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"Bill" Burk, retired, botany librarian at the John N. Couch Biology Library, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Collection comprises three folders of letters written to Burk by botanist Sherwin Carlquist. The majority of the letters are accompanied by examples of Carlquist's black-and-white 8"x10" landscape photographs, including seven photographic prints on enlarging paper, as well as scanned copies printed on a laser printer. There are also advertisements for Carlquist's books of landscape photographs featuring male nudes. The letters are most often general holiday greetings Carlquist mailed to all his friends, usually annotated with specific notes to Burk; others are personal letters to Burk. Carlquist's letters mainly provide information regarding the accompanying photographs and his artistic approach to photography, especially the male nudes; there is additional commentary on the history of botany; his writing, publication, and research projects; the work of other scientists; and his personal life. Other topics include gay fiction and culture, the challenges of being gay in academe, and circumcision. Books mentioned include: HAWAII, OUTSIDERS, COMPARATIVE WOOD ANATOMY, TARWEEDS AND SILVERSWORDS, THE NATURAL MALE, MAN/NATURE, NATURAL MANSCAPES, MEN IN NATURE, UNCUT, and NATURAL OBJECTS.

Collection comprises three folders of letters written to Burk by botanist Sherwin Carlquist. The majority of the letters are accompanied by examples of Carlquist's black-and-white 8"x10" landscape photographs, including seven photographic prints on enlarging paper, as well as scanned copies printed on a laser printer. There are also advertisements for Carlquist's books of landscape photographs featuring male nudes. The letters are most often general holiday greetings Carlquist mailed to all his friends, usually annotated with specific notes to Burk; others are personal letters to Burk. Carlquist's letters mainly provide information regarding the accompanying photographs and his artistic approach to photography, especially the male nudes; there is additional commentary on the history of botany; his writing, publication, and research projects; the work of other scientists; and his personal life. Other topics include gay fiction and culture, the challenges of being gay in academe, and circumcision. Books mentioned include: HAWAII, OUTSIDERS, COMPARATIVE WOOD ANATOMY, TARWEEDS AND SILVERSWORDS, THE NATURAL MALE, MAN/NATURE, NATURAL MANSCAPES, MEN IN NATURE, UNCUT, and NATURAL OBJECTS.

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Farm Security Administration photographs, 1939-1942, 1939-1942 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 11 photographic prints

Collection of eleven color photographs taken from 1939 to 1942 by Farm Security Administration photographers Jack Delano (7 prints), Russell Lee (3 prints) and Marion Post Wolcott (1 print). The prints are sized 11 x 14 inches, and were created in the 1980s by photograph collector and gallery owner Tennyson Schad, using the dye transfer process. Subjects are diverse and include industrial settings such as a Pennsylvania steel mill and a sawmill in Maine; rural settings such as a wheat field in Washington State and tobacco cultivation in Puerto Rico; and scenes with people, including a group of African Americans fishing near a cotton plantation in Mississippi. Together, the images reveal the subject and stylistic choices made by these notable photographers commissioned for the FSA project. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of eleven color photographs taken from 1939 to 1942 by Farm Security Administration photographers Jack Delano (7 prints), Russell Lee (3 prints) and Marion Post Wolcott (1 print). The color prints are sized 11 x 14 inches, with image sizes ranging from 6 1/2 x 9 3/4 to 10 x 13 inches. They were created by photograph collector and gallery owner Tennyson Schad in the 1980s, using the dye transfer process.

