Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Subject Photographers -- Mexico Remove constraint Subject: Photographers -- Mexico

Search Results

collection icon
online icon
Gertrude Duby Blom (1901-1993) was a Swiss-born journalist, anthropologist, and environmental activist who documented the cultures of indigenous Mayan people in the jungle highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. Collection comprises 71 black-and-white exhibit prints featuring images taken by Gertrude Duby Blom between 1941 and 1979 in the highland jungles and towns of the state of Chiapas, Mexico. The photographs were printed in 1982 by Barry Norris, Blom's close friend and collaborator, for a traveling exhibition that opened in 1984 in New York City. The landscapes and portraits depict the cultural and ecological environments inhabited by individuals and groups of indigenous Maya, predominantly the Lacandon; there are also images of Latino immigrants to the region, chiefly lumber industry workers and their families, and other townspeople in San Cristobal. Scenes from camps and towns portray mealtimes, hunting and gathering expeditions, agricultural customs, religious ceremonies, folk Catholicism and its rituals, classrooms, medical clinics, and street scenes. Later images attest to the destruction of native ecosystems and the rapidly changing culture of the indigenous peoples. The matted gelatin silver prints vary in size from 11x14 to 22x22 inches; there is also one 26x26 inch matted print. Accompanying the photographs are project correspondence, notes, publicity, and other materials (1983-20043) documenting the collaboration between Alex Harris, documentary photographer from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, and individuals in Mexico and the U.S., which resulted in a major exhibit, "People of the forest: photographs of the Maya by Getrude Blom," launched in 1984, and the publication of "Gertrude Blom: bearing witness" (1984). Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 71 black-and-white exhibit prints featuring images taken by anthropologist, activist, and journalist Gertrude Duby Blom between 1941 and 1979 in the highland jungles and towns of the state of Chiapas, Mexico. The photographs were printed in 1982 by Barry Norris, Blom's close friend and collaborator, for a major exhibition of her work that opened in 1984 in New York City.

The landscapes and portraits taken by Blom depict the cultural and ecological environments inhabited by indigenous Maya, predominantly the Lacandon, but also neighboring Tzotzil and Tzeltal; there are also images of Latino immigrants to the region, chiefly lumber industry workers and their families, and other townspeople in San Cristobal. Scenes from camps and towns portray mealtimes, hunting and gathering expeditions, agricultural customs, religious ceremonies, folk Catholicism and its rituals, classrooms, medical clinics, and street scenes. Later images attest to the destruction of native ecosystems and the rapidly changing culture of the indigenous peoples. The matted gelatin silver prints vary in size from 11x14 to 22x22 inches; there is also one 26x26 inch matted print.

Accompanying the photographs are files of project correspondence, notes, publicity, and other materials (1983-2004) documenting the collaboration between Alex Harris, documentary photographer of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, and individuals in Mexico and the U.S., which resulted in a major international traveling exhibit, "People of the forest: photographs of the Maya by Getrude Blom," launched in 1984, and the publication of a book of essays and images, "Gertrude Blom: bearing witness" (1984), edited by Alex Harris and Margaret Sartor.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

International history of photography collection, 1885-1951 3 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 11 prints — 11 Items

Collection dates from 1885-1951 and comprises eleven vintage photographic prints by individuals considered to be master photographers. The prints are intended to represent major formats, techniques, and genres of the 19th and 20th centuries. Photographers whose prints are in the collection hail from Europe, the United States, and Mexico: Eugène Atget (printed by Berenice Abbot), Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, F. Holland Day, Peter Henry Emerson, Lewis Hine, Aaron Siskind, Ralph Steiner, Alfred Stieglitz, and Minor White. Formats range from photogravures to gelatin silver prints, with the latter predominating; all are black-and-white and matted. Subjects include rural landscapes, individual and group portraits, and urban streetscapes. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The International History of Photography collection dates from 1885-1951 and comprises eleven vintage photographic prints by individuals considered to be master photographers. The prints in this collection were acquired and assembled by the Rubenstein library staff, in part to provide students the opportunity to view and study original works from the world's foremost photographers as well as to learn about the major formats, techniques, and genres of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Photographers whose prints are in the collection hail from Europe, Mexico, and the United States: Eugène Atget (printed by American photographer Berenice Abbot), Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, F. Holland Day, Peter Henry Emerson, Lewis Hine, Aaron Siskind, Ralph Steiner, Alfred Stieglitz, and Minor White. The print by Eugène Atget, "Flower Man," was printed by well-known American photographer Berenice Abbot, who purchased part of Atget's negative archive in 1928.

Formats range from photogravures to gelatin silver prints, with the latter predominating; all are black-and-white and are matted. Subjects include rural landscapes, individual and group portraits, architecture, and urban streetscapes. The prints are sized from 4.5 x 6.5 inches to approximately 9.5 x 13.5 inches, and are all matted.

Researchers must wear gloves when handling the prints. Prints should always be picked up and supported with two hands. The prints cannot be removed from the mats, but researchers may open the window mat to see the full print. The Archive of Documentary Arts Curator must be consulted prior to any display of the photographs.

Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts at Duke University.