Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Subject Missions -- China Remove constraint Subject: Missions -- China

Search Results

collection icon

George Warren and Kate Rumsey Hinman missionary photograph albums, 1892-1900 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 2 photograph albums — 7 1/4 x 11 3/4 inches — 2 photograph albums

Two late 19th-century photo albums with small and large images primarily documenting George Warren and Kate Rumsey Hinman's travels and missionary work in central China. Most of the photographs were taken in Fuzhou (Foochow) and Shaowu, Fujian Province, where the Hinmans were assigned. The images are accompanied by detailed captions, and feature missionaries, mission and church buildings, Chinese preachers, local officials, children, river scenes, landscapes, and landmarks. There are also a few images of the Burrell School in Selma, Alabama, and two ministers in Michigan. The photographs are typically mounted one to a page, and are chiefly a mix of gelatin and collodion prints, with a few albumen prints included.

Two late 19th-century photograph albums primarily documenting George Warren and Kate Rumsey Hinman's travels and missionary work in central China. Most of the photographs were taken in Fuzhou (Foochow) and Shaowu, Fujian Province, where the Hinmans were assigned.

The earliest images, in Album 1, are of the Rev. George Stillwell of Garden, Michigan and the Rev. E. G. Palmer and family of Oxford, Michigan. A series of images of buildings, staff and students of the Burrell School in Selma, Alabama are also found in Album 1, as well as a few larger images from China. The black-and-white photographs in this album appear to be a mix of albumen and collodion or gelatin prints.

Album 2 contains 57 black-and-white photographs taken in China, Fujian Province, chiefly in Fuzhou (Foochow) and Shaowu, where the Hinmans were assigned. There are portraits of local officials, river scenes, and other landscapes. Other locations seem to be mostly in Fujian Province, and include the Ing Hok River, Ing Tai; Yeng Bing (?), a location near Fuzhou; Guling (Kuliang), a mountain location near Fuzhou, where the Hinmans stayed in a cottage; and landmarks such as monasteries, city gates, and the Bridge of 10,000 Ages in Fuzhou (also found in the Sidney Gamble photographs collection at Duke). The photographs in this album appear to be primarily collodion and gelatin prints.

collection icon
Ezra Caryl Brownell, of Ridgefield Park, New Jersey was a banker with the Bank of New York. In 1918 he was made manager of the Tientsin, China branch of the Asia Banking Corporation and was charged with oversight of the bank's opening. He travelled to China in April 1918 with his wife Grace Donald Brownell of Butler, New Jersey. The couple lived in Shanghai and Tientsin, returning to the United States in March 1921. Chiefly letters of Grace Donald Brownell to family members and family friends in New Jersey. Letters of Ezra Carly Brownell are scattered throughout the collection. The letters touch on myriad topics including familial events and happenings in New Jersey; observations of Chinese and Japanese customs and culture; current affairs in China, the United States, and the world; as well as the couples' travels, routines, and other activities in China.

The collection consits primarily of letters written by Grace Donald Brownell to friends and family in New Jersey. However, also present are scattered letters of Ezra Carly Brownell.

Letters of 1918 primarily describe the couple's journey from New Jersey to San Francisco and the voyage to China on the S.S. Nanking. Present are descriptions of the cities of Salt Lake City and Provo, Utah, including a visit to the Great Salt Lake and San Francisco, California. Letters also describe the voyage from San Francisco to Shanghai including missionaries, Y.M.C.A workers, schoolteachers, and Red Cross workers aboard the S.S. Nanking; stops in Honalulu, Hawaii and Yokohama, Japan. Letters also offer observations of Japanese and Chinese cultures, the laboring poor in China, the effects of embargo on the native population, and differences in local dress based on class and gender.

Letters of 1919 offer descriptions of life in Beijing and Tientsen, China. Letters prior to the couples' relocation to Tientsen describe visits to a local convent, orphanage, tea house, market, and temple; preparations for and celebrations of the Chinese New Year; modes of Chinese worship and perceived "superstitions"; and activities with the local Woman's Club. Letters from Tientsen include detailed descriptions of the couples' home and furnishings, Bastille Day celebrations in the local French settlement, the activities and services of various religious denominations including the Church of England, Union Church, Catholic Church and Christian Science, meetings with numerous diplomats and dignitaries including the American, British, and Prussian Consuls and the Chinese Commissioner of Foreign Affairs, as well as Grace's teaching position at a Methodist Mission School.

Letters of 1920 and 1921 continue to focus on the couples' daily life in Tientsen including various club activities, trips into the country side, the cost of goods, services, and various commodities, and descriptions of a visit to a Womens Temple. Many of the letters, however, discuss social and political developments in China including student demonstrations and unrest, the boycott of Japanese goods, and the beginning of factionalism within the military mentioning General Wu Peifu of the Zhili clique and accusations of other factions collaborating with the Japanese. Letters also describe the influx of refugees into Tientsen from the provinces due to famine and factional fighting and various foreign relief efforts.

collection icon

The Inabelle Graves Coleman Papers, 1942-1981 (bulk 1952-1957), contain letters and more than 300 photographs documenting her life as a female Baptist missionary in Shanghai, China, and Taipei, Taiwan. Coleman was a school administrator, teacher, and author who lived much of her life abroad in service for the Southern Baptist Convention. Written almost entirely to family members, the letters date from 1946 to 1957, and contain information about her daily life and work; most were sent from Taipei, although some from Shanghai are also included.

