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"Hum Sab Ayodhya" exhibit panels on the Ayodhya region and destruction of the mosque, and related protest posters, Uttar Pradesh, India, after 1993-2000 3.5 Linear Feet — 3 oversize folders; 1 box — 84 items — Approximately 17 x 21 3/4 to 28 1/4 x 38 1/4 inches

Collection consists of 37 large paper sheets bearing reduced-size reproductions of 83 panels that formed a 1993 exhibit narrating the history, culture, and customs of the Aydhoya region in India, now part of the state of Uttar Pradesh. It was organized by the curator Ram Rahman and SAHMAT (Safdar Hashmi Memorial Trust), a New Delhi-based collective of Indian artists, writers, and activists against communalism and violent extremism. Also includes 47 posters protesting extremist violence, created by the same organization. The exhibit illustrates the origins of the Babri Masjid mosque complex and its destruction by Hindu extremists in December 1992. The black-and-white and color reproductions, most without captions, include 16th century paintings; regional maps; plans and large color photographs of the mosque complex; details of sculptures, scripts, and reliefs; reproductions of English accounts; and photographs of area inhabitants as well as individuals associated with regional politics. There are also several texts in Hindi. The sheets measure approximately 28 1/4 x 38 1/4 inches. Posters are sized approximately 17 x 21 3/4 inches. Detailed information on the original 1993 exhibit and its historical context is found in a 2012 publication on the exhibit, available in the Duke Libraries.

Collection consists of 37 oversize paper sheets bearing reduced-size reproductions of 83 wall panels relating to the exhibit "Hum Sab Ayodhya" ("We are all Ayodhya") on the history and culture of the Ayodhya region and mosque, Uttar Pradesh, India. Also includes 47 protest posters relating to right-wing extremism and violence.

The exhibit, organized by the curator Ram Rahman and Sahmat (Safdar Hashmi Memorial Trust, a Delhi-based collective of Indian artists and writers against communalism), explored the complex history, geography, and cultural life of Ayodhya, or Saket, presently located in the district of Faizabad, in the State of Uttar Pradesh, India. It focused specifically on the Babri Masjid mosque complex, built in the 16th century and an important religious site for India's Muslims, as well as a site for clashes between Hindu and Muslim communities.

The exhibit was mounted in New Delhi shortly after the destruction of the Babri Masjid by Hindu extremists in December 1992, and there was fierce controversy over its content.

The black-and-white and color exhibit sheets feature 16th century illustrations; large color and black-and-white photographs of the mosque complex; photographs of its inscriptions, reliefs, and sculptures; images of deities; maps of the region; photographs of individuals connected with regional politics and activism; and 20th century photographic portraits of local Ayodhya peoples.

Exhibit texts include reproductions of several 19th century English accounts regarding the region's politics and geography, explanatory texts in Hindi, and an introductory title panel, also in Hindi. The sheets measure approximately 28 1/4 x 38 1/4 inches. The original sequence of the individual panels is indicated by numbers marked on the backs of the sheets.

Detailed information on the exhibit and its historical context is found in a 2012 publication on the exhibit, available in the Duke Libraries.

The collection also includes a group of 47 posters created by the SAHMAT collective from the late 1990s, protesting right-wing extremist violence in India directed at secular, cultural, and religious groups. Many refer to specific acts of violence or political and cultural intimidation. Posters include text in Hindi and English, graphic design elements, photographs, eyewitness quotations, slogans, and artwork.