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Collection
Eckard Toy was an American history professor and scholar who studied the history of race, the Ku Klux Klan, and neo-Nazis in the United States, particularly in the Pacific Northwest. Collection includes Toy's research files and related materials on various extremist groups in the United States, particularly right-wing Christian extremists, the Ku Klux Klan, and Holocaust revisionists. Files are arranged by group or topic and at times include Toy's correspondence with various representatives. Notable groups include the Church of Jesus Christ Christian, various factions of the Ku Klux Klan, the German American National Political Action Committee (GANPAC), the Institute for Historical Review, and Christian Biblical America. Collection also contains Toy's research on Francis Yockey and Gordon Kahl. Materials from the IHR include two VHS tapes and one audiocassette on Holocaust revisionism.

Collection includes Toy's research files and related materials on various extremist groups in the United States, particularly right-wing Christian extremists, the Ku Klux Klan, and Holocaust revisionists. Files are arranged by group or topic and at times include Toy's correspondence with various representatives. Predominant groups include the Church of Jesus Christ Christian, various factions of the Ku Klux Klan, the German American National Political Action Committee (GANPAC), the Institute for Historical Review (IHR), and Christian Biblical America. Collection also contains Toy's research on Francis Yockey and Gordon Kahl. Materials from the IHR include two VHS tapes and one audiocassette on Holocaust revisionism. Most folders were originally grouped with their titles assigned by Toy.

Collection
J. Claude Evans was a United Methodist minister who served in South Carolina, Texas, and North Carolina along with his wife, Maxilla. He edited the South Carolina Methodist Advocate from 1952 to 1957, and was chaplain at Southern Methodist University in Dallas from 1957 until his retirement from the ministry in 1982. The majority of the family's papers relate to the pastoral and counseling career of J. Claude Evans, and include drafts and copies of his sermons, articles, columns, and other writings from the 1940s through the early 2000s on wide-ranging topics such as Christianity, spirituality, abortion, race, sexuality, sexism, nature, equality, aging, and violence. The papers also include some personal materials, correspondence, genealogy, notes and printed materials from his many professional activities, and Evans' subject files. There is a small amount of material created and collected by Maxilla, J. Claude's wife, largely relating to her bird watching and breeding of songbirds in Texas and North Carolina.

This collection has been arranged into nine series, most of which reflect the life and work of J. Claude Evans. One series, the Maxilla Evans Materials series, relates exclusively to Maxilla Evans' interests in birding, bird breeding, and horticulture, and also includes some of her writings, correspondence, family history, and other collected materials.

One of the largest series relating to J. Claude Evans is the Sermons series, with sermons arranged alphabetically by title. Files in this series reflect Evans' own arrangement of his papers, which typically include sermon copies with annotations punctuating his delivery and emphasis, notes and research about the subject, lists of when the sermon was preached and at which church, and occasionally bulletins from various services. Sermon topics varied widely, with many fairly liberal sermons on controversial issues like women's rights, abortion, racism, drugs, communism, atheism, and homosexuality.

Another large component of the collection is the Subject Files series, collected by Evans to support his research and writings both as a pastor and a columnist. This series includes many clippings, notes, and other materials curated by Evans, and is also arranged alphabetically by subject.

Evans' Correspondence is arranged into alphabetical and thematic sub-series. Most of the correspondence is sorted alphabetically by correspondent, unless Evans purposefully collected and grouped a batch of letters together under another heading; usually these are letters he received in reaction to an article or sermon on controversial issues like race, abortion, and so on. Evans also separated letters between him and Maxilla during World War II and his other travels. These headings are listed beneath the alphabetical correspondence files.

Evans' Personal Files relate to largely non-pastoral or counseling topics, including his childhood, marriage and family, military life, family history and photographs, and scrapbooks. The Pastoral Activities series includes Evans' materials from various churches and community organizations such as the Intentional Growth Center, as well as counseling and theology professional memberships. This series also includes a small amount of audiocassettes recording Evans' devotionals, seminar workshops, and other speaking engagements. Finally, the Courses and Notes series contains most of Evans' handwritten notes from the many seminars, workshops, and classes he both took and taught during his long career as a pastor and counselor.

Evans' prolific Writings began while he was a student in the 1930s and continued until he retired from writing columns for the Waynesville Mountaineer in 2000. The series is arranged into Published Articles, Drafts, and Prayers. Within the Drafts are Evans' multiple working copies of his Mountaineer columns, arranged alphabetically by title. (Copies of the published versions are filed chronologically under Published Articles.) Additional reactions to Evans' writings can also be found in the Correspondence series. The Prayers are unsorted, except for a batch of prayer cards organized by subject, kept by Evans during his chaplaincy at SMU.

