Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Subject Missionaries -- Africa Remove constraint Subject: Missionaries -- Africa

Search Results

collection icon

The George Arthur Roberts Family Papers span the years from 1884 until the late 1970s (primarily the first half of the twentieth century), and consist largely of visual documents, including photographs, photograph albums, slides, and negatives; a collection of postcards and a small amount of printed material are also included. While the majority of the images are unidentified, they provide a rich and extensive pictorial record of the activities of pioneer Methodist missionaries, the early missions they established, and the personal experience and growth of one missionary family in this setting. George Arthur Roberts' memoir Let Me Tell You a Story..., copies of which are included in the collection, describes life as lived by these early missionaries and contrasts them with conditions in 1964, the time of its writing. In addition to documenting aspects of missionary history, the Roberts papers also depict the landscapes and peoples of Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and surrounding areas, particularly the Umtali region (now Mutare), at a time when they remained relatively untouched by western influence. The Papers are organized into the following series based on format: the Photographic Prints Series, Postcards Series, Printed Material Series, Negatives Series, Slides Series, and the Photograph Albums Series.

The Photographic Prints Series and the Slides Series comprise the bulk of the collection. Both series have been organized into the following subseries: People, Mission Activities, and African Scenes/Landscapes. The People Subseries contains numerous portraits of African men, women, and children; missionaries; and primarily the Roberts family themselves, including photos likely taken on various trips both within Africa and to other locations including the United States, Europe, and Asia. Of particular note in the People Subseries are a group of prints of the visit of the British Queen Mother and Elizabeth II to Melsetter Junction in 1948. The Mission Activities Subseries contains images of such school- and church-related events as conferences and gatherings, construction of mission buildings, agriculture, and animal husbandry. Some of the original prints used to illustrate Roberts' Let Me Tell You A Story... can also be found. There is little overlap, in terms of identical images, between the prints and slides series.

The Negatives Series contains 27 rolls of 35mm film, likely dating from the 1950s, from which contact sheets have been made. While the contact sheets are open for research, the master negative rolls themselves are closed to patron use. The series also includes some cut 35mm negative frames and a few medium-format negatives which are open for research. The subject matter of the negatives is similar to that of the Photographic Prints Series and the Slides Series. The majority of the images in this series do not appear to duplicate images found in previous series.

The Photograph Album Series consists of three bound photograph albums, containing a rich variety of images. The collection also includes an extensive Postcards Series, 1918-1965 and undated, from locations largely within Africa but also in Europe, Asia, and North America. The Printed Materials Series contains two copies of Let Me Tell You A Story..., George Arthur Roberts' memoir, and other mission-related material.

collection icon
Missionary of the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions at Corisco (Island), Western Africa, now part of Equitorial Guinea. Mackey was married to Elizabeth Blair in 1849. They arrived in Gabon in 1850. Elizabeth died in Gabon that year, prior to their establishing the Corisco mission. Mackey later married missionary Isabella (possibly Sweeney). Mackey died in New London, Pa., on 30 April 1867, at the age of 48, of consumption. Isabella died in New London, Pa., on 25 April 1872, at the age of 62. Collection comprises a letter (8 pgs.) Mackey sent to Mrs. Betsy Davis, detailing conditions of missionary life in West Africa. He describes housing, diet, living conditions, missionary activities (including Isabella Mackey's work), and attitudes toward local inhabitants.

Collection comprises a letter (8 pgs.) Mackey sent to Mrs. Betsy Davis, detailing conditions of missionary life in West Africa. He describes housing, diet, living conditions, missionary activities (including Isabella Mackey's work), and attitudes toward local inhabitants.

collection icon

Park-Lambuth-Sherertz family papers, 1825-1989 2.5 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

The Park, Lambuth, and Sherertz families were Methodist missionaries to China, Japan, and Africa. The collection includes the family Bible; correspondence to and from members of the three families; reports; diary entries; genealogical information; a videocassette; photographs; printed material; poetry; and typescripts of essays regarding family members' daily lives and work as missionaries in China, Japan, and Africa. The families mentioned are ancestors of Olive Sherertz Lanham (Duke '43). Materials range in date from circa 1825 to 1989.

