divided into: general correspondence; the Black Scholar organization; Bill and Ella Carter; Barbara Cheatem; Patricia Dickens; family members (including his parents and his children); Doris Johnson; Carlyn Kitson; his lawyers; public officials; Verdia Rhone; Allyna Robinson; Dorothy Rodgers; Jesse and Dottie Taylor (Taylor's sister and brother-in-law); Marie Taylor (Taylor's wife); and Joni Wetzcher. The "General" incoming file includes materials about Taylor's job search, his parole hearings, requests for help in getting divorced, and other materials about his health and well-being in prison. Topics of note in the letters from his lawyers and public officials include references to Taylor's protest against censorship of black newspapers and the invasion of prisoner privacy in the mail screening procedures, especially at Folsom Prison. The majority of women writing to Taylor pen pals from the Sisters of Motivation program.

The collection is rounded out by the News Clippings Series, most of which dates from Taylor's post-prison life. Some of the clippings are of Taylor's published letters to the editor or his poems; several are general black culture and society articles that do not appear to relate specifically to Taylor. The remainder of the clippings are coverage of the Stinky Rapist case, both from mainstream and black newspapers.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Collection
Dorothy Parker Maloff was an editor at McGraw-Hill, Whittlesey House, and Atheneum, as well as other publishing houses in New York City. Known to Styron as "Didi" Parker. Collection comprises letters William Styron sent to Parker while he was serving in the Marine Corps and stationed at Camp Lejune in North Carolina. Also includes letters he wrote to her in 1952 from London, Paris, and Rome after he won the Prix de Rome. In addition, there are postcards Styron wrote to her under an assumed name. Styron mainly writes about his love for Parker; other topics include his military activities and training, as well as his novels, other writing, and publications.

Collection comprises letters William Styron sent to Parker while he was serving in the Marine Corps and stationed at Camp Lejune in North Carolina. Also includes letters he wrote to her in 1952 from London, Paris, and Rome after he won the Prix de Rome. In addition, there are postcards Styron wrote to her under an assumed name. Styron mainly writes about his love for Parker; other topics include his military activities and training, as well as his novels, other writing, and publications.