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Bryant Bennett was a merchant and planter residing in Williamston, North Carolina (in Martin County). This collection contains correspondence and papers of Bryant Bennett and of his family. Included are mercantile accounts of the firms of Bennett and Hyman in Williamston, N.C. and of Bennett and Price in Hamilton (both places in Martin County), school letters from a normal school in Oxford, North Carolina, deeds, promissory notes, receipts for land sold for taxes, plantation account books containing household and farm accounts, lists of slaves and supplies issued to them, business records dealing with the marketing of cotton at Norfolk, Virginia, agricultural treatises by one S. W. Outterbridge of Martin County, and letters to Bennett after he had moved to Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1869.

This collection contains correspondence and papers of Bryant Bennett and of his family. Included are mercantile accounts of the firms of Bennett and Hyman in Williamston and of Bennett and Price in Hamilton (both places in Martin County), school letters from a normal school in Oxford, North Carolina, deeds, promissory notes, receipts for land sold for taxes, plantation account books containing household and farm accounts, lists of slaves and supplies issued to them, business records dealing with the marketing of cotton at Norfolk, Virginia, agricultural treatises by one S. W. Outterbridge of Martin County, and letters to Bennett after he had moved to Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1869.

Please note that all folder and item titles in this collection guide have been taken from card catalogs and other inventories created in the early 20th Century.

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Edwin Clark papers, 1798-1930 and undated 4.8 Linear Feet — 3,636 Items

Merchant, of Weldon (Halifax Co.), N.C. Records and business correspondence of a general merchant of Weldon, N.C., together with daybooks (1880-1918) and ledgers (1878). Also includes a letter from Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va., concerning a son in college; and a letter from an instructor at Oak Ridge Military Institute, Guilford Co., N.C. (1917).

Records and business correspondence of a general merchant of Weldon, N.C., together with daybooks (1880-1918) and ledgers (1878). Also includes a letter from Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va., concerning a son in college; and a letter from an instructor at Oak Ridge Military Institute, Guilford Co., N.C. (1917).

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Fowler family papers, 1779-1870 4.2 Linear Feet — 9 Boxes; 1 volume

Included in this collection are records, 1779-1809, of a mercantile business run by Stephen Fowler, Fairfield, Connecticut, and after 1805 of Trenton, Jones Co., North Carolina, which engaged in trade between New York and North Carolina. Stephen's son Joseph about 1820 engaged in the export of lumber, naval stores, tobacco, grain, and blackeyed peas from North Carolina to Bermuda; and later in coastal trade from New Bern to New York. There is also correspondence relating to his duties as U.S. deputy marshal, Pamlico District, N.C., 1831-1860. Family correspondence predominates between 1840 and 1860. For the Civil War years there are many letters from Joseph S. Fowler, Jr., written largely from the Confederate Commissary Office, Kinston, N.C. The collection also includes two Yale university diplomas; a ledger of Joseph S. Fowler, (1817-1834), 1836, 1866, 1 vol.; financial and legal papers, 1800-1860; the logbook of Absalom Fulford kept on the Neuse River lightship, 1845-1849, recording weather and the passage of ships; and business letters to DeWitt C. Fowler and Brother, Bay River (N.C.) general store and liquor merchants.

The Fowler family papers collection Includes records, 1779-1809, of a mercantile business run by Stephen Fowler, Fairfield, Connecticut, and after 1805 of Trenton, Jones County, North Carolina, which engaged in trade between New York and North Carolina. Stephen's son Joseph, about 1820, engaged in export of lumber, naval stores, tobacco, grain, and blackeyed peas from North Carolina to Bermuda; and later in coastal trade from New Bern to New York. There is also correspondence relating to his duties as U.S. deputy marshal, Pamlico District, North Carolina, 1831-1860. Family correspondence predominates between 1840 and 1860. For the Civil War years there are many letters from Joseph S. Fowler, Jr., written largely from the Confederate Commissary Office, Kinston, North Carolina.

