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Joseph F. Mattice papers, 1929-1985 1.5 Linear Feet

The Joseph F. Mattice Papers include correspondence, photographs, newspaper clippings, photographs and ephemera pertaining to the life and professional career of Joseph F. Mattice. The bulk of the collection consists of material from his political career as mayor of Asbury Park, specifically concerning the Asbury Park riots of July 1970.

The Joseph F. Mattice Papers include correspondence, newspaper clippings, photographs, and ephemera ranging from 1929-1985. The material is organized into six series: Asbury Park New Jersey Riots July 1970, Correspondence, Photographs, Ephemera, Newspaper Clippings, and Audiovisual materials. There is also one oversize folder consisting of a political flyer and two magazines. Mattice acquired the materials during his career as a student at Georgetown University, lawyer, city council member, district court judge, and Monmouth County board of elections member. Mattice was mayor of Asbury Park during the July 1970 riots. The riots lasted from July 4-10, 1970. They began in reaction to the African American community’s frustration with employment discrimination and the poor living conditions in the predominately African American West side neighborhood. The riots caused significant damage to the West Side, 167 people were arrested, and local and State police were summoned. In the end, city government and West Side residents worked together to come to a resolution. The Asbury Park July 1970 riots brought national attention to the town, which is documented via the received correspondence, clippings, and ephemera in the collection.

The later correspondence consists of personal letters and papers coupled with newspaper clippings pertaining to politics in Asbury Park and Monmouth County as a whole.

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Wendel White photographs, 2009-2019 4.0 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — 75 photographic prints — 24x30 and 24x42 inches

Wendel White is a photographer and Distinguished Professor of Art at Stockton University in New Jersey. This photograph collection comprises two bodies of work by White that explore aspects of African American history through artifacts, archives, and 21st century landscapes. The first, "Manifest," comprises 45 24x30 inch color inkjet photographs of single objects relating to African American material culture and history, taken by White in various public and private collections throughout the U.S. Subjects in these stark images include a diary, printed notices, slavery narratives, a lock of Frederick Douglass's hair, a drum, a slave collar, a tobacco pouch, a tintype photograph, and other objects. "Manifest" is the 2015 winner of the Archive of Documentary Arts Collection Award for Documentarians of Color. The second portfolio, "Red Summer," refers to race-related violence against African Americans that took place from 1912 to 1923, with the majority occurring during the summer of 1919. It consists of 30 24x42 inch color photographs, taken by White from 2017 to 2018, at sites across the United States where violence against African Americans - assaults, riots, and lynchings - took place, paired with contemporaneous newspaper accounts of the events. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Wendel White photographs collection consists of two bodies of work that explore aspects of African American history through images of artifacts, historical printed pieces and manuscripts, and 21st century landscapes.

The first, "Manifest," comprises 45 24x30 inch color inkjet photographs of single objects relating to African American material culture and history, taken by White in various public and private collections throughout the U.S. Subjects in these stark images include a diary, printed notices, slavery narratives, a lock of Frederick Douglass's hair, a drum, a slave collar, a tobacco pouch, a tintype photograph, and other objects. "Manifest" is the 2015 winner of the Archive of Documentary Arts Collection Award for Documentarians of Color.

The second portfolio, "Red Summer," refers to race-related violence against African Americans that took place from 1912 to 1923, with the majority occurring during the summer of 1919. It consists of 30 24x42 inch color photographs, taken from 2017 to 2018, of the sites across the United States where violence against African Americans - assaults, riots, lynchings - took place, paired with contemporaneous newspaper accounts of the events.

The photographer notes: "Several projects that have occupied my attention during the past two decades are, in retrospect, part of a broader effort to seek out the ghosts that continue to haunt the remnants of the past." The full artist's statements on "Manifest" and "Red Summer" are included in the series descriptions for those projects.

A photobook based on the "Manifest" project was published in 2014 by Chroma (California Institute of Integral Studies) as Manifest. Images from both projects have been exhibited in institutions across the U.S.