The letters reveal tremendous enthusiasm for her work, the people around her, and those she brought into the church's ministry. This zeal for fostering the Christian life in others often overshadowed news of her regular teaching dutes, as she perhaps found no separation of the two. She wrote often of her students, and her concern for her family back in the U.S. Admiration for the people of Shanghai and Taipei are also evident. Letters frequently touch on her health while abroad, her physical surroundings, a tight schedule of teaching and ministering, and Grace Baptist Church, which she founded.

Photographs complement many of the letters, especially those about Grace Baptist Church and its programs. Subjects are mainly people and scenes in Taipei, although a large number are unidentified. Small series of photos include those of her assistants, Lillian Lu and Daisy, students, portraits of her family, as well as many of Grace Baptist Church. Included also are photographs of various church and school groups.

There are two autograph books from Chinese friends; manuscript writings include four articles written for the church, including one about the University of Shanghai's president. Also in the collection is a file of miscellaneous materials including a report of the Yates Baptist Association, biographical information, several business cards, a pamphlet in Chinese, an invitation, and clippings.

collection icon

Martha Foster Crawford diaries, 1846-1881 1 Linear Foot — 7 volumes

online icon
Collection contains diaries of Martha (Foster) Crawford as a young woman in Alabama, 1845-1851, and later as a Baptist missionary to China. Topics include conditions in Shanghai from 1852 to 1864 and afterwards at Tengchow, Shantung, and her reactions to the Civil War in the United States. Her diary shows the impact of the American Protestant missionary on China with a day-by-day record of her life. The Shanghai period covers the Taiping rebellion and discusses the hope that the rebellion might furnish a means for converting the Empire to Christianity. Included also are several printed pamphlets and an original manuscript history of missions in China.

Collection contains diaries of Martha (Foster) Crawford as a young woman in Alabama, 1845-1851, and later as a Baptist missionary to China. Topics include conditions in Shanghai from 1852 to 1864 and afterwards at Tengchow, Shantung, and her reactions to the Civil War in the United States. Her diary shows the impact of the American Protestant missionary on China with a day-by-day record of her life. The Shanghai period covers the Taiping rebellion and discusses the hope that the rebellion might furnish a means for converting the Empire to Christianity. Included also are several printed pamphlets and an original manuscript history of missions in China.

collection icon

Stirewalt Family papers, 1830s-1993 6 Linear Feet — 2750 Items

The Stirewalt Family Papers, 1828-1993 (bulk 1850-1947), are comprised of the personal papers of individuals from four successive generations of the Stirewalt family. The correspondence, writings, diaries, legal/financial documents, photographs, and other miscellaneous papers found in this collection document the Stirewalt Family's personal lives and involvement in the Lutheran Church as ministers, educators and missionaries. The collection is divided into four primary series which reflect the individuals whose papers make up this collection: Jacob Stirewalt, Jerome Paul Stirewalt, Martin Luther Stirewalt, and Catherine A. Stirewalt. The arrangement of the collection is primarily chronological, following the lineage of the Stirewalt family. Subsections within each major series are determined by the type of materials found within the collection and are arranged either chronologically, as in the case of the Diaries and Correspondence Subseries, or alphabetically and thereunder chronologically, as in the case of the Writings Subseries.

The Stirewalt family is descended from Jacob Stirewalt, a minister and member of the Tennessee Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. Jacob Stirewalt was primarily active in and around New Market, Va. and Rowan and Shenandoah counties in Virginia. The Subseries related to Jacob Stirewalt includes Correspondence from 1828-1858, Writings (primarily sermons and sermon outlines in German and English) from the 1830s to the 1860s, and Diaries, which includes a Memorandum book where he recorded financial transactions and other records of his career as a minister from 1834 to his death in 1869.

Jerome Paul Stirewalt, the son of Jacob Stirewalt, was also a minister and a leader of the Tennessee Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. He served as a minister in several pastorates in Virginia and North Carolina and several terms as president, secretary, and treasurer of the Tennessee Synod in the late 1800s and early 1900s. His papers are primarily composed of Correspondence, 1870-1933, with other ministers, relating to the business of the Tennessee Synod, and with family members. The collection also includes Jerome Paul Stirewalt's Writings, primarily sermons and sermon outlines, and other miscellaneous financial and legal papers. The Diaries Subseries is primarily memorandum books which list the date and location of religious services performed and the topic or title of sermons delivered by J.P. Stirewalt. These books serve to provide a record of Stirewalt's work as a Lutheran minister.

Martin Luther Stirewalt, the son of Jerome Paul Stirewalt, was also a Lutheran minister and educator at Lutheran schools and colleges in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Chicago, Ill. This series includes correspondence, diaries, writings and clippings which provide a picture of Stirewalt's theological education, activities as a minister and educator, and insights into his personal life and familial relationships.

The papers of Catherine A Stirewalt, Martin Luther Stirewalt's daughter, are primarily correspondence written while she was a Lutheran Missionary in China from 1939-1949. This correspondence provides documentation of the Lutheran Church's activities in China prior to and after World War II. Catherine Stirewalt's letters provide a great deal of detail about the daily lives of missionaries in China and some information about the lives of the Chinese people working as instructors or attending the mission school. There is no correspondence from the period of the first two years of World War II when she was interned in the Weihsien concentration camp near Tsingtao, China. Other miscellaneous clippings, photographs, and writings in this series provide further documentation of her experiences in China.