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Roland Alston family papers, 1990-1991 and undated .6 Linear Feet

The Roland Alston family was an African American family residing in Durham, North Carolina. William Roland Alston, known as "Roland," became the head gardener for Mary Duke Biddle at Pinecrest and later for the Semans family at Les Terraces, both properties located in Durham. The collection comprises nine folders containing transcripts, some edited and some final, of eight oral history interviews Judy Hogan completed with Roland Alston. Also includes 5 black-and-white and 5 color (one hand colored) uncaptioned photographs, including individual and group portraits, presumably of members of the Roland Alston family.

The Roland Alston family papers comprise nine folders containing transcripts, some edited and some final, of eight oral history interviews Judy Hogan completed with Roland Alston. The original audio tapes or cassettes for the interviews are not included with the collection. Topics include his work for Mary Duke Biddle and the Semans family; growing up on a farm in Chatham County; Durham and regional businesses, especially those for gardeners; his family life; and his views on relationships between people, including employers and employees, men and women, and parent and child. Also includes 5 black-and-white and 5 color (one hand colored) uncaptioned photographs, including individual and group portraits, presumably of members of the Roland Alston family. The photographs range in size from 4 x 5 inches to 8 x 10 inches.

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Charlotte Brontë letter to Ellen Nussey, 1840 November 12 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Collection comprises a autographed letter (4 pgs., 19 cm x 23 cm) written by Charlotte Brontë to her lifelong friend Ellen Nussey on 1840 November 12, possibly from Yorkshire. Pages also hold sketches of her and of a horse head created by William Weightman (1814-1842), who was assistant curate to Patrick Brontë beginning in 1839. Topics include Weightman’s drawings; an invitation to her to provide entertainment; procuring students for a local school; and the abusive and dissolving relationship between Mr. Collins, who was a curate, and his wife. Includes Brontë’s negative assessment of Mr. Collins’ character. Collection includes a typescript transcription of the letter.

Collection comprises a autographed letter (4 pgs., 19 cm x 23 cm) written by Charlotte Brontë to her lifelong friend Ellen Nussey on 1840 November 12, possibly from Yorkshire. Pages also hold sketches of her and of a horse head created by William Weightman (1814-1842), who was assistant curate to Patrick Brontë beginning in 1839. Topics include Weightman’s drawings; an invitation to her to provide entertainment; procuring students for a local school; and the abusive and dissolving relationship between Mr. Collins, who was a curate, and his wife. Includes Brontë’s negative assessment of Mr. Collins’ character. Collection includes a typescript transcription of the letter.

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Crystal Eastman letters collection, 1896-1928 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet

A collection of letters to Eastman from civil engineer Charles Sloane; journalist and social reformer Paul Underwood Kellogg; drama critic Clayton Meeker Hamilton; Eastman's secondary school friend Ida Langdon; an unidentified friend, Summer Robinson, and various other people (including Eastman's sister, Dorothy). Includes a folder of poetry and literature sent to Eastman by unidentified correspondents. There are no letters by Eastman in the collection.

Collection of letters to Eastman from civil engineer Charles Sloane; journalist and social reformer Paul Underwood Kellogg; drama critic Clayton Meeker Hamilton; Eastman's secondary school friend Ida Langdon, who was attending Bryn Mawr; an unidentified friend, Summer Robinson, and various other people (including Eastman's sister, Dorothy). The primary topic of the letters is the individual correspondent's relationship with Eastman; many are love letters. Includes a folder of poetry and literature sent to Eastman by unidentified correspondents. There are no letters by Eastman in the collection.