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אברהם יהושע השל היה מלומד והוגה דעות בעל שם בינלאומי, תיאולוג ופעיל חברתי ופוליטי. השל נולד בוורשה, פולין, נצר למשפחת רבנים חסידיים מיוחסת ולמד פילוסופיה בברלין. הוא גורש מפרנקפורט והגיע לוורשה ומשם עקר ללונדון ערב הפלישה הגרמנית לפולין. לאחר שהות קצרה בלונדון היגר השל לארצות הברית. בתחילה לימד בבית המדרש לרבנים של התנועה הרפורמית בסינסנטי, ולאחר מכן עבר לסמינר היהודי התיאולוגי בניו יורק שם שימש כפרופסור לאתיקה ולקבלה עד מותו בשנת 1972. בנוסף להשתתפותו הפעילה בנושאים של צדק חברתי ובדיאלוג הבין-דתי, היה השל גם מלומד ומורה רוחני ותרם תרומה חשובה למדעי היהדות. כהוגה דעות של הדת היתה מטרתו של השל להגביר ולהעמיק את התובנות הרוחניות של היהדות ובמהלך חייו השפיע על דורות של יהודים ולא- יהודים. הארכיון האישי של אברהם יהושע השל מקיף את השנים 1880-1998 ומתעד את חייו האישיים, האקדמיים והציבוריים. הארכיון כולל תכתובות, כתבים של השל ועליו, כתבי יד מודפסים, קטעי עיתונות, כתבים שיצאו לאור ומעט תמונות וחפצי קודש. האוסף מספק תובנות לזהותו של השל כמנהיג רוחני ומסביר כיצד היה מעמדו זה קשור בקשר עמוק לחייו האישיים והמקצועיים. האוסף מחולק לפי הנושאים הבאים: חומר מוקלט, התכתבויות, חומר אישי ומשפחתי, פעילות ציבורית, חומר מוגבל וכתבים. Abraham Joshua Heschel was an internationally known scholar, author, activist, and theologian. He was born in Warsaw, Poland into a distinguished family of Hasidic rebbes, and studied philosophy in Berlin, Germany. In 1938 he was deported from Frankfurt to Warsaw where he escaped to London just before the Nazi invasion. After a brief time in London he immigrated to the United States, first teaching at the Hebrew Union College and then at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America where he taught as Professor of Ethics and Mysticism until his death in 1972. In addition to his active participation in social justice issues and his interfaith work, Heschel was also a scholar and religious thinker who made significant contributions to Jewish studies. As a philosopher of religion, his goal was to make the spiritual insights of Judaism understandable and over the course of his lifetime influenced generations of Jews and non-Jews. The Abraham Joshua Heschel Papers span the years 1880 to 1998 and document Abraham Joshua Heschel's personal, academic, and public life. Items in this collection include correspondence, writings by and about Heschel, typescripts, clippings, printed material, and a small amount of photographs and artifacts. The materials in the collection provide insight to Heschel's identity as a spiritual leader and how this role was inextricably connected to his personal and professional life. The collection is organized into the following series: Audio, Correspondence, Personal and Family Materials, Public Activity, Restricted, and Writings.

The Abraham Joshua Heschel Papers span the years 1880 to 1998 and document Abraham Joshua Heschel's personal, academic, and public life, including his long-term involvement and leadership in social activism and other public activities, his reputation as a compelling and sought-after public speaker, and his far-reaching influence as a scholar and religious thinker. Items in this collection include correspondence, writings by and about Heschel, typescripts, clippings, printed material, and a small amount of photographs and artifacts. The materials in the collection provide insight to Heschel's identity as a spiritual leader and how this role was inextricably connected to his personal and professional life.

The collection is organized into the following series: Audio, Correspondence, Personal and Family Materials, Public Activity, Restricted, and Writings. Heschel maintained a meaningful, yet complex filing system. To balance preserving the original order with making the collection as accessible to researchers as possible, several key elements have been added to the collection guide:

•Scope note at the folder level. In many cases folder titles in the collection were reused, abbreviated, in Hebrew, or did not exist. Short descriptions of folder contents have been included not only to provide context for the materials, but also to make distinctions between the varying titles.

