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Alvin Roth papers, 1960s-2000 20.1 Linear Feet — 15075 Items

Roth is the George Gund Professor of Economics and Business Administration at Harvard University. His research interests include game theory, experimental economics, and market design. He won the Nobel Prize in 2012. Collection includes correspondence files, writings and research, writings by other economists, and some teaching material.

The collection offers a wealth of information from Roth's early career at the University of Pittsburgh, including his research and correspondence from that period, as well as drafts of some of his well-cited articles and writings. Approximately one-half of the material lies in the Correspondence and Working Papers series. This portion of the collection, arranged alphabetically by correspondent, includes professional correspondence as well as many drafts of scholarly articles. This arrangement replicates Roth's original filing system, which offers insight into his correspondence style and methodology for economics collaboration. Notable correspondents include Roy Weintraub, Robert Aumann, Ido Erev, Uriel Rothblum, and many more. Also included are various subject files, including Winner's Curse, Matching, and Learning.

Another notable component of the collection is Roth's Writings and Research, which includes both working drafts of Roth's own as well as data printouts and other components of his work in game theory and its real-world applications. These files have been grouped by article and are loosely arranged by date. Each article's co-writers or collaborators are noted if known.

The Writings by Others series has some overlap with the Correspondence and Working Drafts series, but for the most part the former includes only the article from Roth's fellow economists, without the collaborative or feedback aspect present in the latter series.

Roth's Teaching and Coursework series includes lecture notes as well as tools such as transparencies used during his economics lectures. Roth's own coursework at Stanford is also present, including notes, exams, syllabi, and lectures on topics such as microeconomics, competitive strategies, game theory, and choice theory.

Finally, the Grant Materials series is arranged by grant application, with each file including application materials, correspondence, reports, and finances relating to the grant.

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Nobel-prize winning economist, Professor at Arizona State University, and economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. The collection contains drafts and published copies of Prescott's research papers and other writings, professional correspondence, files from speaking engagements and presentations, and teaching materials from his career at Carnegie-Mellon University, the University of Minnesota, and Arizona State University.

The collection contains drafts and published copies of Prescott's research papers and other writings, writings by others, professional correspondence, files from speaking engagements and presentations, and teaching materials from his career at Carnegie-Mellon University, the University of Minnesota, and Arizona State University.

The Writings series contains drafts and published copies of research papers and academic articles written by Prescott and co-authors, including his 1964 dissertation "Adaptive Decision Rules for Macro Economic Planning" as well as writings with co-recipient of the Nobel Prize, Finn E. Kydland. They are arranged chronologically by publication date.

The Writings by Others series includes articles and other writings on economics collected by Prescott for his own research or interest. Arranged chronologically.

Engagements series includes materials from lectures, presentations, and speeches given by Prescott. Arranged chronologically.

Correspondence series contains letters, memos, and emails received or written by Prescott. General correspondence arranged chronologically. Other correspondence arranged by subject matter as provided by Prescott.

Teaching Materials series contains syllabi, lecture notes, exams, correspondence, and other preparatory materials for courses taught by Prescott at Carnegie-Mellon University, the University of Minnesota, and Arizona State University. Arranged chronologically.

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Kenneth J. Arrow papers, 1921-2017 142 Linear Feet — 94 boxes — 13.2 Gigabytes

Kenneth Arrow (1921-2017) was a Nobel Prize-winning economist and a professor of economics at Stanford University and Harvard University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, and other materials documenting his political and personal interests, as well as his collaborations and professional affiliations across the fields of economics, mathematics, public policy, and international relations.

The Kenneth Arrow Papers document his career as an economist, professor, and Nobel Laureate. The collection provides an overview of his many professional activities, along with his research, writings, and collected notes regarding topics such as microeconomics, contingent valuation, social choice theory, general equilibrium analysis, the economics of information, climate change, and endogenous-growth theories. The collection also documents his collaboration and communications with prominent economists such as Robert Aumann, Gerard Debreu, Frank Hahn, John Harsanyi, Leonid Hurwicz, Harold Hotelling, Tjalling Koopmans, Alain Lewis, Lionel McKenzie, Roy Radner, Martin Shubik, Herbert Simon, Robert Solow, and many others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Arrow's role as an expert witness during various legal cases involving anti-trust lawsuits, international trade, and public utilities; his professional consulting work for different groups and organizations; his political activism supporting different human rights organizations, including his involvement in agencies promoting peace in the Middle East, environmental regulation, arms reduction, and nuclear testing bans; his itineraries, lectures, and public engagements; administrative activities for various professional associations and conferences, including his leadership roles in the American Economic Association, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Beijer Institute, the Econometric Society, the International Economic Association, the Office of Naval Research, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Science, the National Bureau of Economic Research, and many more; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions in the Economics Departments of Stanford University, Harvard University, and the Santa Fe Institute. The collection also contains personal artifacts and documents from Arrow's childhood and early education; awards and honorary degrees, including the Clark Medal, the National Medal of Science, and materials from the Nobel Prize ceremony; assorted books from his personal library; various foreign editions of his published works, in multiple languages; and born-digital records with his email and other working documents.