Subjects include industrial settings such as a Pennsylvania steel mill and a sawmill in Maine; rural settings such as a wheat field in Washington State; and photographs of people, including a group of African Americans fishing near a cotton plantation in Mississippi. There are several photographs of tobacco cultivation and communities in Puerto Rico, where photographer Jack Delano settled short after this project. Together, the images reveal the diverse subject and stylistic choices made by these notable photographers commissioned for the FSA project.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Gjon Mili photographs, circa 1939-1949 0.25 Linear Feet — 1 flat box — 20 prints — 20 prints

Collection comprises 20 gelatin silver prints of images taken during the 1930s and 1940s by photographer Gjon Milin. Through new tecniques of strobe lighting and electronic flash which Mili developed at MIT, the black-and-white images, some of which were used by Life magazine, portray human locomotion and the movements of other physical phenomena such as cascading water, frozen in time. Human subjects include two African American children playing with paddleballs, a man in the shower, a man aiming a racket at a shuttlecock, and female nudes. One image is of the photographer Mili photographing a stream of water with his camera. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 20 gelatin silver prints taken during the 1930s and 1940s by photographer Gjon Mili. Using new techniques of strobe lighting and electronic flash that he developed at MIT, Mili created stop-action and multi-image frames portraying the movement of the human body (reminiscent of the more scientific locomotion studies of Étienne Jules Marey and Eadward Muybridge) and of objects such as an egg breaking in a pan, a jet from a siphon bottle, and a cascade of water. Human subjects in the collection include two African American children playing with paddleballs, a man in the shower, a man aiming a racket at a shuttlecock, and female nudes. One image is of Mili photographing a stream of water with his camera.

The prints range in size from 8x10 to 11x14 inches. Most are vintage prints, created from the 1930s to the 1940s; only one bears a date - 1943. A few are mounted on thin board, but the majority are unmounted paper prints. All are stamped with the photographer's name and "From the Richard Checani Collection." One print bears the stamp "Life Photo, to use" referring to Mili's work for the magazine. A few bear penciled captions such as "cartwheel" and "nude descending a staircase," and one penciled notation explains the genesis of the image: "Full frame (35 mm) shot by Wallace Kirkland, who was at my side, G [jon]." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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International history of photography collection, 1885-1951 3 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 11 prints — 11 Items

Collection dates from 1885-1951 and comprises eleven vintage photographic prints by individuals considered to be master photographers. The prints are intended to represent major formats, techniques, and genres of the 19th and 20th centuries. Photographers whose prints are in the collection hail from Europe, the United States, and Mexico: Eugène Atget (printed by Berenice Abbot), Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, F. Holland Day, Peter Henry Emerson, Lewis Hine, Aaron Siskind, Ralph Steiner, Alfred Stieglitz, and Minor White. Formats range from photogravures to gelatin silver prints, with the latter predominating; all are black-and-white and matted. Subjects include rural landscapes, individual and group portraits, and urban streetscapes. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The International History of Photography collection dates from 1885-1951 and comprises eleven vintage photographic prints by individuals considered to be master photographers. The prints in this collection were acquired and assembled by the Rubenstein library staff, in part to provide students the opportunity to view and study original works from the world's foremost photographers as well as to learn about the major formats, techniques, and genres of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Photographers whose prints are in the collection hail from Europe, Mexico, and the United States: Eugène Atget (printed by American photographer Berenice Abbot), Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, F. Holland Day, Peter Henry Emerson, Lewis Hine, Aaron Siskind, Ralph Steiner, Alfred Stieglitz, and Minor White. The print by Eugène Atget, "Flower Man," was printed by well-known American photographer Berenice Abbot, who purchased part of Atget's negative archive in 1928.

Formats range from photogravures to gelatin silver prints, with the latter predominating; all are black-and-white and are matted. Subjects include rural landscapes, individual and group portraits, architecture, and urban streetscapes. The prints are sized from 4.5 x 6.5 inches to approximately 9.5 x 13.5 inches, and are all matted.

Researchers must wear gloves when handling the prints. Prints should always be picked up and supported with two hands. The prints cannot be removed from the mats, but researchers may open the window mat to see the full print. The Archive of Documentary Arts Curator must be consulted prior to any display of the photographs.

Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Jessie Vanderbilt McNamee was born in 1874 to a wealthy family residing in Staten Island, New York (Richmond County). In 1901 she married Charles Dewar Simons(1874-1922) and they had one child, Charles Dewar, Jr. Ms. Simons served as a volunteer ambulance driver with the Dongan Hills Motor Corps; helped found and served as the ranking member of the Richmond County chapter of the Red Cross Motor Corps during World War I; served as Vice President of the National Federated Workers for Disabled Soldiers; and was an active member of the Veteran Association of Women War Workers. Her travels throughout Europe during the 1920s and 1930s are documented in diaries, correspondence, and other materials in this collection. Ms. Simons was a friend and neighbor of Alice Austen, a noted photographer who also served in the Richmond County Motor Corps. The Jessie Vanderbilt Simons papers contain materials dating from 1870 to 1936, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1890 to 1936. Materials in the collection primarily document Simons' travels through Europe during the 1920s and 1930s and her work with the Richmond County chapter of the American Red Cross Motor Corps. Twenty-nine yearly diaries detail daily life, family life, travel, participation in the Motor Corps, and other philanthropic activities. Correspondence with her son, family, and friends is also included; as are receipts, invoices, and other financial materials, primarily from travel to Europe; correspondence, printed materials, a scrapbook, and other items documenting Simons' service with the American Red Cross Motor Corps; material relating to friend, photographer, and fellow Motor Corps member Alice Austen; and photographs.

The Jessie Vanderbilt Simons papers contain materials dating from 1870 to 1936, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1890 to 1936. Materials in the collection primarily document Simons' travels through Europe during the 1920s and 1930s and her work with the Richmond County chapter of the American Red Cross Motor Corps. Twenty-nine yearly diaries detail daily life, family life, travel, participation in the Motor Corps, and other philanthropic activities. Correspondence with her son, family, and friends is also included; as are receipts, invoices, and other financial materials, primarily from travel to Europe; correspondence, printed materials, a scrapbook, and other items documenting Simons' service with the American Red Cross Motor Corps; material relating to friend, photographer, and fellow Motor Corps member Alice Austen; and photographs.

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Jim Dow photographs, 1966-2018 18.5 Linear Feet — 41 boxes — The great majority of the negative sheets measure 8x10 inches, with a minority measuring 4x5 inches.

Collection consists of approximately 1905 black-and-white and color sheet negatives from the archive of photographer Jim Dow, representing images printed, published, and exhibited from 1966 to 2018. The photographs document Dow's extensive travels chiefly in Argentina, Uruguay, England, Mexico, and the United States. He is best known for his studies of U.S. 20th century vernacular architecture and landscapes in New England, the U.S. West, Midwest, and the South, with a focus on North Dakota and Massachusetts; for his multi-panel images of sports stadiums and athletic fields, chiefly in the U.S. and U.K.; and for his striking images of private club interiors in New York City, and the architecture and interiors of large public buildings such as churches, museums, universities, and civic buildings in cities around the world. Also featured are his series on food trucks, taco trucks, and their equivalents, "carritos," in Mexico and South America. Regardless of location, many of Dow's photographs include details of outdoor advertising and cultural expressions such as murals, handpainted signs, bar decor, and graffiti. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection consists of approximately 1905 black-and-white and color film negatives from the archive of photographer Jim Dow, representing images printed, published, and exhibited from 1966 to 2018. The images document Dow's extensive travels chiefly in Argentina, Uruguay, England, Mexico, and across much of the United States. There are also images from Canada, Portugal and Scotland. The great majority of the images were shot with an 8x10 inch view camera and color film; the black-and-white negatives measure 4x5 inches and represent his earliest work taken on the road in the U.S.

Dow's images most frequently document exterior architecture and interior spaces with few or no people visible. He is best known for his studies of U.S. 20th century vernacular architecture and landscapes in New England, the U.S. West, the Midwest, and Southern States; for his multi-panel panoramas of baseball, football, and soccer stadiums and athletic fields, chiefly in the U.S., Canada, and U.K.; and for his striking images of private club interiors in New York City, and the architecture and interiors of large public buildings such as churches, museums, and civic buildings in cities around the world.