•Supplied/enhanced folder titles. In the case of missing or abbreviated titles, supplied titles (in brackets) were created. For folder titles written in Hebrew, the original folder title was documented along with its transliteration and English translation.

•Language extent. There are varying degrees in the amount of language materials in each folder and oftentimes multiple languages are represented in a single folder. To assist researchers, each folder description includes a note identifying the language(s) and their extent in the folder, with the dominant language listed first. The absence of a note indicates that all materials in the folder are in English. The following language categories are used: "A few" indicates that 1-25% of the materials are in another language(s); "Some" 26-65%; "Most" 66-99%; and "All" 100%.

Additionally there was a large of amount of clippings included in the Heschel collection which were generally in fragile condition. Where possible, these clippings were photocopied for preservation purposes and the originals discarded.

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Frederick Herzog papers, 1947-2011 (bulk 1947-1995) 32.4 Linear Feet — 24,300 Items

Frederick Herzog (1925-1995), former faculty member at the Duke Divinity School, was well known for his work on civil rights and liberation theology. The collection provides rich documentary evidence on the historical connections between religion, the Civil Rights Movement, and human rights. Material includes audio cassettes of lectures, minutes from Herzog's lectures and classes, several English and German manuscripts of Herzog's publications, research files, photographs, significant correspondence, and speeches and lectures. Several materials dated after 1995 were contributed by Kristin Herzog, Frederick Herzog's wife.

The Frederick Herzog Papers span the years 1947-2011 with the bulk of the material spanning the years 1947-1995, the year of Herzog's death. These papers provide rich documentary evidence on the historical connections between religion, the Civil Rights Movement, and human rights. The material covers specific areas in which Herzog was involved such as the Civil Rights Movement in Durham and other parts of North Carolina, Durham and Duke University history, student unrest in the 1960s, and human rights issues in Peru in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The collection includes video and audiocassettes regarding Herzog's involvement in Peru and various lectures and classes on theology. His work as a professor at the Duke Divinity School and with various other theological and civil rights organizations is documented in the correspondence he sent to and received from various individuals and groups, as well as in the various committee documents and minutes that record his professional activity in the university. The bulk of material on courses taught and lectures given by Herzog, as well as his participation in both the student exchange program with the University of Bonn and in the Peru and Bolivia student exchange program, can be found in his notebooks and course materials. A large part of this collection is comprised of Herzog's research files on religion, civil rights, labor organizing, racial issues, and protest in North Carolina and nationally, including Herzog's own participation in civil disobedience. Noteable research projects include his work in Peru, his work with the United Church of Christ (UCC) and the Evangelical Church of the Union (EKU), and his work with black churches and theology. This collection also contains original annotated drafts of a variety of Herzog's publications, sermons, speeches and lectures.

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The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is the largest film festival in the United States entirely devoted to documentary film. Originally the DoubleTake Documentary Film Festival, it is an international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of non-fiction cinema, held annually since 1998 in downtown Durham, North Carolina. Typically, more than 100 films are screened, along with discussions, panels, and workshops fostering conversation between filmmakers, film professionals and the public. The Full Frame Archive was created in 2007, as a partnership between Duke University and Full Frame. The Full Frame Archive Film Collection comprises preservation masters of documentary films that won awards at the Full Frame Film Festival between 1998 and 2012. Formats include 35mm film, 16mm film, Digital Betacam cassette, HDCAM cassette, Betacam SP cassette, and DVD. In addition, there is a complete set of festival program books. The films vary widely in topic and style, with a predominant emphasis on human rights issues; all of the films deal with social issues in one way or another. The collection is organized chronologically, by festival year, and acquisitions are ongoing.

The Full Frame Archive comprises program material, publicity-related material, and preservation masters of award-winning documentary films at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival (formerly DoubleTake) between 1998 and 2017. Film formats include 35mm film, 16mm film, Digital Betacam cassette, HDCAM cassette, Betacam SP cassette, and DVD. In addition, the collection contains festival program books, postcards, movie posters, t-shirts, tote bags, advertisements, newspaper clippings, press releases, and newspaper inserts.

The collection is organized chronologically, by festival year. Each series in the collection includes all acquired award winners from one year and available program material, when available. Each subseries comprises all the elements for one documentary work.