The collection also includes diplomas; a ledger of Joseph S. Fowler, (1817-1834), 1836, 1866, 1 vol.; financial and legal papers, 1800-1860; broadsides concerning state policies; the logbook of Absalom Fulford kept on the Neuse River lightship, 1845-1849, recording weather and the passage of ships; certificates for jurors, U.S. District Court, New Bern, 1839-1858; business letters addressed to DeWitt C. Fowler and Brother at Bay River, 1860-1868, a general store and liquor dealer; and a few items relating to North Carolina schools. Among correspondents in the collection are Silvester Brown, Benjamin Q. Tucker, Absalom Fulford, and Wesley Jones.

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James Redding Grist Business records, 1780-1920 5 Linear Feet — 3,269 Items

Correspondence, accounts, manifests, and other papers, of James Redding Grist, his father, Allen Grist, and of other members of the family. Materials relate to the operation of a general store, trade with the West Indies, Richard Grist's export business in New Bern, N.C., J. R. Grist's turpentine business near Wilmington, N.C., and his efforts to revive his trade in naval stores after the Civil War. Includes taxation lists, ca. 1815-1816, for Beaufort Co., N.C. Correspondents include Henry Toole Clark. A bound volume (shelved and cataloged separately) contains entries relating to the operation of a North Carolina general store and an earlier similar operation in the West Indies. The first half of the volume comprises the Thomas Dickinson ledger from St. Eustatius, West Indies, 1780-1781, with entries documenting payments for rum, madeira, slave clothing, cheese, flour, twine, nails, brown sugar, needles, and other sundries. His relation, if any, to the Grists is not known. The second half of the volume comprises the ledger of Allen Grist of Washington, Beaufort County, NC, 1813-1816, with entries for food, spirits, building material, and other sundries. A few entries in each section record slave transactions: money lent for the purchase of slaves, money paid for their labor, or money received for the actual sale of slaves.

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Patrick H. Cain papers, 1783-1940 6 Linear Feet — Approx. 2,904 Items

Merchant, tobacco merchant, landowner, distiller, and State Representative, from Mocksville and Settle (Davie Co.), N.C. Personal, legal, business, and financial papers of Patrick H. Cain and the Cain family, from Davie County, N.C. Included are letters describing life and social customs in Georgia; the education of women; student life at Normal College (later Trinity College, then Duke University) and at the University of North Carolina; Western migration; prices of products and services, the value of slaves, and the wages of freedmen; and the life of Confederate soldiers and military actions at First Manassas and Gettysburg. Legal papers consist of land grants, deeds, mortgages, arrests and summonses for debts, promissory notes, and material relating to the administration of various estates. Financial records include tax receipts and accounts. There is one volume of patient accounts, 1906-1925, belonging to Dr. John Cain. Correspondents include George Burgess Anderson, Francis Asbury, Samuel Ashe, Kemp P. Battle, John Joseph Bruner, D. R. Bruton, Lyman Copeland Draper, David Moffatt Furches, William H. Hayes, William Hill, Hamilton C. Jones, Leonidas Polk, Zebulon Vance, and Jonathan Worth.

Personal, legal, business, and financial papers of the Cain family. Included are letters describing life and social customs in Georgia, 1824-1827; school life at girls' academies, 1843-1856, at Normal College (later Trinity College), 1855-1856, at a seminary, 1869, and at the University of North Carolina, 1871-1880; Western migration and Western lands; business methods; prices of products and services, the value of slaves, and wages and tenancy of freedmen; the life of Confederate soldiers, including accounts of military activities, especially First Manassas and Gettysburg, and comments on conditions in the army and on officers, Jefferson Davis, and Abraham Lincoln.

