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The Edgar Marquess Branch Papers span the years from 1939 to 2003, with the majority of the materials dating from 1960 to 1990. Through correspondence and writings, they document Branch's lifelong research on nineteenth-century American author Mark Twain. Important correspondents include such Twain scholars as Fred Anderson, Louis Budd, Cyril Clemens, Robert Hirst, and Henry Nash Smith. Topics chiefly focus on issues concerning academic writers, and Twain's life and literary output. Although the bulk of this collection concerns Branch's work on Twain, it should be noted that Professor Branch was also an eminent scholar of James T. Farrell, a twentieth-century American novelist best known for his "Studs Lonigan" series (1932-1935). Branch's papers are organized into three series: Correspondence, Special Projects Files, and Writings. Although Branch taught for many years as a Professor of English, there are no teaching materials in the collection. However, the correspondence may contain some references to teaching American literature and to activities as a faculty member at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

The Correspondence Series, the largest series in the collection, is organized into two subseries. The Individuals Subseries documents Branch's contacts over many decades with numerous Twain scholars, literary critics, and former students. There are also letters concerning his contacts with institutions such as the Mark Twain Boyhood Home Association. The Journals and Publishers Subseries contains Branch's correspondence with many well-known publishing firms and academic presses. Most of the correspondence is routine in nature but attests to Branch's lengthy and prolific writing career. In a few cases, drafts of writings are attached to his correspondence.

The bulk of the Mark Twain Special Projects Files Series consists of documents that pertain to Branch's service on the Board of Directors for the Mark Twain Project, based at the University of California at Berkeley, from 1980 to 1990. Administrative files and grant application files make up the majority of the materials.

The Writings Series consists of manuscripts and galley proofs of the Early Tales and Sketches of Mark Twain, Volume 1, and the page proofs for Early Tales and Sketches, Volume 2. Branch co-edited both of these volumes, which were published in 1979 and 1981, respectively.

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Frederick Herzog papers, 1947-2011 (bulk 1947-1995) 32.4 Linear Feet — 24,300 Items

Frederick Herzog (1925-1995), former faculty member at the Duke Divinity School, was well known for his work on civil rights and liberation theology. The collection provides rich documentary evidence on the historical connections between religion, the Civil Rights Movement, and human rights. Material includes audio cassettes of lectures, minutes from Herzog's lectures and classes, several English and German manuscripts of Herzog's publications, research files, photographs, significant correspondence, and speeches and lectures. Several materials dated after 1995 were contributed by Kristin Herzog, Frederick Herzog's wife.

The Frederick Herzog Papers span the years 1947-2011 with the bulk of the material spanning the years 1947-1995, the year of Herzog's death. These papers provide rich documentary evidence on the historical connections between religion, the Civil Rights Movement, and human rights. The material covers specific areas in which Herzog was involved such as the Civil Rights Movement in Durham and other parts of North Carolina, Durham and Duke University history, student unrest in the 1960s, and human rights issues in Peru in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The collection includes video and audiocassettes regarding Herzog's involvement in Peru and various lectures and classes on theology. His work as a professor at the Duke Divinity School and with various other theological and civil rights organizations is documented in the correspondence he sent to and received from various individuals and groups, as well as in the various committee documents and minutes that record his professional activity in the university. The bulk of material on courses taught and lectures given by Herzog, as well as his participation in both the student exchange program with the University of Bonn and in the Peru and Bolivia student exchange program, can be found in his notebooks and course materials. A large part of this collection is comprised of Herzog's research files on religion, civil rights, labor organizing, racial issues, and protest in North Carolina and nationally, including Herzog's own participation in civil disobedience. Noteable research projects include his work in Peru, his work with the United Church of Christ (UCC) and the Evangelical Church of the Union (EKU), and his work with black churches and theology. This collection also contains original annotated drafts of a variety of Herzog's publications, sermons, speeches and lectures.