His earliest images were taken on the road in almost every region of the lower 48 states, beginning in 1966 and continuing through 2018. Starting out in black-and-white then soon transitioning to color, they document small towns and roadside attractions, well-worn business facades, and gathering places such as barbequeue joints, bars, event halls, and diners. North Dakota features prominently, as do Wyoming, Texas, Louisiana, California, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Closely related to these are his series on U.S. food trucks and taco trucks, and "carritos," their equivalents in Mexico and South America. Regardless of location, many of Dow's photographs include details of outdoor advertising and cultural expressions such as murals, handpainted signs, bar decor, and graffiti.

The last series in the collection represents commissioned work, and chiefly consists of portfolios taken at New England universities and private schools such as MIT, Yale, Tufts, Vassar, and Phillips Academy (1985-2008).

The negatives in the collection form the first installment of the photographer's archive at Duke University. Additions of corresponding prints, slides, and papers are anticipated.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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John K. Hillers was an important early American photographer and one of the first to photograph the Grand Canyon and the high plateaus of central and southern Utah. Collection contains albumen photographs spanning the years 1871-1889. Most of them are landscapes made in Utah, but there are also landscapes from California and several photographs of Native Americans made in New Mexico. The photographs are organized into six series.

John K. Hillers, one of America's most important early photographers, was one of the first to photograph the Grand Canyon and most of the high plateaus of central and southern Utah. In the fall of 1872, at the request of the Western lands survey, Hillers turned his lens from features of the landscape to its Native American inhabitants and photographed the Zuni and San Juan Pueblos. The 40 single albumen photographs and the 539 prints in the photograph album in this collection span the years 1871-1889.

Of the 40 single photographs in the collection, 33 are landscapes, many of which Hillers made in Utah. Five of the landscapes are from California. Seven photographs portray Native Americans, primarily Pueblo and Zuni in New Mexico. These photographs are organized into six series: Official Identification of the Survey Series, Gold Border Series, Indian Series, 1873 Powell Survey Series, Black Border Series, and the California Series.

The photograph album added to this collection contains 539 original albumen prints, most of which were taken by Hillers on the Second Expedition; others were taken by E. O. Beaman and James Fennemore on the same Expedition. The majority are from the Colorado River region in Colorado and Utah, and feature landscapes and vistas, expedition camps, Paiute Indians, and natural features. The prints may have been assembled by Hillers himself, or by John Powell as a gift for a patron or Congressman.

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John Willis photographs, 2009-2011 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 6 prints

John Willis created these six composite color images to articulate and consider the connections between photographic portraits taken by the Khmer Rouge of young people in Tuol Sleng prison in Phnom Penh, where an estimated 14,000-20,000 victims were executed from about 1975-1979, and images of deteriorating mural frescoes at the Emperor's Palace, also in Phnom Penh. The portraits are said to be of prison workers, and were exhibited in 2008 at the prison, now a genocide museum. Five of the historical photographs are portraits; the sixth shows a group of what appears to be Khmer Rouge soldiers in uniform. The photographer's images show that the original photographs on exhibit were defaced with graffiti and other marks by visitors to the museum. The neglected Emperor's Palace frescoes, whose images flank the victim's portraits in Willis' work, depict scenes from the Cambodian epic poem, the Reamker, which speaks to human issues of love, revenge, loyalty, and trust. The color inkjet prints were created from 2009 to 2011. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

American photographer John Willis created these six composite color images to articulate and consider the connections between photographic portraits taken by the Khmer Rouge of young people in Tuol Sleng prison in Phnom Penh, where an estimated 14,000-20,000 victims were executed from about 1975-1979, and images of deteriorating mural frescoes at the Emperor's Palace, also in Phnom Penh.

