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Edward H. Chamberlin (1899-1967) was an economist and professor at Harvard University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, and items of a personal nature.

The Edward H. Chamberlin papers document his career as an economist and professor. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on topics such as monopolistic competition, market structure, pricing behavior, economies of scale, and collective bargaining, among others. The collection also documents his correspondence with prominent economists and individuals such as Marice Allais, Luigi Einaudi, Dwight Eisenhower, Howard S. Ellis, Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Gottfried Haberler, Frank Hahn, Roy Harrod, Friedrich A. Hayek, Richard Kahn, Nicholas Kaldor, Frank Knight, Emil Lederer, Wassily Leontief, Abba Lerner, Gertrud Lovasy, Fritz Machlup, Hans Neisser, J. F. Normano, Francois Perroux, Dennis H. Robertson, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, Thomas Schelling, Robert Schuman, Joseph Schumpeter, Ben Seligman, George Stigler, Frank Taussig, Gerhard Tintner, Jaroslav Vanek, Jacob Viner, and many others.

Along with his scholarship and writings, the collection documents Chamberlin's roles in the American Economic Association, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Council of Economic Advisers, and the Rockefeller Foundation project to aid refugee scholars fleeing Europe during the 1930s; his editorship of the Quarterly Journal of Economics; his speaking engagements; expert testimony in legal proceedings and before houses of the United States Congress; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions at Harvard. The collection also contains personal artifacts documenting Chamberlin's service in the National Guard during World War 1, his service as a member of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during World War 2, as well as awards and honorary degrees.

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Herbert Scarf papers, 1951-2015 33 Linear Feet — 22 boxes — .684 Megabytes — 3 floppy disks with 11 files (one disk unreadable)

Herbert Scarf (1930-2015) was an economist and mathematician, and worked as a professor of economics at Yale University and the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings, as well as his collaborations and professional affiliations across the fields of economics, mathematics, and operations research. Includes a small group of electronic files; computations and other technical data contained in these files may be available in the form of printouts in the collection's research files. Acquired as part of the Economists' Papers Archive at Duke University.

The Herbert Scarf Papers document his career as an economist and mathematician. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the computation of economic equilibrium and fixed points, stability of general equilibrium, the core of many-person games and its relation to general equilibrium, integer programming, and problems of production with indivisibilities. Much of Scarf's work serves as the basis for applied general equilibrium models, and as a precursor to modern computational and simulation approaches to economics.

The collection also documents Scarf's collaboration and communications with prominent economists and mathematicians such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, Ralph Gomory, Terje Hansen, Werner Hildenbrand, Tjalling Koopmans, Harold Kuhn, Lloyd Shapley, John Shoven, Martin Shubik, John Whalley, and many others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Scarf's leadership roles in the American Economic Association, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and other organizations; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions in the economics, operations research, and applied mathematics programs at Yale University.

Includes a small group of electronic files originally on floppy disks created in the 1980s, which have been migrated to a library server. Computations and other technical data contained in these files may be available in the form of printouts in the collection's research files.

Acquired as part of the Economists' Papers Archive at Duke University.

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Raymond C. Battalio and John B. Van Huyck papers, 1972-2014 and undated 97.5 Linear Feet — 65 boxes — 150 Gigabytes

Raymond C. Battalio (1938-2004) and John B. Van Huyck (1956-2014) were experimental economists and worked together as professors of economics at Texas A & M University. This collection consists of their correspondence, research, writings, and experiment files.

The Raymond C. Battalio and John B. Van Huyck Papers document their careers as economists at Texas A & M University. The collection provides an overview of their professional activities, particularly their work as experimental economists and influential figures in developing the field of experimental economics during the 1990s. The papers of Battalio and Van Huyck are combined as one collection given their close working relationship. Their joint work focused on a series of experiments showing the likeliness of coordination failures even when incentives guide participants to attempt to coordinate, the aim being to highlight the difficulty of economic coordination. Experiments by Battalio and Van Huyck include studies of the emergence of conventions, numerous coordination games, and peasant-dictator games, among others.

The collection also includes Battlaio and Van Huyck's communications with other prominent contributors to experimental economics such as Colin Camerer, Charles Holt, John Kagel, Thomas Palfrey, Ariel Rubinstein, Alvin Roth, Larry Samuelson, and Vernon Smith, among others.

Along with their own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Battalio and Van Huyck's roles in the Economic Science Association and Van Huyck's as an editor of Experimental Economics; and Battalio and Van Huyck's department roles, committee work, and teaching contributions in economics at Texas A & M.

Extensive digital materials from Battalio and Van Huyck's experiments are also included in the collection. Original naming conventions and file structures in the digital materials are preserved where possible.