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George Frederick Holmes papers, 1767-1960 3.6 Linear Feet — 586 Items

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Scholar, educator, and author of Charlottesville (Albemarle Co.), Virginia. Correspondence, notes, diaries, and literary works of George Frederick Holmes. Also contains correspondence of William Howard Perkinson, educator and son-in-law of Holmes; and of Joseph Henry Herndon Holmes and Mary Ann Pemberton Holmes, parents of George Frederick Holmes. Early papers of Joseph and Mary Holmes concern their life in Demerara, British Guyana, where Joseph Holmes was a barrister, and include legal papers, poems, and a genealogy. The papers of their son, George Frederick, a professor at the University of Virginia, include correspondence, diaries, articles, literary works, and notes, and relate to his interests in philology, grammar, history, political science and economics, and to Southern colleges and universities. The papers of William Howard Perkinson are confined to a few records of his work as a professor of Latin and Greek at the University of Virginia, a few business papers, and records of the administration of his father-in-law's estate.

Collection includes correspondence, notes, diaries, and literary works of George Frederick Holmes (1820-1897), scholar, educator, author; and correspondence of William Howard Perkinson (1861-1898), educator and son-in-law of Holmes; and of Joseph Henry Herndon Holmes (1794-1831) and Mary Ann (Pemberton) Holmes (1790-ca. 1862), father and mother of George Frederick Holmes. The papers of Joseph Henry Herndon Holmes, barrister of Demerara, British Guiana, consist of treatises on contracts and exchange of money, fragments of poetry, poems, his will, and pictures. Among the papers of Mary Ann (Pemberton) Holmes are the following: a brief record of her life in Demerara with interesting comments on the people and the country, family history and genealogy, personal letters, epitaphs, and verses of Stephen Pemberton written while attending Oriel College, Oxford, England.

The papers of George Frederick Holmes are chiefly concerned with family affairs, including financial troubles, and accounts from his wife, Eliza Lavalette (Floyd) Holmes, of the unsatisfactory performance of Negro servants; accounts of Holmes's connection with educational institutions, notably Richmond College, Virginia, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, the University of Mississippi, Oxford, and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. The correspondence throws considerable light on dissensions in the Board of Visitors at the College of William and Mary in 1848. The collection consists of Holmes's correspondence with leading literary figures and educators of the South; notes and works on almost every phase of philology, grammar, history, political science, and economics; notes for lectures; articles and manuscripts for books and periodicals; lists of students; examination questions; and diaries which cover a great part of the period from 1856 to 1891. The collection includes a letter book, 1834-1874, containing contemporary copies of letters, in Holmes's hand, of many notable figures, among whom are E. E. Bellinger, Auguste Comte, J. D. B. DeBow, Thos. R. Dew, R. T. W. Duke, Wm. H. Ellet, Geo. Fitzhugh, John B. Floyd, Wm. Harper, R. R. Howison, R. W. Hughes, D. F. Jamison, Wm. S. Lewis, Francis Lieber, P. N. Lynch, Jno. McClintock, Cornelius Mathews, W. E. Martin, B. B. Minor, W. G. Minor, T. V. Moore, J. D. Munford, Edw. Nicholson, Wm. Ogilby, Cotesworth Pinckney, J. D. Pope, Wm. C. Preston, Jas. Ryder, W. G. Simms, R. W. Singleton, A. G. Summer, Jno. R. Thompson, Jas. H. Thornwell, Samuel Tyler, and D. K. Whitaker.

Papers of William Howard Perkinson are confined to a few records of his work as professor of Latin and Greek at the University of Virginia, a few business papers, and records of the administration of the estate of George Frederick Holmes. Some of Perkinson's letters to his wife give glimpses of the management of the university and of his work. M. Schele De Vere and W. Gordon McCabe, as well as a number of scholars in England, were among Perkinson's correspondents.

[Description taken from the Guide to the Cataloged Collections in the Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University (1980)]

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Irvin Family papers, circa 1890s-2016 10.25 Linear Feet — 23 boxes; 2 oversize folders — approximately 5150 Items

Collection consists largely of correspondence between historian Nell Irvin Painter and her parents (1969-2003), documenting various stages of their lives, travels, and Painter's scholarly career. Also includes writings by or about Nell Painter, including reviews of her work; materials, including photographs and tintypes (circa 1890s-1910s) of African Americans in Victoria, Texas, kept by Frank and Dona Irvin, relating to their early life near Houston, and documenting aspects of African American history in that area; copies and reviews of Dona Irvin's writings; documents related to Frank and Dona's education and careers; family photographs; videos; Frank irvin's diary (2000-2003); legal papers; and other items. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists largely of correspondence between historian Nell Irvin Painter and her parents (1969-2003), documenting various stages of their lives, travels, and Painter's scholarly career. Also includes writings by or about Nell Painter, including reviews of her work; copies and reviews of Dona Irvin's writings; documents related to Frank and Dona's education and careers; Frank irvin's diary (2000-2003); legal papers; and other items.

