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Armistead T. M. Filler papers, 1796-1945 6.4 Linear Feet — 4,821 Items

Lovettsville (Loudoun Co.), Va. resident. He was connected with the B. and O. Railroad Co., was a member of the Odd Fellows and the Democratic State Central Committee, and was treasurer of Loudoun Co. Collection contains personal and official correspondence, business papers, and family records. Much of the business correspondence deals with the sale and purchase of guano and the financial affairs of "Linden," the Filler estate. Filler was a livestock speculator, had interests in the marble business, silver mines, and livestock insurance. Included are letters from Woodrow Wilson, J.K. Vardaman, Gen. Marcus Wright, McAdoo, and other prominent national figures. There is also a manuscript account of the cavalry battle of Traveler's Station.

Collection contains personal and official correspondence, business papers, and family records. Much of the business correspondence deals with the sale and purchase of guano and the financial affairs of "Linden," the Filler estate. Filler was a livestock speculator, had interests in the marble business, silver mines, and livestock insurance. Included are letters from Woodrow Wilson, J.K. Vardaman, Gen. Marcus Wright, McAdoo, and other prominent national figures. There is also a manuscript account of the cavalry battle of Traveler's Station.

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James Olin Hobbs, Sr. papers, 1806-1916 5.8 Linear Feet — 655 Items

Correspondence, mercantile records, account books, bills and receipts, and voting registration certificates of Hobbs, his son James Olin Hobbs, Jr., businessmen of Alleghany and Augusta counties, Va., and the Hobbs family. Subjects include economic conditions in western Virginia, 1835-1875, and conditions in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, during the early Reconstruction period.

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John Flannery and Company was a partnership of commission merchants, of Savannah, Ga. and was originally known as L. J. Guilmartin & Co. The records become those of John Flannery and Co. comprised of John L. Johnson and John Flannery after June 1877. This collection contains business papers of L. J. Guilmartin & Co., 1867-1877, and after 1877, of John Flannery and Co., cotton factors, commission merchants, and agents for several manufacturing concerns. Correspondence, principally with merchants and farmers in Georgia and Florida, concerns the purchase and sale of cotton, and to a lesser extent, other commodities, loans on crops, prices of cotton and other commodities, a government tax on cotton, 1867, and speculation in cotton.

This collection contains business papers of L. J. Guilmartin & Co., 1867-1877, and after 1877, of John Flannery and Co., cotton factors, commission merchants, and agents for several manufacturing concerns. Correspondence, principally with merchants and farmers in Georgia and Florida, concerns the purchase and sale of cotton, and to a lesser extent, other commodities, loans on crops, prices of cotton and other commodities, a government tax on cotton, 1867, and speculation in cotton. Also included are bills and receipts, deeds for land sold in Florida and Georgia, copies of insurance policies, and the report of a suit, 1860s, brought against L. J. Guilmartin & Co. Scattered letters refer to Reconstruction, bankruptcy laws in Georgia, and trading through the Grange. Persons mentioned include Edward W. Drummond, John Flannery, and Lawrence J. Guilmartin.

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John Hook papers, 1737-1889 and undated 30 Linear Feet — Approx. 7392 Items

Scottish merchant and Tory, of Hale's Ford (Franklin Co.), Va. Letters, papers, and mercantile records belonging to John Hook of the mercantile firm of Bowker Preston, Hook's son-in-law, and Smithson H. Davis at Goose Creek, Bedford Co., Va.; and of a similar firm of Asa, Smithson H., and Alexander G. Holland and John D. Booth at Hale's Ford and Germantown, both in Franklin Co., the Holland family apparently being connected with the Hook family by marriage. John Hook's papers consist of daybooks, ledgers, letter books, and memoranda of his mercantile firm and its branch stores, as well as plantation and land records of his extensive holdings and genealogical materials. There is also information concerning sequestration proceedings brought against him by David Ross, a former business partner. The records span the last quarter of the eighteenth century and document the American colonial and post-revolutionary trade system. Records of Bowker Preston and Smithson Davis concern the operation of their mercantile firms, 1813-1830, and include information on goods purchased in Philadelphia, New York City, and Richmond and Lynchburg, Va., and on the tobacco trade in Virginia, especially the effects of the panic of 1819. Records of the Holland family consist of merchants' correspondence, ledgers, account books, and daybooks.

Letters, papers, and mercantile records of John Hook (1745-1808), wealthy Scottish merchant and Tory; of the mercantile firm of Bowker Preston, Hook's son-in-law, and Smithson H. Davis at Goose Creek, Bedford County, Virginia; and of a similar firm of Asa, Smithson H., and Alexander G. Holland and John D. Booth at Halesford and Germantown, both in Franklin County, the Holland family apparently being connected with the Hook family by marriage.

