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The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Ailecia Ruscin is a writer, activist, and scholar from San Antonio, Texas and Auburn, Alabama. She is the author or co-author of the zines provo-CAT-ive and alabama grrrl (published from 1997-2000).

The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Amy Mariaskin Zine collection, 1995-2005 3 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Amy Mariaskin began collecting and trading zines with other women as a member of the Pittsburgh, PA, Riot Grrrl Chapter from 1995-2002. She authored the zine Southern Fried Darling from 1995-2002, and Vortext, about meteorology and weather. Collection consists of about 150 zines, mostly self-published by women and girls in the United States. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, music, mental health, depression and mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, transgender issues, and race. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of about 150 zines, mostly self-published by women and girls in the United States. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, music, mental health, depression and mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, transgender issues, and race. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Arielle Greenberg is a poet, editor, and assistant professor in the English department at Columbia College, Chicago, Ill. This collection consists of 367 zines dated from 1973 to 1995, likely collected by the donor from 1992-1995. The collection primarily includes personal zines by women (though some are by men) that focus on the riot grrrl scene, feminism, punk music, and progressive political causes. Many of the zines include correspondence from the authors. The collection also includes personal correspondence and correspondence from zine authors between 1987 and 1995, with the bulk dating from 1993 to 1995.

This collection consists of 367 zines dated from 1973 to 1995, likely collected by the donor from 1992-1995. The collection primarily includes personal zines by women (though some are by men) that focus on the riot grrrl scene, feminism, punk music, and progressive political causes. Many of the zines include correspondence from the authors. The collection also includes personal correspondence and correspondence from zine authors between 1987 and 1995, with the bulk dating from 1993 to 1995. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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In 1996, Bitch: Feminst Response to Pop Culture was created by Lisa Jervis, Benjamin Shaykin, and Andi Zeisler. After having a hard time finding critiques of sexism in pop culture in magazines and self published zines, they decided to make their own. Their goals are to write about sexism in pop culture, propose alternatives, and promote pop products that are pro-woman and pro-feminism. Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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BUST Magazine records, 1993-2015 43.2 Linear Feet — 29625 Items

Debbie Stoller and Marcelle Karp began producing BUST, a third-wave feminist women's magazine, in New York, N.Y., in 1993 as a photocopied zine. Collection documents the behind-the-scenes work required to put together BUST. Materials include issues 1-15 and 20-86 of the magazine; layouts and copy-editing material; biographies of contributors; article submissions; column material (Girls, Fashions, The Shit, etc.); advertisement documentation; correspondence (letter and electronic mail); press coverage of BUST; promotional material; material related to the publication and promotion of the book The BUST Guide to the New Girl Order; and a variety of graphic items. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2001-0009) (1500 items; 2.0 lin. ft.; dated 1993-1998) documents the behind-the-scenes work required to put together BUST. Materials include issues 1-15 of the magazine; layouts and copy-editing material; biographies of contributors; article submissions; column material ("Girls,""Fashions,""The Shit," etc.); advertisement documentation; correspondence (letter and electronic mail); press coverage of BUST; promotional material; material related to the publication and promotion of the book The BUST Guide to the New Girl Order; and a variety of graphic items, including color (9) and black-and-white photographs (6), original black-and-white ink drawings, and color prints (23), as well as color slides (12).

Accession (2009-0082) (24 items; 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 2002-2007) consists of production binders for issues 20-43 of BUST magazine, published from summer 2002 through spring 2007. Each binder contains a copy of the published issue, as well as tabbed sections for each portion of the issue, including features, columns, regulars, sex files, and guides.

Accession (2010-0101) (7875 items; 10.5 lin. ft.; dated 1993-2006) includes production binders, files from the creative director, and files from the Art Department.

Accession (2013-0184) (10125 items; 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2011) consists of production binders for issues 44-71, published from 2008-2011.

Accession (2015-0040) (1400 items; 3 lin. ft.; dated 2010-2013) consists of production files for issues 64-73, production binders for issues 72-86, and 13 Syquest discs from issues 4-9.

Accession (2015-0097) (1700 items, 4 lin. ft.; dated 1997-2012) consists of production files for issues 10-50, Creative Director Laurie Henzel's notebooks, and graphic materials including original art, color and black and white photographs and color layouts.