Photographs also form an important part of the collection. Along with papers and records, Frank and Dona Irvin kept early photos and tintypes (circa 1890s-1910s) of African Americans in Victoria, Texas; together, these materials speak to their early life near Houston, and document aspects of African American history in that area. There are also family photographs from later decades (1930s-1980s).

For preservation purposes, original audiovisual media are closed to use; copies may be available on request.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Professor of American literature, Duke University, Durham, N.C. The Jay B. Hubbell Papers span the years from 1816 to 1998, with the bulk of the material documenting Hubbell's career from his early student years in the 1920s until his death in 1979. The collection consists mainly of his professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, articles written by others at his request for the Jay B. Hubbell Center, printed materials inscribed to him and written by him, and unpublished manuscripts. The material chronicles the four decades of Hubbell's career as professor and critic, which he dedicated to the growth and development of American literature as a field of critical inquiry. Among the many significant correspondents or subjects of others' writings are Conrad Aiken, Gay Wilson Allen, Robert Frost, Clarence Gohdes, members of the Hubbell family, Ralph Leslie Rusk, Carl Sandburg, Allen Tate, Arlin Turner, and John Hall Wheelock. Other significant topics covered by the material include the founding of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University, the study and teaching of literature from the American South, the activities of the faculty at Duke University, and the development of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association (MLA).

The Jay B. Hubbell Papers span the years from 1816 to 1998, with the bulk of the material documenting Hubbell's career from his early student years in the 1920s until his death in 1979. The collection consists mainly of his professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, articles written by others at his request for the Jay B. Hubbell Center, printed materials inscribed to him and written by him, and unpublished manuscripts. The material chronicles the four decades of Hubbell's career as professor and critic, which he dedicated to the growth and development of American literature as a field of critical inquiry. Among the many significant correspondents or subjects of others' writings are Conrad Aiken, Gay Wilson Allen, Robert Frost, Clarence Gohdes, members of the Hubbell family, Ralph Leslie Rusk, Carl Sandburg, Allen Tate, Arlin Turner, and John Hall Wheelock. Other significant topics covered by the material include the founding of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University, the study and teaching of literature from the American South, the activities of the faculty at Duke University, and the development of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association (MLA). The collection is divided into eight series: Biographical; Correspondence, Alphabetical; Correspondence by Date; Writings and Speeches; Subject Files; Teaching Abroad; Photographs; and Clippings.

The Biographical Data Series contains correspondence, manuscripts of his autobiographical writings, financial and legal documents, writings by his siblings, curriculum vitae, and obituaries, all of which chronicle Hubbell's life from his earliest years until his death.

The largest component of the collection contains correspondence from colleagues, former students, and literary figures. The Correspondence, Alphabetical Series consists of many letters from students and colleagues. The bulk of the correspondence gives shape to the nature and status of American literary studies in the early- to mid-twentieth century. In particular, the many letters exchanged among Hubbell, his colleagues, and his students provide insight into the routine professional life of this first pioneering generation of scholars. From job appointments to topics of scholarship, the letters uncover the kinds of professional interests and pressures that influenced the formation of American literary studies. Additional miscellaneous letters are arranged chronologically in the Correspondence by Date Series. These letters mainly represent single items from colleagues, publishers, and minor writers. The same topics are represented here as in the correspondence arranged alphabetically.

Jay B. Hubbell authored numerous articles and books throughout his career which contributed to the bibliography of American literary studies. Samples of such are located in the collection's Writings and Speeches Series. The series is divided into two subseries, the Writings by Hubbell Subseries and the Writings by Others Subseries. The Writings by Hubbell Subseries includes unpublished manuscripts, publication files consisting of correspondence with publishers and review clippings, and printed material consisting of article reprints and reviews. The Writings by Others Subseries contains articles and essays by Hubbell's colleagues and peers, as well as several essays that Hubbell collected on topics of interest to him. It also contains several memoirs which narrate the lives and influence of several key figures in the first generations of American literary scholars.