Legal papers consist of land grants, deeds, mortgages, arrests and summonses for debts, promissory notes, and material relating to the administration of various estates. There are broadsides concerning Jonathan Worth and W. W. Holden. Financial records consist of tax receipts; accounts, 1889-1895, kept in advertising booklets; and a ledger containing patient accounts, 1906-1925, belonging to Dr. John M. Cain, Patrick Cain's brother. There are many manuscript volumes in the collection, chiefly financial.

Correspondents include George Burgess Anderson, Francis Asbury, Samuel Ashe, Kemp P. Battle, John Joseph Bruner, D. R. Bruton, Lyman Copeland Draper, David Moffatt Furches, Will H. Hayes, William Hill, Hamilton C. Jones, Leonidas Polk, Zebulon Vance, and Jonathan Worth.

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Robert C. Poindexter papers, 1836-1871 1 Linear Foot — 29 items, 3 vols.

Robert C. Poindexter (d. 1885) was a merchant in eastern Yadkin County for many years. His general store at East Bend was listed in Branson's North Carolina Business Directory for 1867, 1869, 1872, and 1884. He and his store are also mentioned in William E. Rutledge, Jr.'s, An Illustrated History of Yadkin County (Yadkinville, 1965) in the section on East Bend. In 1857 Poindexter was listed in D. D. T. Leech's Post Office Directory as the postmaster at Red Plains.

Three account books, 1836-1860, are from Poindexter's mercantile businesses. At least two different partnerships are represented. There are some uncertainties about the exact locations and number of his stores. These ambiguities and the difficulties in identifying the volumes will require some explanation. All of the business activity took place in the eastern section of Yadkin County, the area of East Bend in the northeast, Huntsville in the southeast, and Red Plains in between. Red Plains, a locality no longer in existence, was close to present-day Enon (Rutledge, P. 77).

The earliest account book has two distinct sections. It was first used as Daybook, 1836, for a general store at Huntsville. The entries (135 pp.) date during January 22-September 20, 1836. The ownership of this store is not known. Notable customers included Col. Richard C. Puryear, Isaac Jarratt, and Thomas L. Clingman. The Clingmans, Poindexters, Puryears, and Jarratts were related, and all figure in this collection and also in the Jarratt-Puryear Family Papers. Tyre Glen was a customer, and this department also has a collection of his papers. There was a post office in the store, for there are many entries for postage. At that time Richard C. Puryear was postmaster at Huntsville.

The account book that includes the Daybook, 1836, was subsequently used as the Ledger, 1843-1848 (353 pp.), by the mercantile firm of Poindexter and Martin whose ownership has been identified through various notations. The initials "P and M" appear on the spine of the volume. An account on pp. 334-335 is labeled "Poindexter and Martin Bills." This account was continued from pp. 30-31 where it was labeled "R. C. Poindexter and T. S. Martin." The first entry in their account was on Nov. 1, 1843, for a large amount of goods purchased from "P and P" according to an inventory. The Ledger's accounts begin in Nov., 1843, so that it is clear that Poindexter and Martin began business in that month, probably as the successor of an earlier firm named "P and P." A note was given to J. H. P. for a large sum, so one of the earlier owners was probably J. H. Palmer. Various accounts have entries for settlements with "P and M" (pp. 37, 38) and "T. S. M." (pp. 33, 46, etc.). Poindexter worked in the store, for his account (p. 303) contains entries for annual wages.

The location of the general store represented by the Ledger, 1843-1848, is unclear. It was not at Huntsville, for there are too many scattered entries such as "cr. by charging on Books at Huntsville," "Cr. by Cash at Huntsville," "settled at Huntsville," etc. (pp. 117, 148, 178, 184, 195, 218, 244, etc.). These entries also suggest that the firm did have a store at Huntsville. Robert C. Poindexter eventually had a store at East Bend. However, this ledger was not kept at East Bend. That town did not have a post office until 1849, and numerous entries in many accounts show that the store included a post office. There are extensive accounts for Richard C. Puryear, Isaac Jarratt, and Tyre Glen.