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Clay Felker papers, 1945-1996 14 Linear Feet — 9000 Items

Clay Felker (1925-2008) was an editor and publisher who edited magazines such as New York Magazine (which he founded in 1968), New West Magazine, Village Voice, and Esquire. Collection includes materials from Felker's journalism career, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1968 through 1981. The majority of the materials relate to Felker's publishing and editorial work on New York Magazine, New West Magazine, Village Voice, Esquire, and Daily News Tonight. Included are story ideas and correspondence with various writers and editors; drafts of articles and columns; contract and legal negotiations; correspondence from Felker's fans and friends; budgetary materials; press clippings and news coverage; and other miscellaneous materials. Also includes copies of Duke University Chronicle, 1948-1952, dating from Felker's years as a writer and editor; copies of The Blue Jacket, 1944-1945, dating from Felker's years as a sports editor; some personal correspondence and materials from Felker's friends and family; and some other miscellaneous material.

Collection includes materials from Felker's journalism career, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1968 through 1981. The majority of the materials relate to Felker's publishing and editorial work on New York magazine, New West magazine, Village Voice, Esquire, and Daily News Tonight. The collection contains the publications' annual reports, financial projections and budgets, circulation and advertising plans, and materials from stockholder questionnaires and meetings. Also included are story ideas and correspondence with various writers and editors, as well as drafts of articles and columns. Many materials are anonymous and undated, because the author's name is missing from Felker's version of the draft. Some writers and journalists represented in the collection include George Dennison, Benjamin Sonnenberg, Gail Sheehy (Felker's third wife), Aaron Latham, Robert Karen, Thomas Thompson, Arnold Beichman, Jimmy Breslin, Jane O'Reilly, Andrew Tobias, and many more.

Other magazine-related materials include contract and legal negotiations, particularly regarding Felker's launch of New York; his loss of New York and Village Voice; his acquisition of Esquire, The Advertiser, and AdWeek; and his subsequent loss of Esquire. Correspondence between Felker and various law firms involved in these sales and mergers is also included. There are also many letters, both congratulatory and condoling, reacting to his various career changes. Many of his friends and fans were powerful figures in the publishing world, including George Lang, Marianne Partridge, Peter Derow, Felix Rohatyn, Tom Wolfe, Gloria Steinem, Herb Goro, and Malcolm Forbes.

Press clippings covering Felker's career are also present in the collection, beginning with his early journalism career in the 1960s, but heavily covering his various publication acquisitions and activities as editor of New York, New West, Village Voice, Esquire, and The Daily News Tonight. Besides reporting on the acquisitions, these clippings also include profiles of Felker as well as evaluations and criticisms of his work. One subcomponent of the clippings includes coverage of the 1976 CIA press leak by Daniel Schorr to the Village Voice and the subsequent Congressional investigations.

The collection also includes files and materials from Felker's years as a producer at 20th Century Fox, where he proposed and developed story ideas for television and movies. The files include synopses of proposed scripts as well as expense reports for some of the research and travel he undertook.

The remainder of the collection is somewhat miscellaneous in content. There are issues of The Blue Jacket, 1944-1945, dating from Felker's years as a sports editor. Also represented are Felker's years at Duke, including his articles and editorials in a few issues of The Archive and Duke 'n' Duchess, as well as bound copies of the Duke University Chronicle, 1948-1952, dating from Felker's years as a writer and editor. There are also small amounts of correspondence and reports from some of Felker's other interests and ventures, many of which never went past the planning stages. There is some personal correspondence and materials from Felker's friends and family, dating largely from the 1970s, and some other miscellaneous material.

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Dwayne Dixon Zine collection, ca. 1984-ca. 1995 2.5 Linear Feet — 224 Items

Dwayne Dixon was an employee in the Literacy Through Photography program at the Center for Documentary Studies. Collection includes 110 zines (150 items, ca. 1984-ca. 1995) produced across the United States and Central America and collected by Dixon throughout the 1990s. The majority of the zines demonstrate young men's search for life meaning, morality, and identity, especially through hardcore and punk music/lifestyle, including interviews with bands, album reviews, and criticism of the status quo. Other groups of zines were produced by children participating in various afterschool and enrichment programs in Durham, NC; by Central American women in Mexico, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and El Salvador; and by American young women raging against rape and sexism and searching for a less traditional sexual identity. Many zines include erotica, drawings, copies of photographs, and cartoons.