The records of John Hook are comprised of daybooks, ledgers, letter books, and memoranda of the mercantile firm of Ross and Hook at New London, Campbell County Virginia, 1771-1784, of branch stores at Bedford Court House and Falling River in Bedford County, and of John Hook's mercantile establishment in Hale's Ford from 1784 to 1808. These records reflect the nature of goods in common use, the volume of trade, the large trade in iron, the manufacture of plantation tools at Hook's blacksmith shop, and the operation of his distillery. Concerning the mercantile operations are various memoranda and notes kept by Hook relative to debts due him, places of abode of the debtors, and the type of security for the debts; schedule of court days in the various counties of Virginia; inventories of goods; and letters relative to the operation of his business. Many of the records reveal information on the operation of Hook's valuable plantations, two in Franklin County and one in Montgomery County; much concerning the purchase, prizing and shipment of tobacco, usually on the barter basis; and information on large-scale purchase of Revolutionary land warrants with long lists of land owned by Hook.

A great proportion of Hook's papers relate to sequestration proceedings brought against him by David Ross, his partner in business from 1771 until after the Revolution. Concerning the suit are numerous depositions, explanations, histories of the operation of the firm, letters, inventories, lists of questions to be asked of his lawyers (Edmund Randolph and Philip Norbonne Nicholas) and witnesses, copies of letters and documents, and petitions to the Court for various concessions. There are many papers and letters relative to Nanny Pegee's efforts to sue Hook for her freedom. Nanny Pegee had been held as a slave by Hook since 1787 and had brought suit against him in 1803. Hook's efforts to recover Nanny Pegee from Congressman George Hancock, with whom she stayed, are also documented. Included are long lists of slaves; many papers concerning Hook's determination to serve as administrator of the estate of an Englishman, Jeffrey Gresley, who had owed Hook a large sum; many papers concerning the suit of sequestration after Hook's death; papers dealing with the administration of Hook's estate; numerous depositions and other papers relative to the disposition of the estate of Henry Hook, son of John Hook; and letters discussing the Revolutionary War, fugitive slaves, and prominent political figures.

Included also are papers concerning Hook's troubles with the Bedford County Committee of Safety, and two letter books. The papers connected with the Committee of Safety consist of a summons, a rough draft of Hook's reply, his discharge from jail, his oath of allegiance, and others of a similar nature, all bearing on an accusation that Hook had disseminated pamphlets antagonistic to the American cause. The letter books, 1763-1784, contain much information on mercantile pursuits in colonial Virginia, Hook's partnerships, analyses of trade opportunities at various locations, and information on several Scottish merchants prominent in colonial Virginia and their connections in Scotland. Included also is much information concerning David Ross and his connections with Hook before the Hook-Ross suit was started. Among the letters is information on Hook's family life, his wife, his children, his father and his father's family in Scotland, and his brothers in Jamaica. Records centering around Bowker Preston and Smithson H. Davis pertain to the operation of mercantile establishments at Goose Creek and Falling River in Bedford County from 1813 until about 1830, with letters between the partners concerning goods purchased in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, New York City, and Richmond and Lynchburg, Virginia; the purchase, prizing, and sale of tobacco; and the disastrous effects of the panic of 1819. There are also inventories of goods, including one in 1819 which contains the titles of many books and different types and styles of merchandise in common use; ledgers, daybooks, and other mercantile records; and personal letters to Preston after the dissolution of the firm.

Records pertaining to the Holland family are, with the exception of a constable's records kept by Asa Holland while an officer of Franklin County, confined to correspondence, ledgers, account books, and daybooks for the mercantile firms of Asa and Smithson H. Holland and John D. Booth.

Included also are manuscript arithmetic books kept by Robert Hook, Peter D. Holland, and John Hook, Jr., and numerous volumes containing accounts of the Ross-Hook lawsuit. Scattered through the papers and memoranda are various recipes for the cure of rheumatism, an affliction of both Hook and Preston. Among the correspondence are a few perfunctory letters from James Innes, H. H. Leavitt, B. W. Leigh, P. N. Nicholas, and Edmund Randolph. Included also are numerous documents signed by W. W. Hening and copies of Hook's letters and legal documents concerning the Ross-Hook suit.

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William Sigler papers, 1825-1855 2.5 Linear Feet — 1300 Items

Resident of Mount Jackson, Va. Collection contains personal correspondence, business papers, and receipts relating to William Sigler. Some correspondence concerns local politics and economic conditions. Sigler sometimes corresponded with prominent merchants in Baltimore, Md.

Collection contains personal correspondence, business papers, and receipts relating to William Sigler. Some correspondence concerns local politics and economic conditions. Sigler sometimes corresponded with prominent merchants in Baltimore, Md.