Poindexter and Martin opened a new ledger in 1847, for many accounts were noted as continued there (pp. 65, 147, etc.). Some accounts in the Ledger, 1843-1848, remained active into 1848. Thereafter, later entries as late as 1855 were usually settlements of inactive accounts not continued into the later ledger.

The mercantile firm of A. P. and R. C. Poindexter had a general store at Red Plains, a village near Enon. The Daybook, 1857-1858, belonged to that store. Many pages are labeled "Red Plains." Identification of the store's and the volume's owners is supplied by a bill of 1856-1857 filed in the Financial Papers. The bill is a statement for purchases made by John D. Hedgcock and William Hedgcock at Red Plains from A. P. and R. C. Poindexter. The transaction for May 2, 1857, on the bill is also entered in the Daybook. The entries (66 pp.) in the Daybook date from April 30, 1857, to March 26, 1858.

On Sept. 26, 1860, the partnership of A. P. and R. C. Poindexter was dissolved, and the Daybook includes an account (4 pp.) for the division of property.

The back pages of the Daybook were used, probably by R. C. Poindexter, to record other financial matters. There are 10 1/2 pages, 1862-1863, of alphabetical lists of names followed by three columns for recording numbers of persons in the family, pounds, and value. These pages also include a short account for the receipt of large quantities of salt. It is apparent that these lists are for the distribution and rationing of salt. Salt was scarce, and the state set up factories, purchased salt, and sold it to the people. These accounts may relate to that effort. Since the number of persons in each family is recorded, these lists serve as a partial census. Unfortunately, many pages are missing. The Financial Papers also include a salt distribution list.

Another list (7 pp.) in the Daybook includes columns for names, acreage, location of acreage, and value. This list was apparently for taxation. The Financial Papers include a notice of March 20, 1863, that R. C. Poindexter and two others were appointed assessors for East Bend District for the listing of lands and slaves. Thus, this list is an informal tax list. Unfortunately, many pages are missing. Presumably this list dates from 1863 or later, and tax lists are unavailable for Yadkin County during 1863-1872 according to Draughon and Johnson's North Carolina Genealogical Reference (p. 452).

The Ledger, 1850-1860 (557 pp.), is identified as belonging to A. P. and R. C. Poindexter, because entries can be traced into it from their Daybook, 1857-1858. An example is a purchase by A. P. Poindexter that was entered in the Daybook on June 2, 1857, and later carried to his account in the Ledger (p. 542). However, the Ledger's account for Poindexter includes many transactions that are not in this Daybook from Red Plains. This circumstance and references in the Ledger to East Bend suggest that the firm had stores in more than one place - Red Plains, East Bend, and perhaps elsewhere. There are numerous references such as: "cr. by work at East Bend and here" (p. 364); "Amount on Book kept by R. C. P. at East Bend" (p. 488); "cr. by work at East Bend" (p. 450); "cr. by settlement, this and our East Bend book" (p. 541); etc. (pp. 427, 437, 478).

The location at which the Ledger was kept is not certain except that it was not at East Bend. The location may have been Red Plains. R. C. Poindexter was postmaster there in 1857, and his account in the Ledger was quite active then. There are references (p. 542) to transactions "at Huntsville" and "at Yadkinville," so the Ledger was not kept at either of those places. Of course, the Ledger may have been a central one into which the business of more than one store was entered, and that would make its location difficult to determine. Accounts for R. C. Puryear, Isaac Jarratt, and Tyre Glen are not prominent in this volume.

The Ledger, 1850-1860, was begun in 1850 with many accounts continued from an "Old Book." Thus, the firm existed before 1850 and had at least one earlier ledger. The accounts indicate that the store's activity ceased by early 1858. Later entries are for settlements of accounts. No accounts were marked as continued in a later ledger. This situation squares with the 1860 account in the Daybook, 1857-1858, for the dissolution of the partnership.

Transactions for postage (pp. 425, 426, 454) are rare unlike the situation in the Ledger, 1843-1848. Either the post office was not in the store, or other books were kept for postal matters.

