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David Flournoy Papers, 1868-1879 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 volume; 2 manuscript pages.

Dr. David Flournoy's ledger from his work as a physician attending patients in Caroline Co., Va. Entries typically include the names of his patients (including an indication of whether they were African American) and their various charges accrued due to his treatments, visits, prescriptions, etc. Also includes 2 manuscript items: a letter and a receipt.

Collection includes a receipt and letter addressed to Flournoy from a Richmond farming partner. The third item, a ledger, contains regularly entered charges by name and date for visits to patients, prescriptions, and often short notes on diseases or treatments. Only 165 pages or the original 244 pages are extant. Flournoy's patients were of different races, and ranged from the Rev. J.D. Southall, ex-Confederate officers, and perhaps others of some prominence to sharecropppers. Complaints ranged from toothaches to venereal disease. There are also records of obstetrical and gynecological care. Also included in the ledger are about thirteen pages containing accounts of labor hired and goods purchased.

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Emma Simpson Glover Family papers, 1834-1953 2 Linear Feet — circa 410 Items

The papers consist of correspondence, legal and financial papers, photographs, account books, a memoir book, and miscellaneous papers and span the time period from 1834 to 1953. The bulk of the papers consists of correspondence between 1862 and 1914. This correspondence falls roughly into three major periods, each one consisting of two or three dozen letters.

The first period lasts until the 1890s and focuses on G. F. Simpson's involvement with the construction of a silver ore-crushing mill in Helena, Montana Territory, a venture shared with his brother, Charles H. Simpson; land investments in Kansas; and, after the 1860s, iron ore mining operations in Virginia. The letters from Montana and Kansas also document the harsh life on the American frontier. Included with this mostly business correspondence are a few letters from Thomas B. Sykes describing his experiences at Camp Chase, a Union prisoner-of-war camp near Columbus, Ohio, and as a resident of Aberdeen, Miss. during Reconstruction.

The second period, from the 1890s to 1910, consists chiefly of letters to Emma or her sisters Mary and Mabel, which discuss news of family and friends.

The last period, 1910-1914, consists mostly of correspondence between Emma and her husband Dr. Samuel R. Glover during their courtship and early marriage. Dr. Glover's letters include a limited discussion of his medical practice.

The legal papers include a will, mortgages, and land deeds. The financial papers include receipts and notes, some belonging to the firm of Simpson, Bass and Co. of Richmond, Va., operated by Charles H. Simpson and L. L. Bass, who were commission merchants in flour, grain, hay, and other provisions. The miscellaneous papers include clippings and printed material. There are photographs of Emma Simpson Glover, J. W. Simpson, and Mrs. Margaret Simpson.

The bound volumes consist of two ledgers and accounts, 1914-1921, of Dr. Glover's medical practice; ledger and accounts, 1877-1882, of a general store in Nelson Co., Va., which includes entries for farm and farm labor; and a memoir or scrap book of Mary Simpson, consisting of printed material, clippings, ribbons, and other memorabilia. The memoir book originally served as the cash book of an unknown Virginia firm for 1834-1836.

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Winn family papers, 1780-1925, bulk 1780-1889 5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes, 2,684 items, 27 vols.

Collection contains personal and business correspondence, papers, and volumes, mainly of John Winn (d. 1844), farmer, lawyer, and postmaster, and his son, Philip James Winn, physician and postmaster of Fluvanna Co., Va., and of the Winn (Wynn) family. The papers of the elder Winn relate to bounty claims of Revolutionary veterans, personal and business affairs, and include information about "Bremo," the plantation of Gen. John Hartwell Cocke. The papers of Philip James Winn relate to his education at the Virginia Military Institute and the University of Virginia, his career in medicine, the service of his brothers in the Confederate Army, and family activities, and include a description of the religious service of the Dunkards, records of the invention and patenting of a "new gate latch," and a letter of William H. Winn describing the battles of Bethel (1861) and Gettysburg (1863). More than half the collection consists of receipts and bills connected chiefly with John Winn's work in Revolutionary bounty lands and with Philip James Winn's invention. Twenty-seven volumes include post office accounts of John Winn and of his successor, Philip James Winn; a letter book concerning the "New Gate Latch"; accounts of the estate of Samuel Kidd; letter books; ledgers; medical notes; and records of births and deaths of slaves.

Family and business correspondence of John Winn (d. 1844); of his wife Lucy Winn; and of their numerous children, including Philip James Winn. The correspondence of John Winn, farmer, lawyer, postmaster at Winnsville, captain in the War of 1812, and agent for General John Hartwell Cocke, includes information on Bremo, the plantation of the latter, including also a list of periodicals subscribed to by Cocker and legal cases relative to Revolutionary bounty land.

Correspondence centering around Philip James Winn includes information on the Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, both of which he attended; one letter with a description of the unusual religious services of the Dunkards; a deed for land purchased by a free Negro; records of the invention and patenting of a 'New Gate Latch' by Philip J. Winn; and the interest of various members of the family in law, medicine, agriculture, mechanics, business, religion, and the operation of a stagecoach line between Richmond and Staunton, Virginia.

Collection also Includes a letter of William H. Winn containing detailed descriptions of the battles of Bethel, 1861, and Gettysburg, 1863, in which he participated as a Confederate soldier. More than half the collection consists of receipts and bills connected chiefly with John Winn's work in Revolutionary bounty lands and with Philip James Winn's invention. Twenty-seven volumes include post office accounts of John Winn and of his successor, Philip James Winn; a letter book concerning the 'New Gate Latch'; accounts of the estate of Samuel Kidd; letter books; ledgers; medical notes; and records of births and deaths of slaves.