The Printed Materials series contains texts both written, edited, and collected by Evans, including college yearbooks, bound copies of the Methodist Advocate dating from his tenure as editor, and other books that reference Evans and his work as an abortion counselor.

Collection

Joshua Rashaad McFadden photographs, 2015-2016 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 20 prints — 20 color photographic prints

Collection consists of 20 13x19 inch color inkjet photographic collages featuring portraits of young African American men, taken by McFadden, paired with reproduction color portraits of their fathers when they were younger, and a handwritten personal narrative by each youth about what it means to be an African American man in the 21st century. There is also a print with McFadden and his father. Many of the fathers appear in military uniforms. Topics expressed in the personal narratives include stereotypes as well as new definitions of black masculinity; the construction of and attitudes towards race, gender, and sexuality; generational issues; and relationships with fathers. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 20 13x19 inch color inkjet photographic collages featuring portraits of young African American men, taken by McFadden, paired with reproduction color portraits of their fathers when they were younger, and handwritten personal narratives, one to three paragraphs long, by each youth about what it means to be an African American man in the 21st century. One print is of McFadden and his father, and includes a reproduction of his father's Selective Service card.

Topics expressed in the personal narratives include stereotypes as well as new definitions of black masculinity; the construction of and attitudes of others as well as themselves towards race, gender, and sexuality; generational issues; and relationships with fathers. Many of the fathers served in the Armed Forces, and appear in their portraits in military uniforms.

From the artist's statement: "How does one begin to challenge the misguided perceptions that decrease the quality of living for young African American men? Furthermore, how does the African American man position himself in a society that does not acknowledge his true identity? African American men and stories of their intersecting identities unrecognized in forums that allow these positive images to become a part of the dominant narrative of African American men. As a photographic artist, I chose to use contemporary portraiture, the vernacular image, qualitative data, and positioning to expose this narrative with Come to Selfhood."

"Come to Selfhood explores African American male identity, masculinity, notions about the father figure, and the photographic archive by providing a frame of reference that visually articulates the diverse identities of young Black men. By delving into ideas of history, role models, and varied experiences, Come to Selfhood makes the previously invisible Black man, accurately and meaningfully visible."

For this body of work, McFadden received the 2017 Duke University Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Documentarians of Color.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection
Twentieth-century secret fraternal group held to confine its membership to American-born white Protestant Christians. Collection includes a broad range of Ku Klux Klan pamphlets, flyers, and other ephemera regarding Klan membership, Anglo-American values, protests against African Americans, Communists, or non-Protestant people, and promotional Klan events. Early material highlights activities of the Women of the Klan in Pennsylvania during the 1920s, including their charity work and fundraising for the Klan Haven, an orphanage. This material also includes large panoramic photographs of 1920s Klan reunions. Later materials from the 1960s are largely from the Southeast and mid-Atlantic States, and include literature, flyers, and handouts on Klan history, segregation, school integration, Communism, Catholicism, and Judaism.

Collection includes printed materials, apologetics, membership solicitations, circulars, brochures, pamphlets, broadsides, periodicals, cards, ephemera, and realia. Items were produced and distributed by various chapters of the Ku Klux Klan, dispersed throughout the United States, but largely originating in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic region. The KKK Collection also includes several panoramic photographs, assorted issues of Klan and other hate-group serial titles, and audio materials.

Materials have been acquired from a variety of sources and over several decades. Most of the collection has been arranged according to the geographic origin of the materials. Different branches and factions of the Klan are represented, including the United Klans of America, Women of the Ku Klux Klan, the Invisible Empire of the KKK, the Mississippi Green Knights, and the Mississippi White Knights.

Notable items include: a petition for the incorporation of a Klan chapter in Fulton Co., Georgia, in 1916; panoramic photographs and a wallet with Klan membership cards from Charles D. Johnson, a Florida Klansman in the 1930s; 1920s order forms for Klan robes, fiery crosses, and other Klan administrative materials from the Women of the Klan; pamphlets, circulars, and other literature opposing the Civil Rights movement, desegregation, and school integration, collected in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana in the 1960s; and recruitment flyers for rallies in Maryland, Ohio, and Pennsylvania during the 1980s.

