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Collection
Global Rights is an international human rights advocacy organization headquartered in Washington D.C. The Global Rights Records span the dates 1980-2006 and consist of correspondence, administrative, research and project files, and printed material related to the work of Global Rights (known before 2003 as the International Human Rights Law Group - IHRLG), a human rights advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. Material in this collection documents human rights abuses in various contexts while also providing insight into the complex administrative issues facing nongovernmental organizations working to curb those violations. The collection is divided into series for Administrative Files, Country Files, Printed Material, and Project Files. The Administrative Files Series contains records of meetings of the board of directors of Global Rights, executive correspondence, and training material for human rights advocates. Material in the Country Files Series documents Global Right's activities in specific countries, generally concentrated in Africa, East Asia, and Latin America. Files on human rights and social conditions in Afghanistan, Bosnia and Hercegovina, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Zaire are among the most extensive in the series but other countries are also represented. The Printed Material Series chiefly consists of articles and speeches by IHRLG/Global Rights staff, and reports by the IHRLG on human rights in many countries. Various issue-based advocacy efforts chronicled in the Project Files Series complete the collection. Activities documented in this series include increasing legal infrastructure in Cambodia through the Cambodian Defenders Project; advocating for women's rights (economic and sexual) and targeting sexual slavery and human trafficking; and targeting racial discrimination in the U.S. and abroad. An extensive set of project files relates to advocacy for the ratification of human rights treaties, and documents several international meetings such as UN's Meeting of the States Parties to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the Meeting of the States Parties to the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (1980).

The Global Rights Records span the dates 1980-2006 and consist of correspondence, administrative, research and project files, and printed material related to the work of Global Rights (known before 2003 as the International Human Rights Law Group (IHRLG)), a human rights advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. Material in this collection documents human rights abuses in various contexts while also providing insight into the complex administrative issues facing nongovernmental organizations working to curb those violations. The collection is divided into series for Administrative Files, Country Files, Printed Material, and Project Files. The Aministrative Files Series contains records of meetings of the board of directors of Global Rights, executive correspondence, and training material for human rights advocates. Material in the Country Files Series documents the group's activities in specific countries, generally concentrated in Africa, East Asia, and Latin America. Files on Afghanistan, Bosnia and Hercegovina, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Zaire are among the most extensive in the collection. The Printed Material Series chiefly consists of articles and speeches by IHRLG/Global Rights staff and reports by the IHRLG on human rights in many countries. Various issue-based advocacy efforts chronicled in the Project Files Series complete the collection. Activities documented in this series include increasing legal infrastructure in Cambodia through the Cambodian Defenders Project; advocating for women's rights (economic and sexual) and targeting sexual slavery and human trafficking; and targeting racial discrimination in the U.S. and abroad. An extensive set of project files relates to advocacy for the ratification of human rights treaties, and documents several international meetings such as UN's Meeting of the States Parties to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the Meeting of the States Parties to the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (1980).

Collection
Collection includes advertisements, games, sheet music, serial illustrations, and other caricatures of African Americans predominately dating from the late 1800s through the mid-1900s.

Collection includes advertisements, games, sheet music, serial illustrations, and other caricatures of African Americans predominately dating from the late 1800s through the mid-1900s. A significant portion of the illustrations were excerpted from news or literature magazines such as Harper's Weekly, Frank Leslie's Popular Magazine, and Puck magazine. The collection also includes advertisements from companies, including Aunt Jemima and Cream of Wheat, which appeared in women's magazines such as Modern Priscilla and Needlecraft. Many items depict African Americans in rural or Southern settings. Of note in the collection are a set of shackles, which have no known provenance or date, but which appear to have been intended for slaves (or could be a reproduction from a later time period).

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection

Thomas Dixon Jr. Papers, 1880s-1959 3.0 Linear Feet — 4 gray hollinger boxes, 1 oversize folder, and 1 separately boxed volume.

Thomas Dixon Jr. (1864-1946) was a white supremacist, novelist, playwright, and clergyman, originally from North Carolina. Dixon authored The Leopard's Spots (1902) and The Clansman (1905), which later was adapted into D. W. Griffith's film The Birth of a Nation (1915). This collection contains literary drafts of his plays and novels, some correspondence, and other legal materials and photographs.

Collection contains literary manuscript drafts, correspondence, family photographs, and printed materials and clippings. The bulk of the collection consists of Dixon's holograph and typescript drafts of scripts, novels, and corrections for titles he authored including The Clansman, The Birth of a Nation (includes draft play script and film's shot list), The One Woman (bound page proof), the Love Complex, God's Fool: A Drama of Negro Life in Modern Harlem, Shanghai Express, The Great American, The Man in Gray, A Man of the People: A Drama of Abraham Lincoln, The Sins of the Father (2 bound volumes, holograph drafts), The Sun Virgin (bound volume, holograph draft), and The Flaming Sword. The bulk of these works depict romanticized, racist, Lost Cause morality plays, with Dixon's texts advocating white supremacy, segregation, violence against Black people, misogyny (and opposing women's suffrage), and miscengeny. There are also some drafts by other writers, including Majorie Chase, W. Ward Marsh, and Ernest De Journo. Correspondence and legal papers in this collection tend to relate to his publications, including contracts and copyrights; includes a letter from Jerome Dowd reflecting on the Tulsa Race Riot. There are also some legal proceedings from a 1920s court case between Dixon (defendent) and the National Drama Corporation, and some letters discussing Dixon's poor health. The collection includes some materials relating to Dixon's involvement with the Mount Mitchell Association, a land development company in Western North Carolina; materials on spirituality from Dixon's widow, Madelyn Donovan Dixon; family photographs and portraits of Dixon, his first wife (Harriet Dixon), his second wife (Madelyn Donovan Dixon), and some of his children and other relatives, at times unidentified; and assorted printed materials, flyers, notes, and unidentified drafts.