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Reverend George Brinkmann Ehlhardt received his theological degree from Duke Divinity School in 1945. Reverend Ehlhardt was librarian of the Duke Divinity School Library from 1942 to 1950 and was later appointed president of Brevard College. This collection, collected mostly by George Ehlhardt, Duke Divinity School Librarian, includes ephemera and periodicals containing material by or about the American poet Robert Frost.

This collection, collected mostly by George Ehlhardt, Duke Divinity School Librarian, includes ephemera and periodicals containing material by or about the American poet Robert Frost. It is arranged in the order of the originally assigned Frost collection number found on the envelopes.

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James Applewhite papers, 1963-2010 13 Linear Feet — 9825 Items

James Applewhite is a poet and professor emeritus of English at Duke University. The collection is comprised of manuscripts, drafts, and proofs of poems, as well as notes, correspondence, clippings, and printed materials (including serials and anthologies). The collection documents Applewhite's work as a poet and professor of English at Duke University, including his research about Wordsworth. Manuscripts in the collection include Lessons in Soaring: Poems, A History of the River: Poems, and River Writing: An Eno Journal.
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James Howard Whitty papers, 1792-1943 and undated 19 Linear Feet — Approx. 12,275 Items

Journalist, businessman, Poe scholar and editor, and an avid collector of Poe memorabilia; resided in Richmond, Virginia. The James Howard Whitty papers include letters, drafts of books and articles, research notes, newspaper clippings, and other papers, all relating to Whitty's writings on Edgar Allan Poe's life and career, his editorship of Poe's poetry, and his relationship with other literary scholars. The numerous clippings are found both loose and mounted in three scrapbooks. There is also a manuscript volume containing a Richmond, Virginia book seller's accounts. Other research materials on Poe consist of transcripts of Poe's letters and over 600 images related to Poe's life. There is voluminous correspondence from Poe scholars and other literary critics, including George Woodberry, Mary E. Phillips, and Thomas O. Mabbott. Whitty's research papers also contain copies of letters from John C. Frémont to Joel Poinsett in 1838, research material and correspondence relating to Virginia planter and early Congressman John Randolph of Roanoke, and the history of Richmond, Virginia.

Papers of James Howard Whitty, author and authority on the life and work of Edgar Allan Poe, are chiefly comprised of correspondence, research writings and notes, printed material such as clippings and engravings, and copies of 19th century correspondence, all relating to Whitty's writings on literary figures and Virginia history.

Whitty's research materials on Edgar Allen Poe include copies of a large number of letters by Edgar Allan Poe and members of his family; documents concerning the events surrounding Poe's death; a large amount of correspondence with other Poe scholars, particularly George E. Woodberry, Mary E. Phillips, and Thomas Ollive Mabbott; and research notes made by Whitty, including material for a complete Poe bibliography, and rough drafts of Whitty's writings on Poe. There are also over 600 images, chiefly engravings, including portraits of Poe and his family, images of the places where Poe lived, and the museums and shrines dedicated to him. In addition, there are letters relating to Whitty's work as organizer and first president of the Edgar Allan Poe shrine in Richmond, Virginia, and to Whitty's quarrel with the directors of the shrine in 1924.

The hundreds of clippings included in this collection consist of what seems to be almost every article or mention of Poe from 1900-1935. Many of the articles are in duplicate and many of them contain notations by Whitty. There are also three scrapbooks of clippings.

Other materials center on Whitty's interest in the history of Richmond, Virginia; business correspondence pertaining to Whitty's work on the staff of the Richmond Times; notes on and copies of correspondence of John Randolph of Roanoke, 1814-1816 (Virginia planter and Congressman) to Ann Morris, in which he accuses her of being a common prostitute and the murderess of her child and of his brother. Copies of her answers to his accusations are also included. Whitty was interested in writing on John Randolph of Roanoke, but apparently never did so. Additional research materials include notes on and copies of letters from John Charles Frémont to Joel R. Poinsett, 1838; and other printed material, including reviews, copies of sections of books, publication notices, and advertisements. There is also a manuscript volume containing the accounts of a Richmond bookseller, 1929-1936.