The nine items, 1856-1871 and undated, in the Financial Papers include stray accounts for the stores, a salt distribution and rationing list of ca. 1862-1863, the notice of R. C. Poindexter's appointment as an assessor, etc.

The Miscellany includes 19 small squares of colored cotton cloth that were found between pages 387-388 of the Ledger, 1850-1860. The fabric was probably of a type used for dresses. There are six different designs. The designs are printed rather than woven. The fabric is in excellent condition. Its age is uncertain.

The Printed Material contains a clipping of 1852 with an advertisement for the Statesville Female Academy.

1 vol. added, 10-28-83. This volume is A. P. and R. C. Poindexter's Ledger, 1848-1850, from their general store. Accounts in this ledger, referred to as the "old book," are marked as continued in the "new book" which is their Ledger, 1850-1860, that was cataloged earlier as part of this collection. Entries can be traced from the older book into the newer one. Since Ledger, 1848-1850 (172 pp.), opens many accounts in Sept., 1848, without any references to an earlier ledger, that date must have been the start of this partnership, the earlier one having been Poindexter and Martin. A. P. and R. C. Poindexter began a new ledger in 1850, but they continued to use the old one for some accounts. For that reason Ledger, 1848-1850, includes some later transactions as well as settlements of accounts. The primary use of the volume, however, occurred during 1848-1850. A. P. and R. C. Poindexter's names appear in this volume (p. 83, page before p. 1, etc.) as recipients of payments. The pages after p. 165 are missing. There are accounts for Isaac Jarratt and Tyre Glen. Postage payments are very scattered. Customers paid their bills not only with money and promissory notes but also with goods and services.

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Tillinghast family papers, 1763-1971 15 Linear Feet — 4,910 items

Family from North Carolina, Virginia, and Massachusetts. Family and business letters, personal journals, deeds, legal items, and papers (chiefly 1830-1911) of William Norwood Tillinghast (b. 1831), merchant of Fayetteville, N.C.; William A. Norwood (d. ca. 1866), judge of Hillsboro, N.C.; and of the Tillinghast and Norwood families of Massachusetts, Virginia, and North Carolina. Contains information about the mercantile activities of the Tillinghast family; social life and customs in North Carolina before 1900; business and economic conditions in the South before, during, and after the Civil War; agriculture in the South Atlantic States before 1860; the secession of North Carolina; living conditions during the Civil War and Reconstruction; events of the war in North Carolina; the South during the late 19th century; and camp life during the Spanish American War. Correspondents include Kemp P. Battle and Henry Clay Robinson.

Personal, business, and legal papers of the Tillinghast family of Fayette ville, North Carolina, relating to family and business interests in New England, New York, North Carolina, and Georgia. Early corre spondence is chiefly with relatives in New England discussing cotton and tobacco prices and markets, relations with France and England, the effects of the embargo on mer chants in Taunton, Massachusetts, and social life and customs in North Carolina. There are also a copy of a letter, 1765, from Sir Francis Bernard, royal governor of Massachu setts, describing the turmoil in Boston and the activities of the Sons of Liberty; and a letter, 1781, from James Hogg requesting payment for supplies-taken from him by the army. Papers prior to 1850 focus principally on Samuel Willard Tillinghast (d. 1860), commission merchant, and his wife, Jane (Norwood) Tillinghast, daughter of Judge William A. Norwood (1774-1842) and Robina (Hogg) Norwood, (d. 1860) whom he married in 1830, dealing with mercantile accounts and business relations with firms in New York, New York, and Providence, Rhode Island; family matters; life in Chapel Hill, Hills borough, and Fayetteville, North Carolina; trips to New York to purchase goods for the store; the Protestant Episcopal Church; fires in 1831 and 1845 which destroyed Fayetteville; rumors in Fayetteville of slave insurrections in other parts of North Carolina; the settlement of the estate of William A. Norwood; education at the Virginia Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Staunton, Virginia, attended by Thomas Hooper Tilling hast (b. 1833), son of Samuel Tillinghast and Jane (Norwood) Tillinghast, and at the New York Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, New York, attended by Thomas Hooper Tillinghast and his brother, David Ray Tillinghast; social life, politics, financial affairs, and cotton planting in Georgia; yellow fever in Georgia; railroad construction in North Carolina and Georgia; the building of plank roads; private schools in Hillsborough and Fayetteville; the gingham School, Hillsborough, and later, in Mebane, North Carolina; the temperance movement, 1842; the Whigs and the Loco-Focos in North Carolina, 1840; the speeches of Louis D. Henry (1788-1846); and the growth of Fayetteville, its prospects, and need for expanded banking facilities.

