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Collection
American Assembly is a national, non-partisan public affairs forum illuminating issues of public policy by commissioning research and publications, sponsoring meetings, and issuing reports, books, and other literature. It was founded by Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1950. The American Assembly sponsored southeastern regional meetings at Duke University from 1957 to 1961. Records include correspondence, printed matter, press releases, programs, agendas, reports, and other materials concerning the assemblies held at Duke University. Correspondents include Benjamin Ratchford, Lloyd Saville, and A. Hollis Edens. Major subjects include monetary policy and national goals. English.

American Assembly Records include correspondence, printed matter, press releases, programs, agendas, reports, and other materials concerning the assemblies held at Duke University. The bulk of the records date from 1959 to 1961, and relate to planning for the second and third southeastern regional assemblies held at Duke on monetary policy in 1959, and on national goals in 1961. Correspondents include Benjamin Ratchford, Lloyd Saville, and A. Hollis Edens.

Collection

Axel Leijonhufvud papers, 1953-1980 and undated 4.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 3,000 Items

Swedish economist, currently professor emeritus at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and professor at the University of Trento, Italy. The papers of economist Axel Leijonhufvud date from 1953-1980 and consist of correspondence, writing, research, and lecture notes pertaining to Leijonhufvud's career as a Keynesian economist and professor. Contents range from Leijonhufvud's work at the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student to the early years of his professorship at the University of California at Los Angeles, including a sizeable amount of written work from his time at Northwestern University as a Ph.D. candidate and lecture notes from his time at the University of Lund in Sweden. Topics in economic thought include macroeconomic theory, especially as it pertains to finance; instability and disequilibrium economics; monetary theory and policies; inflation; banking; market systems; Keynesian thought; and the history of economics in general. A few items are in Swedish.

The papers of economist Axel Leijonhufvud consist of correspondence, writing, research, and lecture notes pertaining to Leijonhufvud's career as a Keynesian economist and professor. Contents range from Leijonhufvud's work at the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student to the early years of his professorship at the University of California at Los Angeles, including a sizeable amount of written work from his time at Northwestern University as a Ph.D. candidate and lecture notes from his time at the University of Lund in Sweden. Topics in economic thought include macroeconomic theory; instability and (dis)equilibrium economics; monetary theory and policies; inflation; banking; market systems; Keynesian thought; and the history of economics in general.

The Correspondence Series includes communications from notable individuals such as Armen Alchian, Robert W. Clower (co-author), Robert Dorfman, Alan G. Gowman, Bert Hoselitz, Erik Lundberg, Gunnar Myrdal, and Joan Robinson. A few items are in Swedish. The Writings and Research Series includes Leijonhufvud's master's thesis and notes, doctoral dissertation and related research, and a variety of graduate papers in addition to drafts and published pieces; there are six subseries - Axel Leijonhufvud Writings, Class Lecture Notes, Dissertation, Graduate Work, Research and Notes, and Writings by Others. Within the latter there is a sizeable amount of unpublished and later-published manuscripts by Joan Robinson, fellow economist and close colleague.

Collection

Benjamin U. Ratchford papers, 1924 - 1980 4.5 Linear Feet — 3,000 Items

Online
Benjamin U. Ratchford (1902-1977) served as professor of economics at Duke University from 1928-1960. An expert in public finance, Ratchford was involved a number of economic policy projects, including the reconstruction of Germany after World War II. The papers consist of correspondence, subject files, teaching materials, documents, clippings, writings, notes, reports, a journal, and a scrapbook. Major subjects include Duke Univ. administration and Economics Dept., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Office of Price Administration, the economy of Germany after World War II, the U.S. War Department, and monetary regulation. English.

The Benjamin U. Ratchford Papers contain correspondence, subject files, teaching materials, documents, writings, notes, reports, a journal, and a scrapbook. Major subjects present within the collection include the Duke University administration and Economics Dept., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Office of Price Administration, the economy of Germany after World War II, the United States War Department, and monetary regulation.

The papers are organized into two series, Correspondence and Subject Files. The Correspondence series contains correspondence with a number of individuals and organizations relating to Ratchford's work as a professor, researcher, economic advisor, and editor. The correspondence also outlines his role as vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. The Subject Files series covers various topics, including the Federal Reserve Bank, the Duke University Economics Department, teaching materials, the resignation of President A. Hollis Edens, the Office of Price Administration, economics organizations, and economics subjects. Also present in this series are several travel logs, including a scrapbook documenting a 1936 road trip across the country and a journal kept during Ratchford's 1945-1946 trip to Berlin working as an Economic Advisor for Level of Industry to the Office of Military Government for Germany.

