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The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Ailecia Ruscin is a writer, activist, and scholar from San Antonio, Texas and Auburn, Alabama. She is the author or co-author of the zines provo-CAT-ive and alabama grrrl (published from 1997-2000).

The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Resident of Richmond, Va., socialist and grassroots political activist in his early life; founder of the Southern Electoral Reform League; later sided with conservatives such as Barry Goldwater and George Wallace. The David Gordon George Papers span the years 1919 to 1976, with the bulk of the collection dated between 1935 and 1965, and are organized into the Correspondence, Personal Files, Printed Materials and Writings, Photographic Materials, and Subject Files Series. The collection consists primarily of correspondence and files related to George's involvement in a variety of political and social movements, documenting his early involvement in grassroots socialist and leftist democratic organizing and electoral reform work, decades of involvement with national and regional labor organizations, and his late-life support of anti-communist and socially conservative politics, including segregationist platforms. His complex views on the political and social status of African Americans in the South, particularly in Virginia, are documented in his writings and correspondence. Among the organizations well-represented in the collection are the Southern Electoral Reform League, the Virginia Electoral Reform League, and the United States Information Service. The papers include correspondence with a wide spectrum of national political leaders, from Socialists (Norman Thomas and Victor Berger) to Democrats (Hubert Humphrey and Estes Kefauer) to Conservatives (George Wallace), as well as staff of diverse labor organizations and a number of Virginia politicians across a broad ideological spectrum. Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

The David Gordon George Papers span the years 1919 to 1976, with the bulk of the collection dated between 1935 and 1965, and are organized into the Correspondence, Personal Files, Printed Materials and Writings, Photographic Materials, and Subject Files Series. The collection consists primarily of correspondence and files related to George's involvement in a variety of political and social movements, documenting his early involvement in grassroots socialist and leftist democratic organizing and electoral reform work, decades of involvement with national and regional labor organizations, and his late-life support of anti-communist and socially conservative politics. His complex views on the political and social status of African Americans in the South, particularly in Virginia, are documented in his writings and correspondence. Among the organizations well-represented in the collection are the Southern Electoral Reform League, founded by George primarily to campaign against poll taxes, and the United States Information Service. The papers include files of correspondence with a wide spectrum of prominent national political leaders, from Socialists (Norman Thomas and Victor Berger) to Democrats (Hubert Humphrey and Estes Kefauer) to Conservatives (George Wallace), as well as staff of diverse labor organizations and a number of Virginia politicians across a broad ideological spectrum. There are also several files of correspondence relating to George's business ventures in Mexico, particularly his interests and operations in mining in the Chihuahua region.

George's writings, including many editorials and letters to the editor, and correspondence reveal his complex and shifting allegiances to various reform organizations during particularly eventful decades for the labor movement in the U.S. His work for labor-related causes in different guises put him in at least tacit opposition to positions he had advocated earlier. He also offers often contradictory views on race, supporting local black politicians at one point but joining the segregationist Citizens Council later in his life. In addition, George's experiences during the McCarthy Era demonstrate the lasting professional consequences of the alleged Communist ties in his past.

Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

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The Internationalist Books and Community Center Records include materials documenting the organization and operation of the organization, particularly through its Board of Directors; lists of members and volunteers who staffed or supported the bookstore; advertisements and flyers, often handmade, created by store staff for events, sales, and other activities; Internationalist newsletters and drafts; zines and other printed materials collected and distributed by the bookstore; clippings and media coverage about Bob Sheldon and the organization; and other miscellaneous materials. Many of the materials documenting the activities of the Board of Directors were created and collected by Kelly Wooten, a Board member in the early 2000s.

The Internationalist Books and Community Center Records include materials documenting the organization and operation of the organization, particularly through its Board of Directors; lists of members and volunteers who staffed or supported the bookstore; advertisements and flyers, often handmade, created by store staff for events, sales, and other activities; Internationalist newsletters and drafts; zines and other printed materials collected and distributed by the bookstore; clippings and media coverage about Bob Sheldon and the organization; and other miscellaneous materials. Many of the materials documenting the activities of the Board of Directors were created and collected by Kelly Wooten, a Board member in the early 2000s.

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Mab Segrest papers, 1889-2014 66.6 Linear Feet — 119 boxes

Dr. Mab Segrest is a feminist writer, scholar, and activist who received her PhD from Duke University in 1979. She was born in 1949 in Tuskegee, Alabama and attended Huntingdon College from 1967 to 1971. Multiple generations of Dr. Segrest's family have lived in the Tuskegee area and influenced its history and development. Segrest is recognized for speaking and writing about sexism, racism, homophobia, classism, and other forms of oppression. She has founded, served on the boards of, and consulted with a wide range of social justice organizations throughout her life. From its creation in 1969 until it disbanded in 1983, Segrest participated in the southern feminist writing collective Feminary working to produce the journal of the same name. After Feminary disbanded, she worked for six years (1983–1990) with North Carolinians Against Racist and Religious Violence (NCARRV), focusing much of her work on removing the Ku Klux Klan from North Carolina. She earned her livelihood from 1992–2000 as Coordinator of the Urban-Rural Mission (USA), part of the URM network of the World Council of Churches. After working full-time with various political organizations, Segrest returned to academia. From 2002 until 2014, Segrest worked at Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut. In 2004, Segrest was appointed the Fuller-Matthai Professor of Gender & Women's Studies there. She is currently conducting research for a book or series of books about the Central State Hospital in Milledgeville, Georgia. Her major published works include: Living in a House I Do Not Own (Night Heron Press, 1982), My Mama's Dead Squirrel: Lesbian Essays on Southern Culture, (Firebrand Books, 1985), Memoir of a Race Traitor (South End Press, 1994), and Born to Belonging: Writings on Spirit and Justice (Rutgers University Press, 2002).

This collection documents Segrest's personal life, education, and professional life and is comprised of materials related to her family, activism, research, writings, teaching, and travel.

The collection also contains a typescript of Dorothy Allison's Bastard out of Carolina.

There are significant materials relating to Segrest's work with the following organizations: The NC Coalition for Gay and Lesbian Equality, North Carolinians Against Racist and Religious Violence (NCARRV), The Center for Democratic Renewal (CDR), The North Carolina Coalition for Gay and Lesbian Equality (NCCGLE), National Women's Studies Association (NWSA), The World Council of Churches/Urban Rural Mission (WCC/URM), and The National Women's Studies Association/Southern Women's Studies Association (NWSA/SWSA).

Where possible, Segrest's original folder titles have been retained.