Other items were first distributed during a talk by C. P. Ellis to freshmen students at a Duke University dormitory in 1969. Items include a 45-rpm sound disc with the songs "Flight NAACP 105" and "High ride"; a flyer regarding protests against the playing of the song "Dixie" at student events; a membership form for the North Carolina chapter; and printed items, including God is the Author of Segregation (1967) and issues of The Fiery Cross.

Collection
Minnie Bruce Pratt was born in Selma, Alabama in 1946 and raised in nearby Centreville. She received a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa and a doctorate in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. An award-winning poet, Pratt has published collections of both poetry and essays. Pratt began teaching and grass roots organizing in North Carolina in the 1970s, and has continued her work as a professor and activist through 2008, the time of this writing. Pratt frequently makes speaking appearances at conferences and universities across the United States. Pratt has two sons, Ransom Weaver and Ben Weaver, from her marriage (1966-1975). As of 2008, Pratt resides with longtime partner, transgender activist and author Leslie Feinberg. The collection dates primarily between 1975 and 2005 and focuses on women's studies, sexual and gender identity, sexuality, and Pratt's fight against racism, sexism, imperialism and other forms of intolerance. A Writing Series comprises drafts, proofs, and galleys related to Pratt's major works through 2003, as well as materials related to shorter pieces by Pratt, reviews, print interviews, materials related to Pratt's editorial work, and personal journals. The series also contains materials pertaining to the outside funding from grants and speaking appearances that Pratt obtained to support herself as a writer. Major works represented are Pratt's poetry and essay collections The Sound of One Fork, We Say We Love Each Other, Crime Against Nature, Rebellion: Essays 1980-1991, S/HE, Walking Back Up Depot Street, and The Dirt She Ate. Other series in the collection are Correspondence; Family, consisting of early correspondence, mementos, photographs, and genealogical information; Activism, files of newspaper clippings, fliers, and correspondence related to Pratt's grass roots organizing; Teaching, Financial, Photographs, Audiovisual Material, Printed Material, and Ephemera. Notable correspondents include Mumia Abu-Jamal, Dorothy Allison, Judith Arcana, Elly Bulkin, Chrystos, Holly Hughes, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Mab Segrest.

The Minnie Bruce Pratt Papers contain materials dating from the 1870s to 2005, with the bulk of the collection dating between 1975 and 2005. Materials in the collection document Pratt's work as a teacher, poet, writer, and activist. Specifically, the collection focuses on women's studies, sexual and gender identity, sexuality, and Pratt's fight against racism, sexism, imperialism and other forms of intolerance. The collection is organized into ten series: Writing, Correspondence, Family, Activism, Teaching, Financial, Photographs, Audiovisual Material, Printed Material, and Ephemera.

The Writing Series comprises drafts, proofs, and galleys related to Pratt's major works through 2003, as well as materials related to shorter pieces by Pratt, reviews, print interviews, materials related to Pratt's editorial work, and personal journals. The series also contains materials pertaining to the outside funding from grants and speaking appearances that Pratt obtained to support herself as a writer. Subseries include: Journals, The Sound of One Fork, We Say We Love Each Other, Crime Against Nature, Rebellion: Essays 1980-1991, S/HE, Walking Back Up Depot Street, The Dirt She Ate, Feminary, Workers World, Other Writings, Grant Applications, Interviews, Gigs, and Manuscripts by Others.

The Correspondence Series contains correspondence Pratt sent and received after 1966, the year of her marriage. Subseries include: Personal Correspondence, Literary Correspondence, and General Correspondence. Notable correspondents include Dorothy Allison, Judith Arcana, Elly Bulkin, Chrystos, Holly Hughes, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Mab Segrest.

The Family Series contains materials related to Pratt's childhood and relatives, including legal and business papers, genealogical information, correspondence, mementos, and photographs. The bulk of the material dates to the twentieth century, but a few documents and several photographs date to the nineteenth century. Subseries include Brown-Carr Family, Pratt Family, Minnie Bruce Pratt, Ransom Weaver and Ben Weaver, and Leslie Feinberg.

The Activism Series documents Pratt's work as an activist supporting diversity and fighting intolerance. The series comprises newspaper clippings, fliers, correspondence, and logisitical arrangements pertaining to Pratt's organizing, conference attendances, and personal research. Subseries include: Anti-Ku Klux Klan, Fayetteville, National Endowment for the Arts, and Other Issues.

The Teaching Series documents Pratt's work as an educator at various universities, primarily The Union Institute and Hamilton College. The series comprises course syllabi, materials to supplement teaching, seminar evaluations, contracts, general faculty documents, catalogs, newspaper clippings, and correspondence. The series contains correspondence from Mumia Abu-Jamal during his application process to The Union Institute for graduate studies.