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Lawrence Klein papers, 1950s-2010 52.5 Linear Feet — 40,000 items

Nobel-prize winning economist and professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. Collection includes Klein's correspondence, writings and drafts, economic research and subject files, organizational papers, and dissertations from Klein's many students. Contains significant amount of material from Project LINK, particularly from the late 1960s. Audiovisual recordings of the first LINK conference in 1969 will require reformatting prior to use. Also includes files from Klein's presidency of the National Academy of Science, his professorship at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, and printouts from early economic computer programs and experiments.

The collection includes Klein's correspondence, writings and drafts, economic research and subject files, organizational papers, and dissertations from Klein's many students. It contains significant amount of material from Project LINK, particularly from the late 1960s. Audiovisual recordings of the first LINK conference in 1969 will require reformatting prior to use. Also included are files from Klein's presidency of the National Academy of Science, his professorship at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, and printouts from early economic computer programs and experiments.

The Dissertations series includes copies and drafts of dissertations and theses written by Klein's students and advisees during his tenure at the University of Pennsylvania. They are arranged in alphabetical order by the author's name.

The Subjects, Organizations, and Research series includes subject files and materials on various publications, research topics, projects, and organizations with which Klein worked. This series includes many materials from his career at the University of Pennsylvania, including teaching materials and committee information, as well as his presidency of the National Academy of Sciences. It has been arranged alphabetically by folder title.

The Project LINK series contains records related to that project, for which Klein served as principal investigator along with Bert Hickman, Rudolf Rhomberg, and Aaron Gordon. Included are materials from various meetings, research materials, and reports.

The Computer Printouts series contains computer printouts from an unknown project, possibly Project LINK, dating from the early 1980s.

The Correspondence series contains letters, memos, and faxes received or written by Klein. Much of the correspondence was exchanged with colleagues in the field of economics, and reflects collaborative research endeavors. Arranged loosely by correspondent within each year. Not every year has incoming correspondence.

Writings by Klein includes papers and speeches written by Lawrence Klein for journals, newspapers, editorials, and congressional testimony.

Writings by Others includes non-dissertation writings on economics collected by Klein for his own research or interest.

Audiovisual Materials contains audio recordings of the first worldwide Project LINK conference in 1969. This material will need to be reformatted prior to use.

There is also a small amount of Unsorted Miscellaneous material.

In addition, a small amount of electronic media has been removed from the collection and transferred to Duke's server. Please contact Research Services for access to this material.

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Paul A. Samuelson papers, 1933-2010 and undated 119 Linear Feet — Approx. 88,950 Items

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Paul A. Samuelson was a Nobel Prize-winning economist and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Paul Samuelson papers span the years 1933 to 2010 and cover nearly all aspects of his long career. The collection is arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Awards, Committees and Projects, Correspondence, Printed Materials, Speeches and Interviews, Teaching Materials, and Unpublished Writings. Significant correspondents include Milton Friedman, Don Patinkin, and Robert Solow, and many other notable economists, Nobel prize winners, politicians, and scientists. Researchers will find materials representing Samuelson's work on diverse topics of economic theory, including the history of economic thought (post-Keynesian economics, neoclassical economics, and thinkers such as Marx, Sraffa and Ricardo), financial economics, growth theory, international finance, inflation, stability, welfare economics, post-World War economic policies and stabilization, stochastic analysis, utility, monetary policy, Marxist economics, biological economics - including population and gender studies, thermodynamics, and mathematical economics. Finally, the Samuelson Papers also document his strong contributions to the U.S. government, especially his work for the Federal Reserve, and to federally-funded projects, professional committees and boards, and organizations and societies, beginning in the 1940s and continuing throughout his career.