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John Hall Wheelock collection, 1935-1979 1.5 Linear Feet — 640 Items

Poet and editor. The John Hall Wheelock collection forms the only substantial group of American literary authors' letters included in the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke. Hubbell was a longtime friend and admirer of Wheelock; the two corresponded for many years. When Hubbell donated his Wheelock materials to the Center, he suggested that associated collections be acquired, which initiated a decade-long effort to collect and preserve Wheelock's correspondence. Collectively the collections document, chiefly through correspondence, the developments in Wheelock's life and career. Belknap's papers reflect Wheelock's view of one of his cousins. Clemente's papers include a videotape of Wheelock reading his poetry. The Diana Chang, Michel Farano, Elwood Holstein, Leighton Rollins, and Carolyn Tyson materials suggest Wheelock's gratitude towards his admirers and support of younger poets; those of Elwood Holstein include Holstein's autobiographical sketch and account of his correspondence with Wheelock. Kenworthy's papers reflect not only her admiration of the poet and his response, they document Wheelock's increasing concern about his health. Stoddard's papers reflect her close friendship with Wheelock during his final years and their mutual encouragement. Most of the collections include Wheelock's handwritten copies and draft versions of his poems. Hubbell's admiration for Wheelock is suggested in letters from Hubbell to Vince Clemente and Elwood Holstein.

The John Hall Wheelock Collections are the only substantial group of American literary authors' letters included in Duke University's Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography. Duke Professor of American Literature Jay B. Hubbell was a longtime friend and admirer of John Hall Wheelock; the two corresponded for many years. When Hubbell donated his Wheelock materials to the Center, he suggested that the Center collect other Wheelock materials, a suggestion that initiated a decade-long effort to collect and preserve Wheelock's correspondence. The Duke University John Hall Wheelock Collection (1935-1979) consist of the following nine sub-collections: the Helen S. Belknap Papers, the Diana Chang Papers, the Vince Clemente Papers, the Michel Farano Papers, the Elwood Holstein Papers, the Marion E. Kenworthy Papers, the Leighton Rollins Papers, the Hope Stoddard Papers, and the Carolyn Tyson Papers.

Collectively the John Hall Wheelock Collection documents, chiefly through correspondence, the developments in the life and career of John Hall Wheelock (1886-1978) during the last twenty-five years of his life. The Helen S. Belknap Papers reflect Wheelock's view of one of his cousins. The Vince Clemente Papers include a videotape of Wheelock reading his poetry. The Diana Chang Papers, the Michel Farano Papers, the Elwood Holstein Papers, the Leighton Rollins Papers, and the Carolyn Tyson Papers suggest Wheelock's gratitude towards his admirers and his support of younger poets; the Elwood Holstein Papers also include Holstein's autobiographical sketch and his account of his correspondence with Wheelock. The Marion E. Kenworthy Papers reflect not only Kenworthy's admiration of Wheelock and Wheelock's response to her but also Wheelock's increasing concerns over his health. The Hope Stoddard Papers reflect the close friendship and mutual encouragement of Stoddard and Wheelock in his final years. Most of the John Hall Wheelock Collections include copies and versions of Wheelock's poems handwritten by Wheelock himself.

Jay B. Hubbell's admiration for John Hall Wheelock is suggested in letters from Hubbell about Wheelock which are included in the Vince Clemente Papers and the Elwood Holstein Papers. Collections in the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library related to the John Hall Wheelock Collections include the Jay Broadus Hubbell Papers; additional information may be found in the correspondence files of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

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Family of Irish origin living in Pennsylvania, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C. Family and business correspondence and invention papers of an Irish Catholic family living in Pennsylvania, Baltimore, Md., and Washington, D.C., whose members engaged in promoting inventions. The papers center on John Francis McMullen (1830-1900), and his wife, Lavelette (Johnson) McMullen. Includes letters from relatives in Ireland, from Virginia cousins and friends, from nuns of the Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary, from business acquaintances, from friends traveling in the U.S. and Europe, and from the novelist Mary Johnston; and papers relating to the settlement of a disputed legacy left to Mary McMullen by Miss Jane Agnes Riggs, the last of the children of George Washington Riggs, Washington banker. Also includes manuscripts of the Confederate poet, John Banister Tabb, writings of Dysart and Mary McMullen, letters and poems of William Hand Browne, editor, author, and librarian, and correspondence of Mary McMullen which gives glimpses of the Riggs family.