The Financial Series consists of tax returns for the years 1981 to 2004 as well as detailed narratives carefully documenting deductions taken by Pratt related to her writing and teaching career.

The Photographs Series contains photographs documenting events and individuals in Minnie Bruce Pratt's life, with descriptions provided by the donor.

The Audiovisual Material Series contains miscellaneous audiovisual material pertaining to Pratt's speaking engagements, interests, and personal life. The series includes speeches and readings given at gigs, interviews, audio correspondence, programs related to lesbian issues, and instructional materials. Materials are organized into subseries depending on format and include Audio Cassettes, Compact Discs, and Videos. Use copies will need to be created before items can be accessed by researchers. Additionally, interviews are restricted unless permission from the interviewee is obtained.

The Printed Material Series contains periodicals, booklets, printed essays, and chapbooks arranged alphabetically by title. Subjects represented include poetry, women's studies, feminism, lesbianism, and the Ku Klux Klan. A number of periodicals were removed from this collection and added to the Women's and LGBT Movements Periodicals Collection. Minnie Bruce Pratt's personal library comprising several hundred books including her own work and anthologies containing her work have been cataloged separately.

The Ephemera Series comprises miscellaneous items collected by Pratt and chiefly contains t-shirts, buttons, and posters related to Pratt's activism, the conferences and demonstrations she attended, and Feminary. Posters also document Pratt's book relases, speaking appearances, seminars, and courses. Additional items include candlesticks given to Pratt upon her marriage to Marvin Weaver, a birthday coffee mug from Leslie Feinberg, pens with printed logos, a stamp, and a vibrator, and pair of handcuffs given to Pratt by students from Iowa.

Collection
Roy C. Trimiar was an African-American U.S. Army veteran, who served as a private in the Q.M. Det. SC-CASC, Colored, and the Ser. Det. SC-4th, Colored, 1942-1943. He was born in Homer, Georgia and lived much of his life in Cooleemee, North Carolina. He was married to Lola Wood Trimiar (1909-1996). Collection primarily includes letters from Trimiar to his wife in Cooleemee and Mocksville, NC (89 items). The letters begin with their courtship (1939) in Cooleemee, but mainly date from Trimiar's service in the U.S. Army Colored Troops stationed at Fort Bragg, N.C., and Fort Oglethorpe, Ga.

Collection primarily includes letters from Trimiar to his wife, Lola Wood Trimiar, in Cooleemee and Mocksville, NC (89 items). The letters begin with their courtship (1939) in Cooleemee, but mainly date from Trimiar's service in the U.S. Army Colored Troops stationed at Fort Bragg, N.C., and Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. Topics include army life; his jobs; Sunday services; trips to town; concerns about money and (apparently late) payment of wages; opinions of the Japanese; hopes for a discharge because of his age; and strategies to avoid racism. The letters also demonstrate his concern for his wife and their home, including support for her social activities and worry over tight finances, food rationing, and her safety. Includes letters to Trimiar from Lola (17 items) and other friends, receipts, business correspondence, and his draft letter. Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

Collection

Shawn Michael Pridgen photographs, 2020 1 Linear Foot — 1 box — 15 photographic prints — 11x14 and 16x20 inches

Shawn Pridgen is a documentary photographer based in Brooklyn, New York whose photographic career began with the Black Lives Matter protests, which followed the violent deaths of African American citizens at the hands of law enforcement. In 2020 he received the Collection Award from the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University for this portfolio. Collection consists of fifteen photographic prints of images taken in 2020 at Black Lives Matter protests and rallies in New York City and Washington, D.C. by documentarian Shawn Michael Pridgen. Subjects include portraits of protesters, in some cases with Washington, D.C. monuments in the background; and images of police, crowds, marches, protest signs, city streets and other urban features. The black-and-white prints measure 11x14 inches (9) and 16x20 inches (6). Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of fifteen images from the Black Lives Matter protests and rallies in New York City and Washington, D.C. photographed by documentarian Shawn Michael Pridgen in 2020. Subjects include portraits of protesters, in some cases with Washington, D.C. monuments in the background; and images of police, crowds, marches, protest signs, city streets and other urban features. The black-and-white prints measure 11x14 inches (9) and 16x20 inches (6). Each print is titled, dated, and signed on the back. For this portfolio documenting the Black Lives Matter movement, Pridgen received the Archive of Documentary Arts Collections Award.

