Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Subject Religion -- Study and teaching Remove constraint Subject: Religion -- Study and teaching Format Photographs Remove constraint Format: Photographs University Archives Record Group 29 — Papers of Faculty, Staff, and Associates Remove constraint University Archives Record Group: 29 — Papers of Faculty, Staff, and Associates

Search Results

collection icon

Charles A. Ellwood papers, 1889-1946 6.5 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Charles Abram Ellwood (1873-1946) established the Department of Sociology at Duke University in 1930, retiring in 1944. The papers feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at Missouri and Duke. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

The papers of sociologist Charles A. Ellwood feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at University of Missouri--Columbia and Duke University. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

collection icon

Hiram Earl Myers papers, 1910 - 1977 4.5 Linear Feet — 4500 Items

Hiram Earl Myers was a clergyman, theologian, and educator. He was ordained as a minister in the N.C. Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (1918) and was an active member as pastor and theologian. In 1926, Myers joined the Duke University faculty in as professor of biblical literature. He served as Chairman of the Department of Religion (1934-1936) and as Director of Undergraduate Studies in Religion (1937-1957). The collection consists of correspondence; texts of sermons and Sunday School lessons; prayers given in Duke Chapel; records of sermons, baptisms, and marriages; notes on sermon topics; photographs; pamphlets; blueprints; and other printed material. Major subjects include Myers' activities as a clergyman, his reflections on theological issues, and his involvement in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. English.

The collection reflects Myers' activities as a clergyman and his thoughts on theological issues. The collection consists of correspondence; texts of sermons and Sunday School lessons; prayers given in Duke Chapel; records of sermons, baptisms, and marriages; notes on sermon topics; pamphlets; and other printed material. Major subjects include Myers' activities as a clergyman, his reflections on theological issues, and his involvement in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

The Writings and Speeches Series is an important part of the collection. It includes the typed and manuscript texts of approximately three hundred sermons and Sunday School lessons given by Myers throughout his career as a minister, prayers used in Duke Chapel, and other writings.

The Correspondence Series includes correspondence with colleagues and family. Individual items of particular interest are letters from R.L. Flowers dealing with the aftermath of the deaths of James B. Duke and William Preston Few. Other correspondents include Sarah Pearson Duke, Josephus Daniels, Horace R. Kornegay, Sam J. Ervin, Jr., Y.E. Smith, William A. Erwin, and William B. Umstead. A few items within the correspondence deal with local Methodist affairs in the N.C. conference, particularly with ministerial appointments. Most of the correspondence is routine, although it occasionally reflects historical events such as the Great Depression and World War II.

Other series in the collection include Personal and Family Papers, Pastoral Records, Lake Junaluska, Duke University, and Subject Files.

Material directly related to Duke University is scanty. There are three folders of tests and examinations administered by Myers in his classes. Individual items of interest include Myers' reminiscences at the the 1960 alumni reunion and a copy of a poetic tribute to B. N. Duke by Wilbur F. Tillett of Vanderbilt University in 1928.

collection icon
online icon
Mason Crum (1887-1980) served on the faculty in the Department of Religion at Duke University from 1930 to 1957, specializing in race relations and Christianity, as well as the social history of the Gullah community of the South Carolina Sea Islands. The papers contain correspondence, printed material, writings, clippings, slides, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and and a sound recording. Subjects of interest include religious aspects of race relations and segregation, African American religion and churches, Gullah dialect and culture, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the Lake Junaluska, N.C. retreat. Photographs are of the Sea Islands, Lake Junaluska, Mason Crum's family, former slave Charles Baxter, and images relating to the Washington Duke family and Durham.

The Mason Crum papers include correspondence, printed material, hand written and typewritten manuscripts of books and articles, clippings, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and an audio tape, dating chiefly from 1931-1959. Crum acquired the materials over the course of his career as a professor of Biblical literature who had interests in African American history, psychology, race relations, and recent Methodist church history. His major area of research was the Gullah communities of Edisto and St. Helena, two of the South Carolina Sea Islands, with the bulk of work here dating from the 1930s; the result of the research was Gullah, published by Duke University Press in 1940.

Other areas of interest reflected in the papers are moral education, pastoral counseling, and religious pageantry. Crum's concern with Christianity and race relations is shown by his participation in cooperative efforts in education, and in the teaching of one of the first Black studies courses in the South (1954).

Also included in the papers are photographs from the Sea Islands, from Junaluska, N.C., and more personal images of family, children, and relating to the Washington Duke family in Durham, N.C.