Papers, 1850-1900, relate chiefly to the children of Samuel Willard Tillinghast and Jane (Norwood) Tillinghast, especially William Norwood Tillinghast, who first worked with his father, and then established Tillinghast's Crockery Store. The papers concern the Democratic and Whig conventions in 1852; the presidential election of 1852; Franklin Pierce and slavery; business, health and social life in Savannah, Georgia; studies, literary societies, and student life at Normal College (later Trinity College), Randolph County, North Carolina, 1853-1854; college life at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, during the 1850s, and the commencements of 1852 and 1856; the Nicholas Hotel in New York, New York, 1853; life in Liberia at Monrovia as described by a former slave; commencement at the Greensboro Female College (now Greensboro College), Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1856; efforts to send Episcopal missionaries to China; the Belmont Theological Seminary, Kentucky, and the Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary in Alexandria, Virginia; secession sentiment; the Constitution; the election of 1860; confusion in Washington, D.C., April, 1861; secessionists versus unionists in North Carolina; civilian life during the Civil War; the Emancipation Proclamation; life of a Confederate soldier, including food, casualties, blockade running, conscription, the progress of the war, preaching to troops, the battle of Gettysburg, use of observation balloons by the Union Army, and Sherman's march through Fayetteville and depredations by his troops; economic conditions after the war; conditions, conduct, and wages of freedmen; the Home Institute, Sumter, South Carolina, a school for freedmen; politics in North Carolina in 1868; Governor William W. Holden and the Radicals; Chapel Hill in 1868 after the suspension of the University; education of the deaf by Thomas Hooper Tillinghast, David Ray Tillinghast, and Sarah Ann Tillinghast; business trips to New York, New York; the movement of Davenport College, Lenoir, North Carolina, to Hickory, North Carolina, where it became Claremont College; the Spanish-American War, including mobilization, camp life, artillery school on Sullivan's Island (South Carolina), yellow fever, and camp on Tybee Island (Georgia); life in Washington, D. C., ca. 1900, including Marine Band concerts and government employment; and the visit of Queen Victoria to Dublin, Ireland.

Papers after 1900 are primarily those of Anne Troy (Wetmore) Tillinghast (d. ca. 1948), wife of John Baker Tillinghast (d. 1914), and of her daughter, Anne Wetmore Tillinghast, pertaining to public schools and education in North Carolina; various educational organizations such as the North Carolina Teachers' Assembly and the North Carolina State Primary Teachers' Association; nursing with the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe during World War I; United War Work Campaign; the Fourth Liberty Loan Drive; the Armistice celebration, the Protestant Episcopal Church, especially the 1920s through the 1940s; the Commission of Young People's Work in the Diocese of East Carolina; Young People's Conference, 1926; the Young People's Service League; St. Mary's School and Junior College, Raleigh, North Carolina; the Richmond (Virginia) Division of the College of William and Mary (now Virginia Commonwealth University); St. Paul's Girls' School, Baltimore, Maryland, where Anne Wetmore Tillinghast was recreational director; financial difficulties during the Depression; the Tar Heel Society of Maryland; the North Carolina Society of Baltimore; Anne (Wetmore) Tillinghast's membership on the Cumberland Board of Public Welfare, the board of trustees of the Fayetteville City Schools, and the Thompson Orphanage Jubilee Committee (Charlotte, North Carolina); labor and financial difficulties at the Erwin Cotton Mills, Erwin, North Carolina, and the 1934 strike; restoration of Bath, North Carolina; employment on the Works Project Administra-tion's recreational program; the recreation department of Fayetteville; the death of Anne (Wetmore) Tillinghast; life in the U. S. Foreign Service, 1962-1966, in Saudi Arabia, the Middle East, Egypt, India, and Sweden; and other personal and family matters.