Collection
Online
The SPLC Intelligence Project Collection includes printed materials, serials, organizational literature, pamphlets, clippings, catalogs, fliers, and correspondence from a variety of groups monitored by the SPLC and its contacts between the 1980s and 2010. Included within the collection are many groups falling within the SPLC Klanwatch and Militia Watch projects. Organizations represented in this collection typically promoted anti-semitic, white supremacist, racist, separatist, or anti-Communist views and policies. Other organizations promoted Second Amendment rights, right-wing Christian and American nationalism, Y2K and survivalist preparations, and the rise of the Confederacy. SPLC's interests expanded across the political spectrum to include both right-wing and left-wing extremist literature.

The SPLC Intelligence Project Collection includes printed materials, serials, organizational literature, pamphlets, clippings, catalogs, fliers, and correspondence from a variety of groups monitored by the SPLC and its contacts between the 1980s and 2010. Included within the collection are many groups falling within the SPLC Klanwatch and Militia Watch projects. Organizations represented in this collection typically promoted anti-Semitic, white supremacist, racist, separatist, or anti-Communist views and politics. Other organizations promoted Second Amendment rights, right-wing Christian and American nationalism, Y2K and survivalist preparations, and the rise of the Confederacy. SPLC's interests expanded across the political spectrum to include both right-wing and left-wing extremist literature.

The manuscript portion of the collection includes 11.0 lin. ft. of materials; the remainder of the collection, consisting of serials collected by SPLC from various organizations, has been separated for individual cataloging.

Check the library catalog link for a list of separated serial titles: Separately cataloged serials

Collection
Collection includes advertisements, games, sheet music, serial illustrations, and other caricatures of African Americans predominately dating from the late 1800s through the mid-1900s.

Collection includes advertisements, games, sheet music, serial illustrations, and other caricatures of African Americans predominately dating from the late 1800s through the mid-1900s. A significant portion of the illustrations were excerpted from news or literature magazines such as Harper's Weekly, Frank Leslie's Popular Magazine, and Puck magazine. The collection also includes advertisements from companies, including Aunt Jemima and Cream of Wheat, which appeared in women's magazines such as Modern Priscilla and Needlecraft. Many items depict African Americans in rural or Southern settings. Of note in the collection are a set of shackles, which have no known provenance or date, but which appear to have been intended for slaves (or could be a reproduction from a later time period).

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection

Thomas Dixon Jr. Papers, 1880s-1959 3.0 Linear Feet — 4 gray hollinger boxes, 1 oversize folder, and 1 separately boxed volume.

Thomas Dixon Jr. (1864-1946) was a white supremacist, novelist, playwright, and clergyman, originally from North Carolina. Dixon authored The Leopard's Spots (1902) and The Clansman (1905), which later was adapted into D. W. Griffith's film The Birth of a Nation (1915). This collection contains literary drafts of his plays and novels, some correspondence, and other legal materials and photographs.

Collection contains literary manuscript drafts, correspondence, family photographs, and printed materials and clippings. The bulk of the collection consists of Dixon's holograph and typescript drafts of scripts, novels, and corrections for titles he authored including The Clansman, The Birth of a Nation (includes draft play script and film's shot list), The One Woman (bound page proof), the Love Complex, God's Fool: A Drama of Negro Life in Modern Harlem, Shanghai Express, The Great American, The Man in Gray, A Man of the People: A Drama of Abraham Lincoln, The Sins of the Father (2 bound volumes, holograph drafts), The Sun Virgin (bound volume, holograph draft), and The Flaming Sword. The bulk of these works depict romanticized, racist, Lost Cause morality plays, with Dixon's texts advocating white supremacy, segregation, violence against Black people, misogyny (and opposing women's suffrage), and miscengeny. There are also some drafts by other writers, including Majorie Chase, W. Ward Marsh, and Ernest De Journo. Correspondence and legal papers in this collection tend to relate to his publications, including contracts and copyrights; includes a letter from Jerome Dowd reflecting on the Tulsa Race Riot. There are also some legal proceedings from a 1920s court case between Dixon (defendent) and the National Drama Corporation, and some letters discussing Dixon's poor health. The collection includes some materials relating to Dixon's involvement with the Mount Mitchell Association, a land development company in Western North Carolina; materials on spirituality from Dixon's widow, Madelyn Donovan Dixon; family photographs and portraits of Dixon, his first wife (Harriet Dixon), his second wife (Madelyn Donovan Dixon), and some of his children and other relatives, at times unidentified; and assorted printed materials, flyers, notes, and unidentified drafts.