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Typescript manuscript, "The obstetric forceps". On verso of the Medical Society of Delaware stationery. With corrections. Author's name printed below title.

Typescript manuscript, "The obstetric forceps". On verso of the Medical Society of Delaware stationery. With corrections. Author's name printed below title.

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The collection consists largely of professional papers including subject and research files, correspondence, and writings. Materials pertain to Hulka's involvement in the education, promotion, innovation, and application of women's and reproductive health. Specific topics include laparoscopy, abortion rights, contraception, professional organizations, medical procedures, and educational materials. The collection also includes examples of medical instruments (some of which were developed and patented by Hulka), especially a variety of international IUDs and other forms of contraception including the eponymous "Hulka clip." Also contains drawings and photographs of surgical procedures; educational and presentation slides; blueprints of medical instruments; and correspondence and essays provided by colleagues and students. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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ALS. Writes of cases of rupture of the uterus and provides the details of one particular case.

ALS. Writes of cases of rupture of the uterus and provides the details of one particular case.

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Holograph manuscript, signed. The manuscript was first published in 1759.

Holograph manuscript, signed. The manuscript was first published in 1759.

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Holograph signed. Typed English translation available. Desault concludes that section of the pubis is not a dangerous operation and that in certain cases it is preferable to the Cesarean section.

Holograph signed. Typed English translation available. Desault concludes that section of the pubis is not a dangerous operation and that in certain cases it is preferable to the Cesarean section.

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Takey Crist papers, 1944-2002 and undated 64.6 Linear Feet — 21,903 Items

Accession 2002-149(778 items, 22.0 linear feet; dated 1971-2001) contains files of abortion, pregnancy, and hysterectomy malpractice cases in which Crist served as a consultant or codefendant along with the Crist Clinic. There is also printed material on reproductive topics. Also includes 2 VHS videocassettes; 6 color slides; 30 black-and-white and 2 color photographs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition 2003-007 (67 items, 7.3 linear ft.; undated) is composed of 16mm films used by "Crist Clinic Audio Visuals" in health education programs (undated). The clinic also offered the films for sale or rent to educators, students, doctors, parents, and others. The majority of the films focus on sex education for children and teenagers. Topics include puberty and menstruation, sex and sexuality, sexual orientation, lifestyle choices, and sexually transmitted diseases. Other topics include abortion; pregnancy and childbirth; infant care and nutrition; marriage and parenting; and drug and alcohol abuse.

Addition 2003-118 is comprised of materials related to the issue of abortion and the anti-abortion movement, and consists primarily of documents pertaining to lawsuits involving Dr. Crist as a litigant or witness, including correspondence, transcripts, depositions, photographs, and other legal papers (1975-1993). Also contains files on organizations including the National Abortion Federation and NARAL (1982-2002 and undated); subject files; research material assembled by Dr. Crist, including publications; correspondence; and newspaper clippings.

Addition 2004-098 (10,158 items, 16.7 lin. ft.; dated 1962-1980s, bulk 1962-1972) comprises personal and professional correspondence and subject files (1960s-early 1970s) documenting Crist's medical training, internship, residency, and then his position as Assistant Professor at UNC Chapel Hill, especially his involvement in increased access to therapeutic abortions and health services; the development of abortion techniques; and sex and contraceptive education on and off campus. Also includes writings and speeches; patient notes (redacted); grant, research, and conference files; and printed materials, including clippings, articles, and pamphlets. Some anti-abortion materials in boxes 3-5 contain graphic imagery.

Addition 2006-098 (400 items, 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 1944-1978) consists of personal files, including medical licenses and report cards; abortion series files, 1971-2000, including general correspondence, correspondence concerning the National Organization of Women and the National Coalition of Abortion Providers; newsletters; printed material about the ordinance lawsuit; photographs of demonstrators, 1985; and subject files, 1960-1972, created while at UNC including files about conferences, homosexuality, consultation work for family planning, studies conducted while at UNC Medical School, speaking engagements on sex education; and Health Education Clinic finances. Interfiled in existing collection.

Addition 2007-043 (13,125 items, 21.0 linear feet) contains subject files that chronicle the history of the Crist Clinic from the opening of the clinic in 1973 to the early 21st century. The majority of the files contain Takey Crist's clippings on medical topics and issues relating to sex education and women's health care. Many files also refer to issues of significance for physicians running a private clinic.