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Edmund Snare papers, 1836-1867 0.8 Linear Feet — 4 items

Edmund Snare was a physician and resident of Huntingdon (Huntingdon Co.), Pennsylvania. Collection comprises a ledger (dated 1836-1867) and three documents, including a letter (1864 January 19) appointing Edmund Snare as an examining surgeon of the Pension Office; a printed document (dated 1864-1866) with a handwritten list of pensioners he examined; and a letter (July 1866) from Snare to pensioner John Horst requesting more details regarding his injury, with Horst's responses. The last portion of the ledger (approximately 53 pages) contains Snare's records regarding his examinations of soldiers, primarily from Pennsylvania regiments, who had been discharged for various injuries and diseases from both the Civil and Mexican wars. The ledger was initially used (118 pages) to record transactions for a mercantile business belonging to another Edmund Snare, presumably a relative of Dr. Snare.

Collection comprises a ledger (dated 1836-1867) and three documents, including a letter (1864 January 19) appointing Edmund Snare as an examining surgeon of the Pension Office; a printed document (dated 1864-1866) with a handwritten list of pensioners he examined; and a letter (July 1866) from Snare to pensioner John Horst requesting more details regarding his injury, with Horst's responses. The last portion of the ledger (approximately 53 pages) contains Snare's records regarding his examinations of soldiers, primarily from Pennsylvania regiments, who had been discharged for various injuries and diseases from both the Civil and Mexican wars. One soldier was from New York, one from Illinois, and one was an African American with the 32d Regt. U.S. Colored Troops. Entries recorded the soldier's name, home town, regiment and immediate commanding officer, as well as the attorney representing the soldier in his petition. Sometimes the battle in which the injury was received is mentioned, including Antietam, Gettysburg, and Cold Harbor; other notes mention men who were captured and sent to Confederate prisons, including Andersonville. Snare then provided a detailed medical description of the injury or wound and any resulting damage. Several of the men had contracted diseases while on duty, such as typhoid or tuberculosis, had sustained hernias or were sidelined by rheumatism, but most of the men suffered gunshot wounds or injuries from cannon fire. In the margins Snare recorded his estimates for awarding a pension, according to guidelines set by the Pension Office. Some of the soldiers were examined annually or biennially over the course of three years, to reassess their continued eligibility.

The ledger was initially used (118 pages) to record transactions for a mercantile business belonging to another Edmund Snare, presumably a relative of Dr. Snare. This Edmund Snare of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, and New York, sold goods such as coffee, flour, wine, tea, dried fruit, and Cuban tobacco, among other items, and purchased goods from a variety of firms. Includes an alphabetical listing of his customers; along with records of expenditures, invoices, and sales; and tabulations of profits, primarily between May and July 1836. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collection.

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William Law papers, 1761-1890 2.4 Linear Feet — 4 boxes, 1,863 items (including 20 vols.)

Collection has personal and business correspondence of William Law, the Dubose family, and of Cyrus Bacot, with whom Law was connected by marriage. As captain of the Black Creek Militia, 1813-1820, Law's papers include muster rolls, accounts of courts-martial, lists of absentees with their excuses, and numerous orders. Law's plantation records are confined to frequent lists of slaves, accounts of cotton planted and produced, and weights of hogs killed. The bulk of the papers is concerned with Law's activities as a merchant in partnership with Daniel Dubose, include records of large amounts of cotton sold to Charleston commission merchants, of turpentine and bricks sold, and papers, bills, receipts, account books, daybooks, cashbooks, and ledgers. Included also are an account book of lumber sold by Law and Bacot, and letters and papers showing Law's activities in the temperance movement and the Presbyterian Church. Personal letters, mostly post 1839, include letters of sympathy at the death of Law's wife in 1839, frequent letters from member of the Cooper and Dubose families, and letters from Law's brother, James Robert Law, who was often in financial difficulties. J. R. Law was a planter in the Sumter District of South Carolina and in Madison County, Fla., after 1848. Miscellaneous materials include a description of the Alabama River and environs, 1815, accounts of trips to Red Sulphur Springs and other springs in Virginia, 1835, and Civil War letters from William Law's son discussing camp life.

This collection contains personal and business correspondence and papers of William Law (1792-1868), planter, merchant, and leader of the local militia, the DuBose family, and of Cyrus Bacot, with whom Law was connected by marriage.

As captain of the Black Creek Militia, 1813-1820, Law's papers include muster rolls, accounts of courts-martial, lists of absentees with their excuses, and numerous orders. Law's plantation records are confined to frequent lists of slaves, accounts of cotton planted and produced, and weights of hogs killed. The bulk of the papers is concerned with Law's activities as a merchant in partnership with Daniel DuBose, including records of large amounts of cotton sold to Charleston commission merchants, of turpentine and bricks sold, and papers, bills, receipts, account books, daybooks, cashbooks, and ledgers.

Also included in the collection are an account book of lumber sold by Law and Cyrus Bacot, and letters and papers showing Law's activities in the temperance movement and the Presbyterian Church. Personal letters, largely confined to the period after 1839, fall into three categories; letters of sympathy at the death of Law's wife in 1839; frequent letters from members of the Cooper and DuBose families; and letters from Law's brother, James Robert Law, who was often involved in financial difficulties. Letters from James Robert Law are concerned with planting operations in Sumter District, South Carolina, and, beginning with 1848, in Madison County, Florida.

There are also a description of the Alabama River and its fertile lowlands by William I. DuBose written from Fort Claiborne, Monroe County, Mississippi, in 1815; accounts of a trip to Red Sulphur Springs as well as other springs in Virginia in 1835; a long account by James R. Law relative to a marl bed on his Sumter plantation, and Civil War letters from William Law's son revealing numerous incidents of camp life.