The collection (01-108) (160 items, 1.2 linear feet; dated 1825-1970s) includes the family Bible; correspondence to and from members of the three families; graphic materials; printed material; poetry; and typescripts of essays regarding family members' daily lives and work as missionaries in China, Japan, and Africa. The families mentioned are ancestors of Olive Sherertz Lanham (Duke '43). Includes 2 color prints, 5 black-and-white prints, and 2 albumen prints.

The addition (01-146) (375 items, .6 linear feet; dated 1898-1977) contains letters; reports; diary entries; genealogical information; 1 videocassette; 2 black-and-white photographs, 1 black-and-white print, and 1 albumen print. There are also other items, chiefly relating to the Park, Lambuth, and Sherertz families' life and work in China and Japan.

The 2002 addition (02-179) (100 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 1825-1981 and n.d.) consists primarily of memoirs and correspondence documenting the families' ancestry and experiences in China and Japan (1825-1981 and n.d.). Also includes newspaper clippings about family members.

The 2004 addition (07-080) (375 items, 0.6 lin. ft; dated circa 1890-1989 and undated) contains letters, biographical sketches of family members, clippings, writings, and photographs documenting the members of the Park, Lambuth, and Sherertz families. Materials range in date from circa 1890 to 1989.

collection icon

Shields Family papers, 1888-1968 and undated 2.7 Linear Feet — circa 1000 Items

Reverend Robert Shields, his wife Louise Shields, and members of their family were Methodist missionaries in Angola between the 1890s and the 1960s. The Shields Family Papers consist of correspondence, legal papers, and photographs created by three generations of a missionary family. The correspondence documents the experiences of a missionary family in Angola (Luanda and Malange) and Zimbabwe (including the Umtali region) in the early twentieth century, and includes letters written from family members in England, among them letters written from Greta Gazeley to her mother, Wilhelmina Shields Gazeley, in the 1950s. The photographs, dating from the early 1900s to the 1960s, portray the lives of missionaries in Africa through portraits and snapshots of the Shields family and other groups both European, American and African, as well as photographs of groups of schoolchildren, mission buildings, and various scenes of African life and landscapes. The collection includes a handwritten memoir by Robert Shields, a biographical account of Louise Raven Shield's life compiled by her daughter, Irene Withey Shields, and various writings by Irene Withey Shields and Wilhelmina Taylor Shields on their experiences in Africa. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The Shields Family Papers consist of correspondence, legal papers, and photographs created by three generations of a missionary family. The correspondence documents the experiences of a missionary family in Angola (Luanda and Malange) and Zimbabwe (including the Umtali region) in the early twentieth century. In 1903, Louise Shields brought her children to live in London and gave birth to Helen there; much of the correspondence is between Louise and Robert during this period of separation. Leaving her children in England to return to Angola, Louise received additional correspondence from the woman who took care of the children in her absence. Also included in the correspondence is a series of letters written by Greta Gazeley to her mother Wilhelmina Taylor Shields Gazeley in the 1950s. The legal papers in the collection consist of marriage certificates, copies of birth certificates, an immigration visa for Robert Shields, and US Army discharge papers for Robert Dodson Shields. In addition, the collection includes a handwritten memoir by Robert Shields, a biographical account of Louise Raven Shield's life compiled by her daughter, Irene Withey Shields, and various writings by Irene Withey Shields and Wilhelmina Taylor Shields on their experiences in Africa. Also included are Irene's and Wilhelmina's diplomas from the University of Cape Town.

The extensive collection of photographs, dating from the early 1900s to the 1960s, provide a portrait of the lives of missionaries in Africa. The majority are portraits and snapshots of the Shields family and other groups both European, American, and African, as well as photographs of groups of schoolchildren, mission buildings, and various scenes of African life and landscapes. Several of the family portraits were taken during the family's time in England. The collection contains one photograph of Bishop William Taylor and a young African boy. Also included are a number of picture postcards. With the exception of three photograph albums, the photographs are unsorted and the majority are undated.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.