The Subject Files Series chronicles some of the major events, interests, and projects of Hubbell's career. His involvement with the Modern Language Association is represented by material filed in the General Files Subseries. Also included in this subseries is material concerning several of his institutional affiliations, including Clemson University, Columbia University, and Southern Methodist University (SMU). Hubbell's papers concerning his many professional projects can be found in the Projects Subseries, such as the Checklist of Manuscripts and the Center for Southern Studies. Information related to many of the subject files can be found throughout the collection, particularly in the Biographical Data and Correspondence Series.

Jay Hubbell dedicated a generous portion of his scholarly career to teaching and students. Besides his interest in different configurations and institutions for furthering learning and scholarship, Hubbell spent several years teaching abroad. The Teaching Abroad Series contains correspondence and incidentals concerning his service at universities in Vienna, Jerusalem, and Athens. This series includes materials which highlight Hubbell's experiences at the intersection of American foreign policy and university teaching, as Hubbell served as a Visiting Expert for the U.S. Army in Vienna as well as a quickly evacuated Visiting Professor in Jerusalem in 1956, during the Arab-Israeli conflict.

The Photographs Series includes photographs of Hubbell, family, and colleagues. The series includes portraits of Hubbell alone as well as with family.

The Clippings Series contains newspaper and journal clippings recording the many significant personal and professional events of Hubbell's life. The series also includes clippings about contemporary events, friends, and colleagues which Hubbell found noteworthy.

Hubbell's papers pertaining to English Department matters and committee assignments can be found in the Duke University Archives. The David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University houses many related collections, particularly in the Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography: the records of American Literature; American Literary Manuscripts; and the Modern Language Association's American Literature Section and Southern Literature Discussion Group; and the papers of Gay Wilson Allen, Sacvan Berkovitch, Cathy Davidson, and Arlin Turner.

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Nell Irvin Painter papers, 1793-2019 and undated, bulk 1876-2007 184.25 Linear Feet — Approx. 134,625 Items

Nell Irvin Painter is a scholar, teacher, and writer in 19th- and 20th-century American and African American history who has been a faculty member of Harvard, Princeton, and the Universities of North Carolina and Pennsylvania. Collection spans the years 1793-2019, with the bulk of the material dating between 1876 and 2007, and contains correspondence, research notes, photocopies of original documents, manuscripts, publication proofs, syllabi, department memoranda, records of her speaking engagements, photographs, personal journals, papers, and photographs, many varying audiovisual formats, and computer diskettes. Also contains extensive file series related to the research and writing of five of her major books: Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas after Reconstruction; The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South; Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919; Sojourner Truth, A Life, A Symbol; and Creating Black Americans: African-American History and its Meanings, 1619 to the Present.

The Nell Irvin Painter Papers span the years 1793-2019, with the bulk of the material dating between 1876 and 2007, and are primarily composed of the extensive correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, and other professional papers that Painter has produced in her long career as a scholar, teacher, and writer in 19th- and 20th-century American and African American history. The materials document the breadth and depth of Painter's interests and her intellectual and personal influence on a generation of historians. Her varied roles as student, teacher, colleague, and mentor are recorded in a wide variety of formats: correspondence with colleagues, students, family, and friends; syllabi, department memoranda, and meeting minutes from her graduate and faculty positions at Harvard, Princeton, and the Universities of North Carolina and Pennsylvania; materials from many professional organizations in the fields of African American history, Southern history, American studies, and women's studies; and records of her speaking engagements, conferences, and meetings. Painter the historian and author are revealed in the extensive notes, photocopies, recordings, photographs, manuscripts, and proofs produced in writing many articles and five of her major books: Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas after Reconstruction; The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South; Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919; Sojourner Truth, A Life, A Symbol; and Creating Black Americans: African-American History and its Meanings, 1619 to the Present. The portrait is rounded out by the materials in other series: personal files, which include materials from her student years at Harvard and abroad in Ghana and France as well as personal journals; a few papers of Ghanaian writer Ayi Kwei Armah; photographs, including many historical photographs of African Americans as well as many personal snapshots in color and black-and-white; and other non-print media such as audiotapes, audiocassettes, videocassettes, and computer diskettes.