Collection

Martin Bronfenbrenner papers, 1939-1995 and undated 16.2 Linear Feet — Approximately 12,000 Items

Economist on the faculty at Duke University. The professional papers of Martin Bronfenbrenner span the years 1939 to 1995 and consist of correspondence, research files, memoranda, writings (published and unpublished), teaching materials, reprints, clippings, and other papers, relating chiefly to Bronfenbrenner's research and associations in the field of economics. Topics in his research files, which make up the bulk of the collection, include income distribution theory, economic development, Marxian and radical economics (including New Left economics), labor economics, monetary economics, international economics, trade, Japanese economy and Japanese history. The collection is organized into the following series: Personal Files, Printed Material, Research and Writing Files, and Teaching Material.

The professional papers of Martin Bronfenbrenner span the years 1939 to 1995 and consist of correspondence, research files, memoranda, writings (published and unpublished), teaching materials, reprints, clippings, and other papers, relating chiefly to Bronfenbrenner's research and associations in the field of economics. The collection is organized into the following series: Personal Files, Published Material, Research and Writing Files, and Teaching Material. The Personal Papers Series includes an unpublished autobiography, a family history, and records of Bronfenbrenner's own U.S. loyalty hearings from 1954-1955. Files in the Teaching Material Series chiefly contain syllabi, course notes, and exams dating from Bronfenbrenner's time at Carnegie, Duke, and in Japan, while the Printed Material files mainly house reprints of many of his articles. The Research Files Series, divided into topical subseries, makes up the bulk of the collection, including Bronfenbrenner's research notes, articles, reprints, correspondence, lectures, and drafts of Bronfenbrenner's writings; the materials offer a rich source of unique research material on topics of interest to Bronfenbrenner such as income distribution theory, economic development, Marxian and radical economics (including New Left economics), labor economics, monetary economics, international economics, trade, Japanese economy and Japanese history. The Research Files also contains a subseries of research folders linked to individual economists in whose work Bronfenbrenner had an interest, or with whom he corresponded, or both; names include Adelman, Baumol, Friedman, Leijonhufvud, Minsky, Samuelson, Spengler, Solow, and Viner, with two folders of material on Kei Shibata, who wrote on Marxian economics and economic equilibrium during the 1930s.

Collection

Paul Davidson papers, 1961-2004 and undated 13.5 Linear Feet — Apprpoximately 10,125 Items

Economist on the faculty at the University of Tennessee and editor of the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics. The Paul Davidson Papers span the years 1961-2004 and document his professional career and interests, including post-Keynesian economics; international monetary payments and global employment policies; monetary theory; income distribution; and energy economics. The collection almost exclusively consists of correspondence files, with the exception of a few clippings and speeches folders. The most notable group of correspondents are his fellow post-Keynesians such as Victoria Chick, Alfred Eichner, John Kenneth Galbraith, Geoff Harcourt, Jan Kregel, Hyman Minsky, Basil Moore, Luigi Pasinetti, Joan Robinson, Anthony Thirlwall, and Sidney Weintraub. Other correspondents of note include Philip Arestis, Peter Bernstein, Robert Clower, Robert Eisner, Sir John Hicks, Allan H. Meltzer, Edward Nell, Don Patinkin, James Tobin, and Paul Samuelson. Other large amounts of correspondence and other materials relate to Davidson's editorial work with many major economics journals, including the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, which he founded; these folders typically contain correspondence between Davidson, journal referees, and authors.

The Paul Davidson Papers span the years 1961-2004 and document his professional career and interests, including post-Keynesian economics; international monetary payments and global employment policies; monetary theory; income distribution; and energy economics. The collection almost exclusively consists of correspondence files, with the exception of a few clippings and speeches folders. The most notable group of correspondents are his fellow post-Keynesians such as Victoria Chick, Alfred Eichner, John Kenneth Galbraith, Geoff Harcourt, Jan Kregel, Hyman Minsky, Basil Moore, Luigi Pasinetti, Joan Robinson, Anthony Thirlwall, and Sidney Weintraub. Other correspondents of note include Philip Arestis, Peter Bernstein, Robert Clower, Robert Eisner, Sir John Hicks, Allan H. Meltzer, Edward Nell, Don Patinkin, James Tobin, and Paul Samuelson. Other large amounts of correspondence and other materials relate to Davidson's editorial work with many major economics journals, including the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, which he founded; these folders typically contain correspondence between Davidson, journal referees, and authors. In one group of folders, Davidson engages with other colleagues in sometimes heated exchanges about bias in professional journals. In addition to correspondence with colleagues and authors, the files also contain correspondence related to academic departments where Davidson held positions. Reflecting his broad background, the papers also document Davidson's involvement with politics (see the Congress folder) and consultancy work for an energy company in his early career (the Oil and Energy folders), and his role as an active public figure, documented by letters to the editor for various maistream publications.

Collection

Robert E. Lucas papers, 1960-2011 and undated 27 Linear Feet — 0.12 Gigabytes — Approximately 13,875 Items

Robert E. Lucas is an Economist at the University of Chicago and Nobel Prize laureate. The Robert E. Lucas Papers span the years 1960-2004, and document the professional work and career of Lucas during his appointments at the Graduate School of Industrial Administration at Canegie-Mellon University, and at the Department of Economics at the University of Chicago. The collection is arranged into the following series: Correspondence; Professional Service; Research Files; and Teaching Material, with the most substantial material in the research series. Folders assembled and maintained by Lucas over many years contain notes, correspondence, drafts, clippings, reports, course and departmental files, and other material related to topics such as business cycles, monetary theory, rational expectations, economic growth, supply-side economics, and unemployment.

