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Collection

Allan H. Bone papers, 1944 - 1989 12 Linear Feet — 12000 Items

Allan H. Bone (1917-1992) spent nearly forty years in the Duke University Department of Music. He served as professor of music, chair of the department, and conductor of the Duke Symphony Orchestra. The Allan H. Bone Papers include material related to conducting, music subjects, courses, research, and the administration and history of the Duke University Department of Music. It also includes concert programs from Duke University performances, personal correspondence, and daily planners. English.

The Allan H. Bone Papers include material related to conducting, music subjects, courses, research, and the administration and history of the Duke University Department of Music. It also includes concert programs from Duke University performances, personal correspondence, and daily planners.

Collection

Coleman family papers, 1895-1971 3 Linear Feet — Approx. 364 Items

Residents of Canada, Europe, and Asheville, N.C. Collection consists largely of a two-volume diary, 1895-1919, of Isabel Fleury Coleman, a twenty-three volume set of diaries, 1904-1971, belonging to Mary Augusta Coleman, and photographs of Fleury-Coleman family members and some of their residences. There are also two volumes pertaining to Mary Coleman's personal accounts and the "French Broad River Garden Club, 1967-1969," a few items of correspondence and genealogy, and a number of clippings and printed materials. Topics covered by the materials include music instruction (violin and piano), women's society life in Asheville, N.C., and women's travel in European countries during the 20th century.

Collection consists largely of a two-volume diary, 1895-1919, of Isabel Coleman, a twenty-three volume set of diaries, 1904-1971, belonging to Mary Augusta Coleman, and photographs of Fleury-Coleman family members and some of their residences. There are also two volumes pertaining to Mary Coleman's personal accounts, "French Broad River Garden Club, 1967-1969," a few items of correspondence and genealogy, and a number of clippings and printed materials. Topics covered by the materials include music clubs, instruction and performance (violin and piano) in Europe and the U.S., women's society life and fashions in Asheville, N.C., and women's travel in European countries during the 20th century. There are few comments about current events, even during the World Wars and the Depression, but there are extensive accounts of social life and customs in Europe and Asheville, N.C.

Collection

Frank Foster papers, 1930-2013 and undated, bulk 1950s-2009 60.5 Linear Feet — Approximately 2,050 items

Frank B. Foster III is a saxophonist, flautist, big band leader, educator, and Grammy Award-winning jazz composer and arranger, professionally active in music since the 1940s. The Frank Foster Papers consist chiefly of scores and parts composed or arranged by Foster for big bands and other large jazz ensembles from the 1950s through 2009. Also present are personal files consisting of correspondence, photographs, business records, publicity, reviews, and news clippings; and subject files on musical collaborations, music teaching, organizations and individuals, and family history.

The Frank Foster Papers span the dates 1930 to 2013, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1950s to 2009. The papers consist chiefly of scores and parts composed or arranged by Foster for big bands and other large jazz ensembles, including works written for the Count Basie Orchestra in the 1950s-1960s and again in the 1980s-1990s, as well as works for The Loud Minority, and numerous other bands and organizations for which Foster was commissioned to compose. The collection is arranged in the following series: Compositions by Frank Foster, Compositions by Others, Personal Files, and Audio and Moving Image Materials. The compositions series are organized into Letter-Sized, Legal-Sized and Oversized subseries. The personal files consist of autobiographical writings, correspondence, photographs, business records, publicity, reviews, and news clippings; and subject files on musical collaborations, music teaching, organizations and individuals, and family history. Audio and moving image materials are primarily concert recordings featuring Foster from the 1970s through the 1990s. Acquired as part of the Jazz Archive at Duke University.

Collection
John Hicks was a jazz pianist, composer, and educator professionally active in music since the 1960s. The John Hicks Papers consist of compositions composed, arranged, or performed by John Hicks; a variety of personal files documenting his history in music; and a large collection of audio and moving image materials containing concerts, rehearsals, interviews, and piano lessons with Hicks.

The John Hicks Papers span the dates of 1950 through 2015, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1980s and 1990s. The papers consist of compositions composed, arranged, or performed by John Hicks or Elise Wood; and personal files, including business records, press materials, photographs and correspondence. Also included is a large collection of audio and moving image materials, consisting chiefly of concert recordings of Hicks from the 1980s through the 2000s, but also containing rehearsals, interviews, and piano lessons with Hicks. There are audio and moving image materials in audio cassette, LP, CD, VHS, Betamax, and DVD formats.

Collection

Paul Jeffrey papers, 1969-2006 145 Linear Feet — Approximately 3500 Items

Paul H. Jeffrey was a saxophonist, composer, arranger, and educator. The Paul Jeffrey Papers have as their focal point nearly 1,400 manuscript scores and parts that Jeffrey composed or arranged for big band jazz ensemble, primarily for the Duke Jazz Ensemble. Also present are audio and moving image materials, photographs and posters, as well as correspondence, promotional materials, and written records relating to various aspects of Jeffrey's career.

The Paul Jeffrey Papers span the dates 1969 to 2006. The papers have as their focal point nearly 1,400 manuscript scores and parts that Jeffrey composed or arranged for big band jazz ensemble, primarily for the Duke Jazz Ensemble. The papers also include photographs, posters, and other written records of Jeffrey's musical career since the 1960s. There are additionally over 500 hours of concert and studio recordings in a number of audio and moving image formats that date since the 1960s. These formats include audiocassettes, open reel audio tapes, compact discs, digital audio tapes, long-playing records, VHS, and Hi-8 video cassettes. The collection is arranged into the following five series: Correspondence, Promotional Material, and Festival Records; Photographs and Posters; Audio and Moving Image Materials; Music Manuscripts; and Oversize Music Manuscripts. Audio and Moving Image Materials are arranged by format, and Music Manuscripts are arranged alphabetically. Acquired as a part of the Jazz Archive at Duke University.

Collection
William Klenz was an associate professor in Duke University's Department of Aesthetics, Art, and Music from 1947-1966. Collection contains sheet music and an unpublished manuscript by William Klenz entitled The Elements of Music Theory, 1960. A later addition from Klenz's mentee and collaborator, Geoffrey Simon, contains manuscripts for Pacem in Terris, a cantata for mixed voices and organ (dated 1965), as well as an original performing score for Toccata ("Carillon"), dedicated to Simon (dated 1959 and 1962).

The collection consists of manuscript music and sheet music composed by Klenz, as well as supporting materials for some of the performances and some background information and a personal characterization of Klenz. The unpublished manuscript of William Klenz entitled The Elements of Music Theory, 1960, was donated to the Archives by a former student of Klenz.

The 2021 accession contains two additional manuscripts: first, Pacem in Terris, cantata for mixed voices and organ. Texts for Pacem in Terris were selected by Klenz from biblical and rabbinical texts cited by Rabbi Everett Gendler in his The Revolutionary Truism (The Saturday Review, February 13, 1965). The first performance of Pacem in Terris was conducted by Geoffrey Simon at American University (Washington, DC) on November 21, 1965. The material consists of the original manuscript, including an additional Intermezzo not in first manuscript; also contains one performing copy from premiere; one copy (scored in Sibelius) from a later performance; and one copy of program from the premiere.

Also donated in 2021 was an original performing score (copy of manuscript) of Toccata ("Carillon"), for organ, V-19-1959. This score was dedicated to the donor (see final page with Klenz signature, date, and "for G.S."). Its first performance was in Berlin, Germany, at the Neutempelhof Kirche on August 18, 1962.