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E. Roy Weintraub papers, 1930-2019 and undated 15.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — 1.1 Gigabytes

E. Roy Weintraub (b.1943) is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Duke University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings.

The E. Roy Weintraub Papers document his career as a historian of economics and mathematics, and professor at Duke University. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the history of economics, role in the community of history of economics scholars, and as a faculty member and administrator at Duke.

The collection also documents his communications with prominent economists as research subjects such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, and Lionel McKenzie. Included in Weintraub's communications are exchanges with prominent figures in the history of economics and related communities of scholars such as Roger Backhouse, Bradley Bateman, Anthony Brewer, Arjo Klamer, Mary Morgan, Deirdre McCloskey, and Philip Mirowski.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Weintraub's roles at in the History of Economics Society, at Duke University, and as an editor of History of Political Economy.

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Paul A. Samuelson papers, 1933-2010 and undated 119 Linear Feet — Approx. 88,950 Items

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Paul A. Samuelson was a Nobel Prize-winning economist and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Paul Samuelson papers span the years 1933 to 2010 and cover nearly all aspects of his long career. The collection is arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Awards, Committees and Projects, Correspondence, Printed Materials, Speeches and Interviews, Teaching Materials, and Unpublished Writings. Significant correspondents include Milton Friedman, Don Patinkin, and Robert Solow, and many other notable economists, Nobel prize winners, politicians, and scientists. Researchers will find materials representing Samuelson's work on diverse topics of economic theory, including the history of economic thought (post-Keynesian economics, neoclassical economics, and thinkers such as Marx, Sraffa and Ricardo), financial economics, growth theory, international finance, inflation, stability, welfare economics, post-World War economic policies and stabilization, stochastic analysis, utility, monetary policy, Marxist economics, biological economics - including population and gender studies, thermodynamics, and mathematical economics. Finally, the Samuelson Papers also document his strong contributions to the U.S. government, especially his work for the Federal Reserve, and to federally-funded projects, professional committees and boards, and organizations and societies, beginning in the 1940s and continuing throughout his career.

The Paul A. Samuelson Papers span the years 1933 to 2010, and cover nearly all aspects of his long career. Materials are arranged in the original order maintained by Samuelson, and include his professional correspondence files; unpublished writings, notes, drafts and fragments; audiovisual materials; documents regarding awards, including the Nobel Prize; files relating to various grants, committees, and projects; teaching materials from his years at MIT; files of speeches; and publication files, including professional and mainstream media articles. Significant correspondents include Milton Friedman, Don Patinkin, and Robert Solow, as well as many other notable economists, Nobel prize winners, politicians, and scientists. Material can also be found on economic programs at institutions such as MIT, where Samuelson established a renowned economics faculty. Researchers will find materials representing Samuelson's work on diverse topics of economic theory, including the history of economic thought (post-Keynesian economics, neoclassical economics, and thinkers such as Marx, Sraffa and Ricardo), financial economics, growth theory, international finance, inflation, stability, welfare economics, post-World War economic policies and stabilization, stochastic analysis, utility, monetary policy, Marxist economics, biological economics - including population and gender studies, thermodynamics, and mathematical economics. Samuelson's insights on many of these subjects serve as organizational themes for large sections in the Unpublished Writings Series in the collection. Finally, the Samuelson Papers also document his strong contributions to the U.S. government, especially his work for the Federal Reserve, and to federally-funded projects, professional committees and boards, and organizations and societies, beginning in the 1940s and continuing throughout his career.

The Correspondence Series spans Samuelson's entire career, beginning in the 1930s. It consists mainly of professional exchanges with his colleagues in the U.S. and other countries. There are also files of correspondence with a wide variety of political and academic figures, presses, and media organizations. There is frequent correspondence with President Kennedy, for whom he was an economic advisor. Besides the named folders that represent notable economists such as Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Franco Modigliani, Don Patinkin, and Robert Solow, there are general correspondence folders in which a variety of documents are chronologically arranged. There is also a large group of files relating to the publication of his textbooks. Additional correspondence can be found in almost all the other series. A more detailed documentation of the Correspondence Series and its correspondents can be found in the series description.

A large series of Unpublished Writings contains many folders of unpublished articles, extensive research notes, jotted-down insights, and other fragmentary writings. The earliest pieces appear to be a typescript of Samuelson's 1933 diary and writings on collective bargaining (1933-1934). The wide range of topics in economic theory as well as the history of economics reflects Samuelson's interests over many decades, beginning with his work on Marx and the Transformation Problem, and later on, focusing more specifically on financial economics. The unpublished writings also reveal that he also wrote extensively on population and gender studies, thermodynamics, and mathematics.

