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J. Doane Stott papers, 1748-1999, bulk 1915-1989 4.5 Linear Feet — 1500 items

J. Doane Stott was a Methodist minister (N.C. conference) and missionary to Japan. A.B., Trinity College and B.D., Duke University. Chiefly sermons, clippings, and printed material of J. Doane Stott relating to his missionary work in Japan and ministry in North Carolina, as well as his lecture notes reflecting his time spent at Trinity College and Duke University. Papers also include items relating to Mr. Stott's involvement with CROP (Christian Rural Overseas Program), the Greensboro Urban Ministry, as well as the Lion's Club.

Chiefly sermons, clippings, and printed material of J. Doane Stott relating to his missionary work in Japan and ministry in North Carolina, as well as his lecture notes reflecting his time spent at Trinity College and Duke University. Papers also include items relating to Mr. Stott's involvement with CROP (Christian Rural Overseas Program), the Greensboro Urban Ministry, as well as the Lion's Club.

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Mary McMillan papers, 1936-1997 and undated, bulk 1952-1991, bulk 1952-1991 8.1 Linear Feet — 13 manuscript boxes; 2 oversize boxes; 2 oversize folders — 2277 Items

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The Mary McMillan Papers, 1936-1997 and undated (bulk 1952-1991), consist chiefly of journals and printed material, but also include correspondence, writings and speeches, photographic material, scrapbooks, clippings, videocassettes, audio cassettes, and memorabilia. Arranged in nine series based primarily on the format of the material, the papers illuminate the personal life and professional work of McMillan, a United Methodist missionary and teacher at the Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College in Hiroshima, Japan. In addition to her work as a teacher, the collection documents McMillan's service to the Kyodan, a unifying organization for Christian missionaries in Japan, and to the hibakusha, the survivors of the atomic bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as well as her peace activism. Also included are materials related to the Topaz Relocation Center, a Japanese-American internment camp in Utah where McMillan worked in 1943. The papers are mostly in English, but include some Japanese language materials.

The bulk of the collection consists of the Journals Series, whose 43 journals contain almost daily accounts of McMillan's work at Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College, her involvement with the Ushita Christian Church, and her encounters with friends and other people. Also included are her personal thoughts about world events, particularly those related to peace and nuclear disarmament. Beginning on Aug. 11, 1939 with the final preparations for her initial departure, McMillan records her activities through her first year and a half in Japan. The 1939 and 1940 journals document in depth McMillan's adaptation to life in Japan, including her training in the Japanese language and customs, her first visits to various cities throughout the country, and the difficulties she faced as an American woman in pre-World War II Japan. After she and other American workers in Hiroshima were forcibly evacuated on Feb. 29, 1941, journal entries are scarce; however, the almost-daily entries resume in 1952 and continue until the day of McMillan's death on July 19, 1991.

In addition to the journals, McMillan's professional work as a United Methodist missionary and teacher at Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College is well documented through the Correspondence Series, Writings and Speeches Series, and Printed Material Series. The Biographical Material Series includes McMillan's handwritten autobiographical notes, as well as newspaper and magazine clippings and booklets documenting McMillan's work at Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College, and with the Ushita Christian Church, which McMillan helped found in 1948. McMillan's correspondence also sheds light on her work through "mission letters," mass mailings which she wrote periodically as a way of updating her supporters in the United States on her work in Hiroshima.

McMillan also was a staunch advocate of world peace and nuclear disarmament, and after her retirement from the United Methodist Church in 1980, she spent much of her time writing letters and speaking in churches throughout the United States promoting her cause. McMillan's role as a pacifist is well well documented throughout the entire collection by her correspondence, photographs of demonstrations and marches, printed materials, and items in the Clippings Series. Much of the material in the Writings and Speeches Series and the Printed Material Series is related to peace activism, and covers topics such as the lingering effects of the atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima and that city's fight for peace, the first-hand accounts of bomb survivors, and the United Methodist Church's pacifist stance.

Also contributing to an understanding of McMillan's life, the Photographic Material Series and the Memorabilia Series offer visual and three-dimensional documentation of her activities as a missionary, teacher, and friend to the Japanese.

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Park-Lambuth-Sherertz family papers, 1825-1989 2.5 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

The Park, Lambuth, and Sherertz families were Methodist missionaries to China, Japan, and Africa. The collection includes the family Bible; correspondence to and from members of the three families; reports; diary entries; genealogical information; a videocassette; photographs; printed material; poetry; and typescripts of essays regarding family members' daily lives and work as missionaries in China, Japan, and Africa. The families mentioned are ancestors of Olive Sherertz Lanham (Duke '43). Materials range in date from circa 1825 to 1989.

The collection (01-108) (160 items, 1.2 linear feet; dated 1825-1970s) includes the family Bible; correspondence to and from members of the three families; graphic materials; printed material; poetry; and typescripts of essays regarding family members' daily lives and work as missionaries in China, Japan, and Africa. The families mentioned are ancestors of Olive Sherertz Lanham (Duke '43). Includes 2 color prints, 5 black-and-white prints, and 2 albumen prints.

The addition (01-146) (375 items, .6 linear feet; dated 1898-1977) contains letters; reports; diary entries; genealogical information; 1 videocassette; 2 black-and-white photographs, 1 black-and-white print, and 1 albumen print. There are also other items, chiefly relating to the Park, Lambuth, and Sherertz families' life and work in China and Japan.

The 2002 addition (02-179) (100 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 1825-1981 and n.d.) consists primarily of memoirs and correspondence documenting the families' ancestry and experiences in China and Japan (1825-1981 and n.d.). Also includes newspaper clippings about family members.

The 2004 addition (07-080) (375 items, 0.6 lin. ft; dated circa 1890-1989 and undated) contains letters, biographical sketches of family members, clippings, writings, and photographs documenting the members of the Park, Lambuth, and Sherertz families. Materials range in date from circa 1890 to 1989.