Family and business correspondence and invention papers of the McMullen family, spanning the years 1783-1969, with the majority of the material dating from about 1880-1945. Arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Legal Papers, Pictures, Financial Papers, Invention Papers, Miscellaneous, and Volumes.

The papers of John McMullen (1791-1870), inventor, consist of correspondence concerning family matters in Ireland; McMullen's efforts to assist relatives in gaining passage to the United States, the operation of his farm in Sinking Valley in Pennsylvania; a trip to England, 1850-1851, to sell his inventions; the invention of machines to knit stockings and fish nets; patents; the receipt of the Exhibitor's Medal for a machine shown at the Exhibition of the Works of All Nations at the Crystal Palace, London, England, in 1853 including a letter from President Millard Fillmore notifying him of the award; and an exhibition of a knitting machine at the New York Crystal Palace at the Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations in 1854.

The papers of John Francis McMullen (1830-1900), son of John McMullen, and of his wife, Lavalette (Johnston) McMullen (d. 1941), daughter of John Warfield Johnston, senator from Virginia, include correspondence while John Francis McMullen attended St. Mary's College, Baltimore, Maryland; letters from William Hand Browne (1828-1912), editor and librarian, describing his travels in the South during the early years of the Civil War; personal and family correspondence with friends and relatives, including letters from Senator Johnston containing references to his political activities; letters from the Sisters of the Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary concerning the education of the McMullen daughters at various schools run by the order; letters of Jean de Hedonville describing cattle ranching in Montana, life on the Crow Indian Reservation, and a camping trip to Yellowstone National Park; correspondence relating to the settlement of the estate of John Warfield Johnston; and business correspondence concerning his father's inventions and cattle raising.

Correspondence of the children of John Francis and Lavalette McMullen consists of letters of Mary McMullen, principally while a companion to Jane Agnes Riggs, daughter of George Washington Riggs, Washington banker, describing Riggs family history and their travels in Europe and the United States before World War I; letters to Mary from her cousin, novelist Mary Johnston (1870-1936); family letters of John Francis McMullen II (d. 1944), an engineer; letters of Benedict Dysart McMullen, writer, while serving with the American Red Cross in Europe during World War I; correspondence of Joseph Benjamin McMullen (d. 1965), inventor, concerning his many inventions, including aerial "drop" bombs during World War I, automobile accessories, kitchen utensils, household gadgets, and pressure and pull firing devices and collapsible vehicles during World War II; and papers relating to the settlement of a disputed legacy left Mary McMullen by Jane Riggs and correspondence concerning the sale of much of the inheritance. Also included are papers relating to the estates of the various members of the McMullen family; invention papers consisting of patents and descriptions of the work of John McMullen and Joseph B. McMullen; bills and receipts; lists of library books and Catholic publications purchased; manuscripts of William Hand Browne, John Bannister Tabb, Mary McMullen, and Dysart McMullen; and miscellaneous reports, certificates, and invitations from the many schools the McMullens attended.

Volumes consist of various business books of John McMullen and John Francis McMullen; subscription for the Catholic Church of Sinking Valley, 1830s; volumes of Joseph B. McMullen concerning his inventions; notebooks of writings and clippings of Mary McMullen and Dyeart McMullen; album of snapshots of their home, "Woodley," near Ellicott City, Maryland; and notebooks of Nicketti McMullen containing copies of old letters and data. There are also photographs of various members of the McMullen family and of homes at Wytheville, Thorn Springs, and Ellicott City.