The equally large Printed Materials Series houses a nearly complete collection of Samuelson's published articles in addition to a few of his monographs. In some cases, article folders include extensive correspondence between Samuelson and his editors and publishers. There is a complete list of Samuelson's publications available to researchers in the library, but not every publication listed is present in the collection. Located in this series is a copy of the thesis that Samuelson wrote while he was at Harvard, which in 1947 was published as the well-known Foundations of Economic Analysis. Also present in this series are the many columns and articles he wrote for Newsweek in the 1960s and 1970s.

Other aspects of Samuelson's career can be found in course files which form the Teaching Materials Series, most of which contain reading lists and syllabi, and in the Committees and Projects Series, which contains information on his many consultancy roles, grant-funded projects, and professional service. Examples include projects for the Radiation Laboratory and the Rand Corporation, and contributions to government agencies such as the U.S. War Production Board and the Federal Reserve Board, as well as academic organizations such as the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Science and the Econometric Society.

The smallest series of the collection, the Awards Series contains materials relating to Samuelson's Nobel Prize in Economics in 1970 and his Medal of Science award in 1996. Files contain congratulatory letters and telegrams, and his outgoing correspondence to subsequent Nobel Prize winners. In contrast to this small series, the large Speeches and Interviews Series houses paper drafts or transcripts of nearly all of Samuelson's public presentations, amounting to over 400 lectures, speeches, and interviews. Some of these can also be found on recorded media in the Audiovisual Series.

The Audiovisual Materials Series features 320 cassettes from the commercially produced "Economics Cassettes Series," a set of interviews with Milton Friedman and Paul Samuelson on economics issues of the times. There are also a few tapes and cassettes of lectures and speeches by Samuelson. Items related to the topics and events represented in this series are also found in the Teaching Materials, Speeches and Interviews, and Awards Series. There is a DVD recording of the 2010 MIT memorial service which provides many images of Samuelson taken throughout his life, filling in for the absence of photographs in the collection. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use; listening or viewing copies may need to be made by staff for access. Please contact Research Services before coming to use this series.

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Paul Davidson papers, 1961-2004 and undated 13.5 Linear Feet — Apprpoximately 10,125 Items

Economist on the faculty at the University of Tennessee and editor of the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics. The Paul Davidson Papers span the years 1961-2004 and document his professional career and interests, including post-Keynesian economics; international monetary payments and global employment policies; monetary theory; income distribution; and energy economics. The collection almost exclusively consists of correspondence files, with the exception of a few clippings and speeches folders. The most notable group of correspondents are his fellow post-Keynesians such as Victoria Chick, Alfred Eichner, John Kenneth Galbraith, Geoff Harcourt, Jan Kregel, Hyman Minsky, Basil Moore, Luigi Pasinetti, Joan Robinson, Anthony Thirlwall, and Sidney Weintraub. Other correspondents of note include Philip Arestis, Peter Bernstein, Robert Clower, Robert Eisner, Sir John Hicks, Allan H. Meltzer, Edward Nell, Don Patinkin, James Tobin, and Paul Samuelson. Other large amounts of correspondence and other materials relate to Davidson's editorial work with many major economics journals, including the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, which he founded; these folders typically contain correspondence between Davidson, journal referees, and authors.

The Paul Davidson Papers span the years 1961-2004 and document his professional career and interests, including post-Keynesian economics; international monetary payments and global employment policies; monetary theory; income distribution; and energy economics. The collection almost exclusively consists of correspondence files, with the exception of a few clippings and speeches folders. The most notable group of correspondents are his fellow post-Keynesians such as Victoria Chick, Alfred Eichner, John Kenneth Galbraith, Geoff Harcourt, Jan Kregel, Hyman Minsky, Basil Moore, Luigi Pasinetti, Joan Robinson, Anthony Thirlwall, and Sidney Weintraub. Other correspondents of note include Philip Arestis, Peter Bernstein, Robert Clower, Robert Eisner, Sir John Hicks, Allan H. Meltzer, Edward Nell, Don Patinkin, James Tobin, and Paul Samuelson. Other large amounts of correspondence and other materials relate to Davidson's editorial work with many major economics journals, including the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, which he founded; these folders typically contain correspondence between Davidson, journal referees, and authors. In one group of folders, Davidson engages with other colleagues in sometimes heated exchanges about bias in professional journals. In addition to correspondence with colleagues and authors, the files also contain correspondence related to academic departments where Davidson held positions. Reflecting his broad background, the papers also document Davidson's involvement with politics (see the Congress folder) and consultancy work for an energy company in his early career (the Oil and Energy folders), and his role as an active public figure, documented by letters to the editor for various maistream publications.