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Collection

David Flournoy Papers, 1868-1879 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 volume; 2 manuscript pages.

Dr. David Flournoy's ledger from his work as a physician attending patients in Caroline Co., Va. Entries typically include the names of his patients (including an indication of whether they were African American) and their various charges accrued due to his treatments, visits, prescriptions, etc. Also includes 2 manuscript items: a letter and a receipt.

Collection includes a receipt and letter addressed to Flournoy from a Richmond farming partner. The third item, a ledger, contains regularly entered charges by name and date for visits to patients, prescriptions, and often short notes on diseases or treatments. Only 165 pages or the original 244 pages are extant. Flournoy's patients were of different races, and ranged from the Rev. J.D. Southall, ex-Confederate officers, and perhaps others of some prominence to sharecropppers. Complaints ranged from toothaches to venereal disease. There are also records of obstetrical and gynecological care. Also included in the ledger are about thirteen pages containing accounts of labor hired and goods purchased.

Collection
Collection comprises 9 pages of medical case notes for eight individuals, seven of whom required surgery. One case history is incomplete. There are men and women, adults and children, and black and white individuals among the patients. Appendicitis was the most common complaint, but there is mention of gangrene, bladder trouble, and Pott's disease. Case notes include name of patient, symptoms and past treatment, and details of the operation, although no mention of the success of the procedure is provided.

Collection comprises 9 pages of medical case notes for eight individuals, seven of whom required surgery. One case history is incomplete. There are men and women, adults and children, and black and white individuals among the patients. Appendicitis was the most common complaint, but there is mention of gangrene, bladder trouble, and Pott's disease. Case notes include name of patient, symptoms and past treatment, and details of the operation, although no mention of the success of the procedure is provided. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections.

Collection
Dr. Marmaduke M. Haworth was born 20 January 1823 in Guilford County, N.C., and died 23 March 1894 in Franklinville, Randolph County, N.C. He served the Franklinville area as a physician. He married Mary McMasters in 1852 and the couple had three children, Pandora, Viola, and Elizabeth. Collection comprises Haworth's medical diary and journal (approximately 156 pages), including his notes on treatment of physical ailments and on childbirth in the rural south before and after the Civil War. Haworth studied medicine at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia; he recorded the purchase of this notebook at Auner's bookstore to be used for his medical notes during 1846-1847. At the beginning he listed the titles and prices for the medical reference books he purchased. He then recorded 30 pages of remedies and cures, and provided a 4-page manuscript index to this material bound in at the back of the volume. He also included notes on course instruction (at one point mentioning the lectures of Nathaniel Chapman). The balance of the volume is, however, a record of over 750 obstetric deliveries that Haworth accomplished during his career, some with full case histories. The organization of the notebook is somewhat confused because Haworth stitched in pages with notes written longitudinally among the original medical course lecture notes he retained. The obstetric entries date from 1846-1894; there are two clippings inserted, one dated 1908.

Collection comprises Haworth's medical diary and journal (approximately 156 pages), including his notes on treatment of physical ailments and on childbirth in the rural south before and after the Civil War. Haworth studied medicine at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia; he recorded the purchase of this notebook at Auner's bookstore to be used for his medical notes during 1846-1847. At the beginning he listed the titles and prices for the medical reference books he purchased. He then recorded 30 pages of remedies and cures, and provided a 4-page manuscript index to this material bound in at the back of the volume. He also included notes on course instruction (at one point mentioning the lectures of Nathaniel Chapman). The balance of the volume is, however, a record of over 750 obstetric deliveries that Haworth accomplished during his career, some with full case histories. The organization of the notebook is somewhat confused because Haworth stitched in pages with notes written longitudinally among the original medical course lecture notes he retained. The obstetric entries date from 1846-1894; there are two clippings inserted, one dated 1908.

Collection

Sir Henry Thompson papers, 1851-1913 and undated 0.5 Linear Feet — approximately 90 letters

Collection of letters to and from Sir Henry Thompson (1820-1904), an English surgeon and a founder of the Cremation Society of England. Most letters in this collection are largely polite and perfunctory notes between Thompson and peers; some correspondents include his wife, the pianist Kate Loder; Empress Frederick of Germany; King George V of England; and King Leopold II of Belgium. The collection documents Thompson's social status and activities between the 1850s and early 1900s. It contains few details about his medical practice, aside from some materials advocating for the adoption of the practice of cremation. Some materials are addressed to members of his family, including son Herbert Thompson. Letters are numbered and itemized inventory is included with the materials.

Collection of letters to and from Sir Henry Thompson (1820-1904), a white English surgeon who was a founder of the Cremation Society of England. Most letters in this collection are largely polite and perfunctory notes between Thompson and peers; some correspondents include his wife, the pianist Kate Loder; King George of England; and King Leopold II. The collection documents Thompson's social status and activities between the 1850s and early 1900s. It contains few details about his medical practice or personal life, but indicates many high-profile and celebrity acquaintances and contains some autographs (for example, Henry James). Letters are numbered and an itemized inventory is included with the materials. There is also a detailed correspondents' list, transcriptions of some of the more information-heavy letters, and an appraisal of the letters, conducted for the Wisconsin Medical Society Foundation in 2003.

The original Trent Manuscripts Collection is foldered separately within the collection, and consists of the following items: ANS, a dinner invitation, and ALS, advocating the adoption of the practice of cremation. Items are accompanied by a bibliographic note describing Thompson's dinner parties.