Other papers and volumes include school exercises; essays by Samuel Willard Tillinghast on education in Fayetteville, the Female High School in Fayetteville, the militia, and John C. Calhoun; bills and receipts relating to the mercantile business of Samuel Willard Tillinghast; an account book, 1783, of an "Adventuring Company" with references to voyages to Jamaica, Hamburg, and Lisbon; an account book of the Ray family; Sunday school records of St. John's Episcopal Church, Fayetteville; journal, 1804 and 1816, of Paris Jencks Tillinghast, Sr., father of Samuel Willard Tillinghast, concerning life in early Fayetteville, tobacco, river traffic and warehouses, Scottish immigration, opposition to slavery, and his shipping interests; logbook, 1804, of Daniel Jencks Tillinghast (d. 1804), son of Paris Jencks Tillinghast, Sr., regarding a voyage to the Far East for coffee and sugar; journal, 1812-1813, of William Holroyd Tillinghast (d. 1813), son of Paris Jencks Tillinghast, Sr., concerning prices, embargoes, the scarcity of goods, orations at Fayetteville Academy in 1813, and military and naval actions; letter books, 1824-1831 and 1852-1861, of Samuel Willard Tillinghast regarding his mercantile business with northern companies, including the sale of cotton, tobacco, and beeswax and his partner ships with Cyrus P. Tillinghast and, later, with D. A. Ray; a sales book, 1832-1845, from the auctioneering firms of Thomas Sanford and Co. and Samuel Willard Tillinghast at Fayetteville, containing accounts for sales of a great variety of goods, the personal effects of Henry L. Jones and of Mrs. David Smith in 1833, and of slaves in 1832, a task book, 1849-1851, for turpentine operations relating to the use of slaves and purchases of clothing for them; invoice books, 1853-1861 and 1877-1880, of Tillinghast's Crockery Store operated by William Norwood Tillinghast; the journal,1861, of Emily Tillinghast, daughter of Samuel Willard Tillinghast, describing home life during the early months of the Confederacy; the funeral service of Edward Peet, teacher at the New York Institution for the Deaf and Dumb; the February, 1865, issue of The Fanwood Chronicle edited by David Ray Tillinghast at the New York Institution for the Deaf and Dumb; invoice books, 1866-1883, of the Fayetteville Gas Light Company of which William Norwood f Tillinghast was secretary and treasurer; photocopy of a letter (56 pp.) of Sarah Ann Tillinghast describing making clothing for the Fayetteville company of the 1st North Carolina Infantry during the Civil War, and detailing the activities of the Union soldiers when Sherman captured Fayetteville; an account by Robina Tillinghast of Sherman's march through Fayetteville; statement, 1892, of the Reverend Job Turner, a missionary among the deaf; account, 1926, of the founding and history of the North Carolina Historical Commission in which Susan (Tillinghast) West took part; two family Bibles; legal papers including wills, land deeds and indentures, and marriage bonds; financial papers, including receipts, profit and loss statements, and material regarding the life insurance policy of John Baker Tillinghast; papers relating to the estate of John H. Culbreth, 1930s; genealogical material; invitations; programs; funeral booklet; autograph album; records of St. John's Episcopal Church, 1930s and 1940s, of the St. John's Young People's Service League, and of the St. John's Woman's Auxiliary; writings and addresses; poetry; words to songs; religious writings, especially relating to St. John's Episcopal Church; clippings; annual celebrations of the battle of Moore's Creek; scrapbooks; notebooks; and pictures.