The portraits are said to be of prison workers, and were exhibited in 2008 at the prison, now a genocide museum. Five of the historical photographs are portraits; the sixth shows a group of what appears to be Khmer Rouge soldiers in uniform. The photographer's images show that the original photographs on exhibit at the genocide museum were defaced with graffiti and other marks by visitors.

Images of the neglected Emperor's Palace frescoes flank the victim's portraits, creating dramatic diptychs and triptychs, and depict scenes from the Cambodian epic poem, the Reamker, which speaks to human issues of love, revenge, loyalty, and trust.

The six color inkjet prints measure approximately 7x15 inches and were created from 2009 to 2011.

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Life Savers are a brand of hard and soft candies first produced in 1912, currently owned by Mars. Collection consists of approximately 150 items: matted advertising, display and promotional designs; black and white photographs; and negatives that depict a variety of campaigns to market Life Savers in early and mid-century United States. Included are photographs of models in various poses; candy displays (including displays of competitors such as Curtiss's Baby Ruth/Butterfinger and Pine Bros. Glycerin Tablets); celebrities posing with the candy in endorsement or other promotional campaign; street vendors (Life Savers Sampler Girls); and images of placements of the candy in film productions. Celebrities include Ann Rutherford, Edgar Bergen, George McManus, George Raft, Jack Benny, Lou Costello, Maggie Jiggs and Virginia Mayo. Images produced by a number of prominent photographers and agencies, including Acme Newspictures, Ewing Galloway, General Outdoor, Guy Gillette, Hyman Fink, Keystone View, McArthur Advertising, Shigeta-Wright, and the Vacuum Candy Machinery Company. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection consists of approximately 150 items: matted advertising, display and promotional designs; black and white photographs; and negatives that depict a variety of campaigns to market Life Savers in early and mid-century United States. Included are photographs of models in various poses; candy displays (including displays of competitors such as Curtiss's Baby Ruth/Butterfinger and Pine Bros. Glycerin Tablets); celebrities posing with the candy in endorsement or other promotional campaign; street vendors (Life Savers Sampler Girls); and images of placements of the candy in film productions. Celebrities include Ann Rutherford, Edgar Bergen, George McManus, George Raft, Jack Benny, Lou Costello, Maggie Jiggs and Virginia Mayo. Images produced by a number of prominent photographers and agencies, including Acme Newspictures, Ewing Galloway, General Outdoor, Guy Gillette, Hyman Fink, Keystone View, McArthur Advertising, Shigeta-Wright, and the Vacuum Candy Machinery Company. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

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Lynn Saville photographs, 1972-2015 and undated 21.5 Linear Feet — 20 boxes — 295 items

The collection dates from 1972 to 2015 and consists of over 200 large color and black-and-white photographic prints of nighttime scenes selected from the work of photographer Lynn Saville in urban centers such as Paris, Rome, Venice, New York City, Durham, North Carolina, Los Angeles, Vermont, and other locations. The collection also includes 30 portraits of artists, feminists, writers, family members, and other individuals, as well as self-portraits. Supplemental materials such as book reviews and book maquettes round out the collection. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection consists of selections of work from photographer Lynn Saville's portraiture and night photography from urban America, dating from 1972-2015. Formats include traditional darkroom gelatin silver prints, color prints, and a small number of digital prints. Sizes range from 11x14 to 20x24 inches.

The Portraits series includes 30 images of poets, photographers, family members, friends, and prominent women such as Barbara Jordan, Adrienne Rich and Bella Abzug. The collection's primary focus, however, is Saville's more recent work, housed in the Nocturnal Photography and Dark City series, containing 205 photographs of night scenes in the United States and Europe, particularly New York City (with a focus on Brooklyn) and Paris. Other locations include Los Angeles, North Carolina, Vermont, Paris, Rome, and Venice.

Selected images are also available online as part of a Duke University Libraries digital exhibit.

There is also a Supplemental Materials series which includes printed matter such as articles and book reviews, and a documentary film directed by Anna Borden about Saville's career and photography (2003).

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.