Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Subject Physicians -- Diaries Remove constraint Subject: Physicians -- Diaries

Search Results

container icon
Box 3, Folder 2
online icon

In the casebook, Rush provided brief histories for his treatment of about 75 individuals. Entries generally included the year, patient's name, presented medical issue, dates of treatment, prescriptions applied, pulses noted, and the progression or resolution of the problem. Rheumatism was the most common complaint, along with dropsy (edema), pneumonia, diarrhea, and mania. Among the other illnesses listed were palsy (paralysis), fever, typhus, epilepsy, consumption, scurvy, hydrothorax, swelled spleen, and hysteria.

collection icon
Dr. Marmaduke M. Haworth was born 20 January 1823 in Guilford County, N.C., and died 23 March 1894 in Franklinville, Randolph County, N.C. He served the Franklinville area as a physician. He married Mary McMasters in 1852 and the couple had three children, Pandora, Viola, and Elizabeth. Collection comprises Haworth's medical diary and journal (approximately 156 pages), including his notes on treatment of physical ailments and on childbirth in the rural south before and after the Civil War. Haworth studied medicine at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia; he recorded the purchase of this notebook at Auner's bookstore to be used for his medical notes during 1846-1847. At the beginning he listed the titles and prices for the medical reference books he purchased. He then recorded 30 pages of remedies and cures, and provided a 4-page manuscript index to this material bound in at the back of the volume. He also included notes on course instruction (at one point mentioning the lectures of Nathaniel Chapman). The balance of the volume is, however, a record of over 750 obstetric deliveries that Haworth accomplished during his career, some with full case histories. The organization of the notebook is somewhat confused because Haworth stitched in pages with notes written longitudinally among the original medical course lecture notes he retained. The obstetric entries date from 1846-1894; there are two clippings inserted, one dated 1908.

Collection comprises Haworth's medical diary and journal (approximately 156 pages), including his notes on treatment of physical ailments and on childbirth in the rural south before and after the Civil War. Haworth studied medicine at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia; he recorded the purchase of this notebook at Auner's bookstore to be used for his medical notes during 1846-1847. At the beginning he listed the titles and prices for the medical reference books he purchased. He then recorded 30 pages of remedies and cures, and provided a 4-page manuscript index to this material bound in at the back of the volume. He also included notes on course instruction (at one point mentioning the lectures of Nathaniel Chapman). The balance of the volume is, however, a record of over 750 obstetric deliveries that Haworth accomplished during his career, some with full case histories. The organization of the notebook is somewhat confused because Haworth stitched in pages with notes written longitudinally among the original medical course lecture notes he retained. The obstetric entries date from 1846-1894; there are two clippings inserted, one dated 1908.

collection icon

Warner Wells collection, 1945-1972 3 Linear Feet — 1 records storage box; 1 boxed scroll; 1 volume

Drafts and other preparatory materials for the publication of Hiroshima Diary, originally written in Japanese by Dr. Michihiko Hachiya and translated and edited into English by Dr. Warner Wells and Dr. Neal Tsukifuji in 1955. The collection also includes clippings and press coverage of the book's publication; a scroll painted by Shuka Takahashi; and miscellaneous printed materials discussing Hiroshima.

The bulk of the collection consists of holograph and typescript drafts of Hiroshima Diary and its earlier iterations. Early versions are holograph copies prepared in Japanese by Michihiko Hachiya or his wife, Yaeko Hachiya. English translations initially titled as Hiroshima Atom Bomb Gossip later evolved to the 1955 galleys for Hiroshima Diary.

The collection also includes several disbound folios of press clippings and comments following the volume's publication; assorted stray correspondence from Hachiya; photographs from Hiroshima, including the city center and victims, as well as of Hachiya's hospital; some assorted Japanese publications about Hiroshima with manuscript English captions or other annotations; and a scroll depicting the bombing, sent to Hachiya by his friend Shuka Takahashi in 1945.