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Woody family papers, 1784-1939 9 Linear Feet — 2,389 Items

Family of Quaker merchants and millers residing in Guildford County, North Carolina, with relatives in Indiana and Montana Territory. Collection comprises a rich array of business and personal correspondence and other papers (chiefly 1835-1887) relating to Newton D. Woody, merchant and miller of North Carolina, his Civil War service, and his flight to Indiana in 1865 and eventual return to N.C.; the activities of Frank H. Woody, who traveled to and described life in the territories of Washington and Montana before and after the Civil War. There are also important materials regarding the Civil War and its aftermath, including descriptions of camp life by Confederate soldiers, one of whom was in the 21st North Carolina Regiment; experiences of Confederate soldiers in Union prisons at Johnson's Island, Ohio, and Elmira, New York, during the war; accounts of Reconstruction in Augusta, Georgia, given by a Union sympathizer, 1867-1868, as well as economic conditions in North Carolina before, during, and after the Civil War. There are also some documents and letters concerning African American life in the South before, during, and after the war. Printed matter in the collection relates to the activities of Unionists in North Carolina during the Civil War and opposition to Ulysses S. Grant and the Radicals. Other topics include the activities of Woody relatives who had migrated to Indiana; the activities of the children of Newton and of his brother, Robert Woody, postmaster, miller, and merchant; and the history of the Society of Friends in antebellum North Carolina. Includes legal documents, business records, and minutes of the Orange Peace Society, Orange County, N.C.

Papers of Robert Woody, Newton Dixon Woody, and other members of the Woody family include a rich trove of business and personal correspondence; legal and financial papers; printed materials; and manuscript volumes. The papers of this family concern the mercantile and milling businesses of Robert Woody in Chatham County, North Carolina, and Newton Dixon Woody in Guilford County, North Carolina, in the 1850s; the decision of Newton D. Woody to leave North Carolina during the Civil War and his return in 1865; experiences of Frank H. Woody, a lawyer and clerk, in the Washington and Montana territories in the 1860s and 1870s, in which he mentions clashes with Native Americans and settlers, and reports seeing Sherman in 1878. There are also letters with news from relatives living in Indiana.

Other papers include information about temperance meetings, including the General Southern Temperance Conference at Fayetteville, North Carolina, 1835; hog droving; commodity prices in the last half of the 19th century; general economic conditions in North Carolina and the United States in the 19th century; the upkeep of roads in Guilford County; and the experiences of Mary Ann Woody as a student at New Garden Boarding School, Guilford County, 1852-1853. In addition, there is a bill of sale for slaves and a letter from Alabama describing African American celebrations at Christmas, 1857.

There are also important materials regarding the Civil War and its aftermath, including descriptions of camp life by a soldier in the 21st North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War; experiences of Confederate soldiers in Union prisons at Johnson's Island, Ohio, and Elmira, New York, during the war; and accounts of Reconstruction in Augusta, Georgia, given by a Union sympathizer, 1867-1868. Printed matter in the collection relates to the activities of Unionists in North Carolina during the Civil War and opposition to Ulysses S. Grant and the Radicals. There is also a May 1865 letter saying that John Gilmore of N.C. was dividing land with freed African Americans, and a letter mentioning African American violence during elections in an unspecified state in Dec. 1870.

Volumes in the collection include minutes of meetings of the Orange Peace Society, Orange County, North Carolina, 1824-1830; memorandum books; an account book kept during the construction of a Quaker church at High Falls, North Carolina, 1905-1909; minute book of meetings of the Friends of Prosperity, 1913-1914. Other papers in the collection mention camp meetings and religious revivals in North Carolina and their effect on Quakers. There are also financial record books of Robert Woody and Newton Dixon Woody.