The Robert E. Lucas Papers span the years 1960-2004, and represent the professional work and career of Lucas during his appointments at the Graduate School of Industrial Administration at Canegie-Mellon University, and at the Department of Economics at the University of Chicago. The collection is arranged into the following series: Correspondence; Professional Service; Research Files; and Teaching Material. Lucas is best known for for having developed and applied the hypothesis of rational expectations, and thereby having transformed macroeconomic analysis and deepened the understanding of economic policy. His work in these and other areas is profiled in the Research Files Series, the most substantial of the collection. Folders assembled and maintained by Lucas over many years contain notes, correspondence, drafts, clippings, reports, and other material related to topics such as business cycles, monetary theory, rational expectations, economic growth, supply side economics, and unemployment. No less significant is the Correspondence Series, nine boxes of exchanges with such economists and colleagues such as Lucas' collaborators Edward C. Prescott and Thomas Sargent, as well as James Tobin, Neil Wallace, Karl Brunner, David Cass, Edmund S. Phelps, Robert J. Gordon, Robert J. Barro, Leonard A. Rapping and John B. Taylor. These letters amplify the documentation in the research files on Lucas' career and research, as well as topics and debates in economics in the 20th century.

In addition to documenting Lucas' work in theoretical economics, the collection also follows his professional activities through documents found in the Professional Service Series. Items relate to his participation on various committees, his editorial and presidential commitments, and his work with institutions such as the American Economic Association (AEA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).

Finally, the Teaching Material Series, offers administrative files and course materials, such as notes, transparencies and exam subjects, dating from the 1960s to the 1990s and relating to Lucas' academic departmental service and teaching career.

Detailed descriptions on the arrangement and content of each series can be found in the respective sections of this collection guide.

Collection

William J. Baumol Papers, 1928-2013 130 Linear Feet — 5.74 Gigabytes

Online
William J. Baumol (1922-2017) was an economist and worked as a professor of economics at Princeton University and New York University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, his collaborations and professional affiliations, and his work as a painter and sculptor.

The William Baumol papers document his career as an economist and artist. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, including his research on the cost disease, unbalanced growth, productivity growth, entrepreneurship, increasing returns and international trade, anti-trust policy, contestable markets, market structure, macroeconomic theory, and interest rate and monetary theory, among other topics. Baumol's research and writings on the economics of the arts, undertaken and co-authored with his wife Hilda, are included in the collection.

The collection also documents his collaboration and communication with prominent economists such as Maurice Allais, Gary Becker, Alan Blinder, George Dantzig, Robert Dorfman, Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Ralph Gomory, Frank Hahn, Roy Harrod, John Hicks, Ursula Hicks, Samuel Hollander, Nicholas Kaldor, Harold Kuhn, Abba Lerner, Jacob Marschak, Don Patinkin, Lionel Robbins, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, Ralph Turvey, Jacob Viner, and Edward Wolff, among others. Of note is Baumol's longtime collaboration with, and extensive support received from, Sue Anne Batey Blackman.

Along with his scholarship and writings, the collection documents Baumol's leadership roles at the Berkley Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation and the C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics at New York University, as well as his extensive expert witness and consulting activities for the Federal Communications Commission, Federal Trade Commission, the Interstate Commerce Commission, the Joint Economic Committee, and the Senate Judiciary Committee, among others. Baumol's consulting was often done through the companies Alderson and Sessions, Mathematica, and Consultants in Industry Economics. His notable expert witness testimonies revolved around regulation in telecommunications (particularly the ATT monopoly), airline ticket prices and sales practices, pricing of railroad freight shipping, and other topics.

Materials from Baumol's teaching at Princeton and New York University, departmental, and committee work are included in the collection. The collection also contains samples of Baumol's artwork, including sketches and paintings.

Collection

W. M. (Warner Max) Corden papers, 1957-2012 14.5 Linear Feet — 10 boxes

Warner Max Corden (W. M. Corden) is an Australian economist specializing in trade protection. Collection of his professional papers includes materials from his studies, work, and professorship in Australia, including many files of correpondence with fellow economists around the world; also includes drafts, publications, and reviews of his writings.

Collection consists of materials created and assembled by W. Max Corden, including writings, correspondence, and project files from his studies and career at Oxford, the International Monetary Fund, and the Australian National University. Items in this collection have been described and sorted by Corden; descriptions are replicated here. He has largely arranged the materials to correspond with his professional career; materials from his time working at Oxford, IMF, and SAIF have been separated from his materials produced in Australia. The collection also contains series based on format, including conferences and lectures, writings and publications, and many files of correspondence with economists around the world. Acquired as part of the Economists' Papers Archive at Duke University.