Whenever possible, the film is preserved on 35mm film, a duplicate preservation master especially created for this collection; occasionally, the work was originally filmed on 35mm, but more often it was recorded digitally and then transferred to film for festival screenings and theatrical release. Many films were never transferred to film, and in those cases, the highest quality digital master has been preserved, usually on Digital Betacam cassette, cloned from the master provided by the filmmaker or production company; other digital formats are represented as well.

While all are documentary films, some may also be considered belonging to the genres of biographical nonfiction, ethnographic, ethnic nonfiction and music. Feature, short and animation forms are all represented. The films vary widely in topic and style, with a predominant emphasis on human rights issues. All of the films deal with social issues in one way or another, including topics such as gender; family relations; education; life cycles (childhood, aging, death, etc.); crime and justice; minority groups and discrimination; public health; humanitarian aid; technology and social life; migration; democracy; economic development; war and conflict; peace and healing; art and society; religion; rehabilitation; etc.

Competition for awards has always been international; though the majority of award-winners are from and about the United States, the collection is also notably strong on topics relating to Africa and the Middle East. Only films completed within one year of the festival were eligible for competition, thus all are contemporary to the festival date. The number and type of awards given at the Festival changed from year to year; thus, each year is represented by a different number of films, selected according to varying criteria.

The Full Frame Archive was begun in late 2007 and acquisitions are ongoing. The films are donated by the filmmaker and/or copyright holder. Although the intent is to eventually preserve every Full Frame award winner, this may not be possible, as some copyright holders may decline to donate their work.

These preservation masters are stored in a climate-controlled facility off-site and may not be viewed. For viewing purposes, DVD use copies are available, backed up by a DVD master, also stored off-site.

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James Andrew Riddick papers, 1834-1903 1.3 Linear Feet — 620 Items

James Andrew Riddick, born September 13, 1810, near Sunsbury, N.C., died 1899, Petersburg, Va. As a youth, moved to Suffolk, Va., to become a clerk in his brother-in-law's mercantile establishment. Became a Methodist minister in the 1830s and served in this capacity in North Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee. The James Andrew Riddick papers includes mostly sermons and other writings by Methodist Reverend James Andrew Riddick. The majority of the sermons are undated and titled with only a book, chapter, and verse. However, some sermons are dated (1834-1844) and include title information with the location the sermon was given. These locations include Charlotte, Edenton, and Elizabeth City, North Carolina and Charlottesville, Richmond, and Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia. Other miscellaneous writings and notebooks date 1835-1886. There are also newspapers dated 1863-1903 with articles or letters to the editor written by or about Riddick, or collected by Riddick. Additionally, there is correspondence received by Riddick dated 1854-1899. The bulk of the correspondence is from John Early who Riddick worked with early in his career. There are photographs of Riddick as well as photographs of his daughters Judith, Lucie, and Bettie. Also included in this collection are papers with biographical information about Riddick and his letters of reference dated 1835-1899, a few miscellaneous financial papers dated 1830-1899, and a few miscellaneous printed materials collected by Riddick.

The James Andrew Riddick papers includes mostly sermons and other writings by Methodist Reverend James Andrew Riddick. The majority of the sermons are undated and titled with only a book, chapter, and verse. However, some sermons are dated (1834-1844) and include title information with the location the sermon was given. These locations include Charlotte, Edenton, and Elizabeth City, North Carolina and Charlottesville, Richmond, and Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia. Other miscellaneous writings and notebooks date 1835-1886. There are also newspapers dated 1863-1903 with articles or letters to the editor written by or about Riddick, or collected by Riddick. Additionally, there is correspondence received by Riddick dated 1854-1899. The bulk of the correspondence is from John Early who Riddick worked with early in his career. There are photographs of Riddick as well as photographs of his daughters Judith, Lucie, and Bettie. Also included in this collection are papers with biographical information about Riddick and his letters of reference dated 1835-1899, a few miscellaneous financial papers dated 1830-1899, and a few miscellaneous printed materials collected by Riddick.

Sermons are organized in folders grouped alphabetically by bible book and arranged within each folder numerically by chapter and verse. Sermons that do not refer to any book are grouped in a miscellaneous sermons and writings folder. Correspondence from John Early has been foldered separately from all other general correspondence and arranged by date. Newspapers have been arranged in folders by title and within each folder by date. Box 3 is oversize.