Painter's research files contain a wealth of information about many topics in American history: biography of African Americans; biography as a literary form; slavery; Reconstruction; the 1870s migration from the South to Kansas; a variety of social reform movements--such as abolition, communism, labor, and women's suffrage--and movers, such as Sojourner Truth and Hosea Hudson; and the history of social conditions and political change in the United States from the early-19th to the mid-20th century, particularly as expressed in race relations, in women's history, and in the South. At the same time, Painter's papers also constitute a contemporary record of many trends in American culture such as career and educational choices and opportunities for academic women and African American professionals. Her correspondence with students, colleagues, and longtime friends such as Nellie Y. McKay, her teaching material and academic files, her papers from an array of historians' organizations, and her personal journals each shed their own light on these themes.

The collection is arranged in these series: Correspondence, Writings and Research, Teaching Materials, Professional Service, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, Audiovisual Materials,Electronic Formats, and a collection of private papers collected by Painter, the Ayi Kwei Armah Papers. The first four series comprise almost eighty percent of the physical extent of the collection and are each divided into several subseries. The Correspondence Series follows Painter's personal life, education, and professional career from her graduate years at Harvard in the late 1960s through her retirement from Princeton in 2004.

The Writings and Research Series is arranged in seven subseries, the first five of which are based on five of Painter's major books; the final two subseries are Other Research Topics, which gathers many of Painter's shorter writings, and Writings by Others. With the exception of the last, all the subseries here contain correspondence with colleagues and editors; typescript drafts of works; various stages of proof; extensive photocopies of archival materials and published articles; voluminous notes about her readings and research; and some photographs and recordings, most of which have been removed to their respective series for preservation.

The Teaching Materials Series documents Painter's work with students and academic colleagues at Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of North Carolina, Hunter College, and Princeton University. It is arranged into two series: Courses Subseries, with syllabi, reading lists, and Painter's notes on the development of her courses that reflect the evolution of women's studies and African American studies in the curriculum; and the Academic Files Subseries, revealing Painter's many different roles over three decades: graduate student, job applicant, junior and tenured faculty member, dissertation advisor, mentor, and department head.

The Professional Service Series, arranged in two subseries, documents Painter's activities in the broader academic community beyond her university of employment and her personal connections through materials from well over one hundred professional organizations, conferences, foundations, committees and task forces, as well as editorial boards of journals and publishers with which Painter has worked during her career. The Engagements Subseries gathers documents relating to addresses, speeches, and awards ceremonies at some three hundred conferences, meetings, and symposia.

Five smaller series and a gathering of oversize material round out the collection. The Personal Files Series contains an assortment of records such as curriculum vitae; documents about her family; and some records of her student years, especially her travel and study in France and Africa. The series includes some three dozen personal journals covering most of the years from 1959-2005 containing entries about her life and career (NOTE: some journals are CLOSED to use; see details in the series note). The Photographic Materials Series contains several hundred photographs, negatives, and slides, predominantly personal and travel snapshots but also including professional portraits of Painter as well as a number of original photographs and reproductions of archival photographs she used in her research and writing. Much of the material in the early years of the Audiovisual Materials Series is related to her research and writing; by the 1990s, the content shifts focus to documenting Painter herself on the occasion of various interviews and addresses. The Electronic Formats Series consists of diskettes containing correspondence and drafts of writings. The Oversize Materials contains items from several series and subseries are gathered. The final series in the collection consists not of Painter's own work but that of a Ghanaian novelist and poet; see the Ayi Kwei Armah Papers (RESTRICTED) series note for further information on the provenance and usage of these materials.

Unprocessed additions to the collection are listed at the end of the collection guide.

Note about date range of materials: The primary material produced by Painter begins around 1959 with her earliest journals. Earlier dates in various series, occurring mainly in Writings and Research, reflect the intellectual content and original publication of the large volume of reproduced research material present in the collection.