110 zines (150 items, ca. 1984-ca. 1995) produced across the United States and Central America and collected by Dixon throughout the 1990s. The majority of the zines demonstrate young men's search for life meaning, morality, and identity, especially through hardcore and punk music/lifestyle, including interviews with bands, album reviews, and criticism of the status quo. Other groups of zines were produced by children participating in various afterschool and enrichment programs in Durham, NC; by Central American women in Mexico, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and El Salvador; and by American young women raging against rape and sexism and searching for a less traditional sexual identity. Many zines include erotica, drawings, copies of photographs, and cartoons. Online searchable database includes more detailed descriptions of the first accession of this collection. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Collection of incarceration and anarchist publications produced by South Chicago ABC Zine Distro. Collection consists of 103 zines and drawings which include works most notably by Mumia Abu-Jamal, Sundiata Acoli, Ashanti Alston Omowali, David Gilbert and his son, Chesa Boudin, Kevin "Rashid" Johnson, Dennis Kyne, Anthony Rayson, Bobby Sands, Sean Swain, and Harold H. Thompson.

The Incarceration Zine Collection covers 1995 to 2007. Contents are almost exclusively produced by the South Chicago ABC Zine Distro publishing group, led by Anthony Rayson. A significant portion of this collection include essays by Rayson. The collection is predominately zines, most of which are written by Anarchists. Additional items are ABC Zine Distro catalogues and a few pieces of inmate art.

Most zines are original creations, though some pieces are reproduced texts by other authors. These works include Anarchist Morality by Peter Kroptokin, chapter 1 of Black Panther Party (Reconsidered) edited by Charles E. Jones, and The Diary of Bobby Sands.

Zines include republished pieces of famous inmates, including poetry and writings by Weather Underground member David Gilbert and political prisoners Mumia Abu-Jamal and Harold H. Thompson. Some pieces have an international focus, covering topics such as Vietnam, the Russian Revolution, and the El Mozote massacre. Domestic issues covered include race in the prison system, the resurgence of the Black Panther Party, revolutionary organizing in prison, Native American rights, and growth of the prison-industrial system.

Noted authors in this collection in Mumia Abu-Jamal, Sundiata Acoli, David Gilbert, Kevin "Rashid" Johnson, Dennis Kyne, Ashanti Alston Omowali, Anthony Rayson, Bobby Sands, Sean Swain, and Harold H. Thompson.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive (Duke University).

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Lara Cohen Zine collection, 1992-1996 9 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

Lara Langer Cohen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. She started collecting zines, including trading zines and corresponding with Sarah Dyer, in the early 1990s. The collection consists of approximately 280 zine titles (some with multiple issues) collected by Cohen and several hundred pieces of correspondence addressed to her or to her zines, Runt and Oh Oh Cheri, dating from the 1990s. Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of approximately 280 zine titles (some with multiple issues) collected by Cohen and several hundred pieces of correspondence addressed to her during the 1990s. The collection is arranged into two series: Zines and Correspondence. The zines have been divided into sub-series based on editorship by women, men, or both, and within each sub-series, alphabetized by title. The zines primarily focus on popular culture, opinion pieces, and music. Letters in the Correspondence Series are mostly addressed to "Lara" and "Runt," Cohen's zine, with standard mailing envelopes and self-made envelopes using re-purposed materials. The correspondence is arranged chronologically. Along with letters, the series includes postcards, greeting cards, flyers, photographs, and pamphlets. Most of the correspondence includes requests for zines or personal notes to Lara.

Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Libby Gilbert Zine collection, 1986-1995 3 Linear Feet — 112 Items

Zine collector and publisher. Gilbert's zines include The Ten Condiments (1988-1989) and Ancient Grandma Secrets (1990-1997). Collection includes Gilbert's zines, acquired through trade, purchase, or self-publishing. Most zines focus on music or culture. Collection is arranged alphabetically by zine title.

In February 2012, Libby Gilbert donated her personal collection of music zines and magazines, comprising 47 different titles and over 100 issues in total. Originally obtained through trade, purchase, or self-publishing, the titles in her collection span the years 1981-1996, and the common thread is the underground rock music scene in the United States and abroad, with particular focus on the Pacific Northwest, where she lived during much of that time. In 1988 and 1989, she published music and poetry zine The Ten Condiments with Kaija Campos (then Kaija Berleman), and later published her own music zine, Ancient Grandma Secrets, from 1990-1997. During the 1980s, her favorite musical sub-genre was second-wave garage psychedelic rock. To this day she remains a sucker for a well-crafted melody.