The Paul A. Samuelson Papers span the years 1933 to 2010, and cover nearly all aspects of his long career. Materials are arranged in the original order maintained by Samuelson, and include his professional correspondence files; unpublished writings, notes, drafts and fragments; audiovisual materials; documents regarding awards, including the Nobel Prize; files relating to various grants, committees, and projects; teaching materials from his years at MIT; files of speeches; and publication files, including professional and mainstream media articles. Significant correspondents include Milton Friedman, Don Patinkin, and Robert Solow, as well as many other notable economists, Nobel prize winners, politicians, and scientists. Material can also be found on economic programs at institutions such as MIT, where Samuelson established a renowned economics faculty. Researchers will find materials representing Samuelson's work on diverse topics of economic theory, including the history of economic thought (post-Keynesian economics, neoclassical economics, and thinkers such as Marx, Sraffa and Ricardo), financial economics, growth theory, international finance, inflation, stability, welfare economics, post-World War economic policies and stabilization, stochastic analysis, utility, monetary policy, Marxist economics, biological economics - including population and gender studies, thermodynamics, and mathematical economics. Samuelson's insights on many of these subjects serve as organizational themes for large sections in the Unpublished Writings Series in the collection. Finally, the Samuelson Papers also document his strong contributions to the U.S. government, especially his work for the Federal Reserve, and to federally-funded projects, professional committees and boards, and organizations and societies, beginning in the 1940s and continuing throughout his career.

The Correspondence Series spans Samuelson's entire career, beginning in the 1930s. It consists mainly of professional exchanges with his colleagues in the U.S. and other countries. There are also files of correspondence with a wide variety of political and academic figures, presses, and media organizations. There is frequent correspondence with President Kennedy, for whom he was an economic advisor. Besides the named folders that represent notable economists such as Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Franco Modigliani, Don Patinkin, and Robert Solow, there are general correspondence folders in which a variety of documents are chronologically arranged. There is also a large group of files relating to the publication of his textbooks. Additional correspondence can be found in almost all the other series. A more detailed documentation of the Correspondence Series and its correspondents can be found in the series description.

A large series of Unpublished Writings contains many folders of unpublished articles, extensive research notes, jotted-down insights, and other fragmentary writings. The earliest pieces appear to be a typescript of Samuelson's 1933 diary and writings on collective bargaining (1933-1934). The wide range of topics in economic theory as well as the history of economics reflects Samuelson's interests over many decades, beginning with his work on Marx and the Transformation Problem, and later on, focusing more specifically on financial economics. The unpublished writings also reveal that he also wrote extensively on population and gender studies, thermodynamics, and mathematics.

The equally large Printed Materials Series houses a nearly complete collection of Samuelson's published articles in addition to a few of his monographs. In some cases, article folders include extensive correspondence between Samuelson and his editors and publishers. There is a complete list of Samuelson's publications available to researchers in the library, but not every publication listed is present in the collection. Located in this series is a copy of the thesis that Samuelson wrote while he was at Harvard, which in 1947 was published as the well-known Foundations of Economic Analysis. Also present in this series are the many columns and articles he wrote for Newsweek in the 1960s and 1970s.

Other aspects of Samuelson's career can be found in course files which form the Teaching Materials Series, most of which contain reading lists and syllabi, and in the Committees and Projects Series, which contains information on his many consultancy roles, grant-funded projects, and professional service. Examples include projects for the Radiation Laboratory and the Rand Corporation, and contributions to government agencies such as the U.S. War Production Board and the Federal Reserve Board, as well as academic organizations such as the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Science and the Econometric Society.

The smallest series of the collection, the Awards Series contains materials relating to Samuelson's Nobel Prize in Economics in 1970 and his Medal of Science award in 1996. Files contain congratulatory letters and telegrams, and his outgoing correspondence to subsequent Nobel Prize winners. In contrast to this small series, the large Speeches and Interviews Series houses paper drafts or transcripts of nearly all of Samuelson's public presentations, amounting to over 400 lectures, speeches, and interviews. Some of these can also be found on recorded media in the Audiovisual Series.

The Audiovisual Materials Series features 320 cassettes from the commercially produced "Economics Cassettes Series," a set of interviews with Milton Friedman and Paul Samuelson on economics issues of the times. There are also a few tapes and cassettes of lectures and speeches by Samuelson. Items related to the topics and events represented in this series are also found in the Teaching Materials, Speeches and Interviews, and Awards Series. There is a DVD recording of the 2010 MIT memorial service which provides many images of Samuelson taken throughout his life, filling in for the absence of photographs in the collection. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use; listening or viewing copies may need to be made by staff for access. Please contact Research Services before coming to use this series.