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Paul Edgar Hubbell papers, 1854-1986 1 Linear Foot — 148 Items

Hubbell was Professor emeritus of History at East Michigan University and brother of Jay B. Hubbell. The collection includes family papers, correspondence, writings, and other material.

This collection consists largely of letters from Jay B. Hubbell to his brother Paul and his family discussing family matters, Hubbell genealogy, careers, publications, and politics, and current events. Other items include one letter from David S. Hubbell to his son Paul; photographs of Lucinda Hubbell and Jay Hubbell; writings by or about Jay B. Hubbell; a program of the Lamar Memorial Lectures; two volumes of GRANT STREET VERSE; a xeroxed copy of "A Tribute to Professor Kenneth Ballard Murdock, Honored Scholar of Early American Literature" from EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE magazine; poems by Paul E. Hubbbel, including one entitled "In Academici Memoriam" written in memory of his brother in 1979; a 1985 essay by Paul E. Hubbell entitled "The Making of Edward Gibbon, 1737-1778;" and clippings concerning the death of Wilburt C. Davison.

Additional papers pertain to the family of Anne Thompson Hubbell, the wife of Paul Hubbell, and include a biographical sketch of her father Dr. Kimbro Thompson, a deed for land in Carroll Co., Va. (later the site of Hillsville Academy) from Calvin Mitchell to Benjamin F. Thompson, brother of Kimbro Thompson, dated 12 March 1854; another deed for 100 acres in Surry Co., N.C., to Jesse Isaaks, singed by Governor Z.B. Vance and dated 23 January 1863 (the surveyor's report is attached); a copy of the will of John J. McMickle of Surry Co., N.C., dated 25 October 1892, which names Dr. Kimbro Thompson, his son-in-law, as executor; three compositions by Kimbro Thompson, who was also an ordained minister in the Baptist Church; four letters, one to Kimbro Thompson's brother dated 21 January 1856, one written by W.O.T. Banner to his cousin while Banner was a prisoner at Johnsons Island, Oh., dated 24 November 1864, one from J.B. Jones to Rev. Thompson dated 20 October 1868 pertaining to missionary work in western Va., and one from Mame Thompson Woodhouse, sister of Anne Thompson Hubbel, dater 26 April 1930; copies of three notes promising to pay varying amounts of money; a certification of the unfitness of Benjamin F. Thompson for military service and his discharge of November 13, 1862; tax receipt of Benjamin F. Thompson for the year 1856; a scrapbook of Lucy McMickle, wife of Dr. Kimbro Thompson, in which clippings of agricultural pointers, stories, poems, etc. have been pasted on pages which apparently were Dr. Thompson's notes on diseases and medications, recipes, poems, and copies of letters have been added; a notebook fo Anne Thompson from Meredith College, Raleigh, N.C.; clippings of pictures of some of her classmates.

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Poet and librarian, of Washington, D.C. Also sister of Jay B. Hubbell, Professor of American Literature, Duke University. The Ruth Ann Hubbell papers span the years from 1905 to 1986, with the bulk dating from 1926 to 1972. The collection consists mainly of correspondence between Ruth Ann Hubbell, her brother Jay Broadus Hubbell, and other members of the Hubbell family, but there are also some materials on the establishment of the Hubbell Center at Duke University, a small group of photographs, and folders of writings by Ruth Ann Hubbell, Jay Broadus Hubbell, Paul Edgar Hubbell, and other individuals. The collection is divided into six series: Clippings, Correspondence, Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography, Miscellany, Pictures, and Writings.

The Ruth Ann Hubbell Papers span the years from 1905 to 1986, with the bulk dating from 1926 to 1972. The collection consists mainly of correspondence between Ruth Ann Hubbell, her brother Jay Broadus Hubbell, and other members of the Hubbell family, but there are also some materials on the establishment of the Hubbell Center at Duke University, and some photographs and writings of Ruth Ann Hubbell, Jay Broadus Hubbell, Paul Edgar Hubbell (their brother), and other individuals. The collection is divided into six series: Clippings, Correspondence, Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography, Miscellany, Photographs, and Writings. These series are described fully below.

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The Wesley Works Editorial Project, founded in 1960, is an international and inter denominational consortium of scholars that is producing a complete critical edition of the works of John Wesley, the 18th century Church of England clergyman who was a primary founder of Methodism. The Wesley Works Archive, dating from 1676 to 1996, with the bulk ranging from 1724-1791 and 1960-1996, forms part of the working papers of the Wesley Works Editorial Project (WWEP). The collection consists of that portion of the project's documents gathered by Frank Baker during almost four decades of service as the WWEP's editor and main bibliographer, and consists of the correspondence, writings, research, printed materials, photocopied manuscripts, proofs, and other materials produced by Baker and the many other historians, theologians, and clergy, who have participated in the Project. There is much information not only about the founding and early history of the Methodist and Wesleyan Methodist Churches, but also about the history of religious thought and dissent in 18th century England, the Evangelical Revival, and the history of publishing; materials in the collection also throw light on such topics as scholarly publishing and textual criticism.

The Wesley Works Archive, 1676-1996 and undated, bulk 1724-1791, 1960-1996, forms part of the working papers of the Wesley Works Editorial Project (WWEP). Formed in 1960, this international and inter denominational consortium of scholars is producing a complete critical edition of the works of John Wesley, the 18th century Church of England clergyman who was a primary founder of Methodism. The collection consists of that portion of the Project's documents gathered by Frank Baker during almost four decades of service as the WWEP's General Editor, Textual Editor, and main bibliographer, and consists of the correspondence, writings, research, printed materials, photocopied manuscripts, proofs, and other materials produced by Baker and the many other historians, theologians, and clergy who have participated in the Project. Because John Wesley preached, wrote, and published so widely, the content of the research materials required for a full edition of his writings necessarily contains much information not only about the founding and early history of the Methodist and Wesleyan Methodist Churches, but also much information about the history of religious thought and dissent in 18th century England, the Evangelical Revival, and the history of publishing. Beyond the ostensible purpose of the WWEP, however, the modern correspondence and scholarly debate contained in these papers also throws light on such topics as scholarly publishing and textual criticism.

The collection also sheds light on the history and mechanics of the transmission of texts. That is, while the reproduced printed materials here document the complex publishing and textual history of the thousands of editions of Wesley's writings to appear in his lifetime alone, at the same time the original writings of modern scholars involved in the WWEP document how older texts are researched and recovered from the past, all for the purpose of establishing a present authoritative text to be passed on to the future.

Series in the Wesley Works Archive are arranged to correspond to the unit structure of the thirty-five volume Bicentennial Edition. Described more fully below, the initial sixteen series of the archive and the sixteen units and thirty-five volumes of the Bicentennial Edition are as follows: Sermons (1-4); Explanatory Notes upon the New Testament (5-6); A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (7); Worship (8); The Methodist Societies (9-10); The Appeals to Men of Reason and Religion and Certain Related Open Letters (11); Doctrinal and Controversial Treatises (12-13); Social/Political Tracts (14); Catechetical/Educational Works (15); Editorial Works (16); Medical Writings (17); Journals and Diaries (18-24); Letters (25-31); Oxford Diaries (32); Bibliography (33-34); and Index and Miscellanea (35). A concluding seventeenth series, General Files, gathers materials about the overall history and organization of the WWEP.

The history of the Wesley Works Editorial Project already extends more than fifty years, from its inception in 1960 to the 2011 publication of The Methodist Societies: The Minutes of Conference. This volume, as the seventeenth to be published, marks the halfway point of the entire Bicentennial Edition, which will comprise thirty-four volumes plus a concluding general index volume. Although the General Files are placed as the final series in order to avoid interrupting the parallel structure of series and volumes, they actually mark the best place to begin an overview of the collection, since their various folder groups document much of the administrative history of the Project. Overviews and details of the Project's inception, history, institutional support, and editorial guidelines are best found in the folder groups for the Board of Directors and the Editorial Board. The history of the actual content, intellectual structure, and presentation of volumes can be found in such groups as grouped under such categories as Editorial Procedures and Bulletins of the WWP. Most of the latter were issued by Frank Baker in the 1970s and contain much detail about the content and style choices that were being made for various volumes. The General Files also contain materials that may relate to more than one unit of the Bicentennial Edition, as well as some Wesley publications not selected for inclusion, especially his Explanatory Notes Upon the Old Testament.