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Hammond family papers, 1751-1914, bulk 1820s-1890s 6 Linear Feet — Approx. 3507 Items

Residents of Frederick County, Maryland. Collection consists chiefly of business and legal papers of various members of the Hammond family of Maryland. The earliest items (1750s-1820s) are land grants and other land records of Nathan Hammond and Vachel Hammond. The papers of Thomas Hammond, who served as a judge of the Orphans' Court of Frederick Co., are mainly the records of his service as administrator of several estates or as guardian of orphans, but also include farm records, financial receipts, and slave purchases. The papers of Dawson V. Hammond, brother of Thomas, concern the administration of estates, including Thomas's holdings. There are a few references to Unionist sympathies in Maryland during the Civil War and economic conditions in the U.S. during the 1870s.

Collection consists chiefly of business and legal papers of various members of the Hammond family of Maryland. The earliest items (1750s-1820s) are land grants and other land records of Nathan Hammond and Vachel Hammond. The papers of Thomas Hammond, who served as a judge of the Orphans' Court of Frederick Co., are mainly the records of his service as administrator of several estates or as guardian of orphans, but also include farm records, financial receipts, and slave purchases. The papers of Dawson V. Hammond, brother of Thomas, concern the administration of estates, including Thomas's holdings. There are a few references to Unionist sympathies in Maryland during the Civil War and economic conditions in the U.S. during the 1870s. A later addition to the collection in the last two boxes consists of legal papers and financial volumes.

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John W. Williams papers, 1822-1835 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 32 Items

John W. Williams was a Philadelphia lawyer. A small collection of legal papers, correspondence, and clippings chiefly concerning an 1835 lawsuit in which Robert Aitken of Baltimore alleged that a mulatto girl living in Philadelphia was Emily Winder, the daughter of Milly Winder. Milly Winder was Aitken's former slave whom he had freed in 1824, while keeping her daughter as his slave. Aitken claimed that the child had been stolen from him and given to Jacob Gilmore and his wife, free African Americans, to raise as their child. John W. Williams handled Aitken's suit for the girl's return. Includes affidavits, subpoenas, and notes on the testimonies of both black and white witnesses for the defense and the prosecution, including the testimony of Milly Winder, who told of her attempts to locate her daughter after she was freed.

Samll collection of legal papers, correspondence, and clippings chiefly concerning an 1835 lawsuit in which Robert Aitken of Baltimore alleged that a mulatto girl living in Philadelphia was Emily Winder, the daughter of Milly Winder. Milly Winder was Aitken's former slave whom he had freed in 1824, keeping her daughter as his slave. Aitken claimed that the child had been stolen from him ten years earlier and given to Jacob Gilmore and his wife, free African Americans, to raise as their child. Gilmore claimed that the defendant could not be the slave Aitken was searching for, in that he claimed that a woman gave the girl to him and his wife several years before Aitken's slave went missing.

Papers include the notes and evidence compiled by John W. Williams, the lawyer for the plaintiff Aitken, to present the case before the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas. The lawyer for the defense was David Paul Brown. Witnesses for the defense claim to have known Emily as a little girl in Philadelphia prior to 1825, and believed her to be white, while witnesses for the prosecution claimed Emily was Aitken's missing slave. Includes the testimony of Milly Winder, who told of her attempts to locate her daughter after she was freed and who claimed that the woman in question could not be her daughter that went missing. This case occurred before the passing of the Federal Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, which removed the possibility of a court trial prior to the removal of an alleged fugitive slave.

Collection arranged chronologically within one folder.

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Robert Smith Rodgers papers, 1827-1897 and undated 3.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,389 Items

Colonel, 2nd Maryland Eastern Shore Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army. Chiefly Civil War papers belonging to Colonel Robert Rodgers, including military correspondence; telegrams; muster rolls; rosters of officers and staff; lists of deserters, recruits, reenlistments, and voluntary enlistments; reports of sick, wounded, and convalescents; inventories of personal effects of the deceased; hospital and army paroles; morning reports; ordnance returns, invoices, requisitions, issues, and transfers; quartermaster papers; letter book containing routine military correspondence; and general and special orders. After 1863 there are references to African American contrabands. There is also a fragmentary account of the regiment's war experiences concerning the actions in Maryland in 1862 and 1863, including the battle between the U.S.S. Monitor and the C.S.S. Virginia, and in Virginia and West Virginia in 1864. Also included in the collection are papers relating to the Rodgers family of Maryland, including Rodgers's son Robert Slidell Rodgers, practicing law in Missouri following the Civil War.

Chiefly Civil War military papers belonging to Colonel Robert Rodgers, including military correspondence; telegrams; muster rolls; rosters of officers and staff; lists of deserters, recruits, reenlistments, and voluntary enlistments; reports of sick, wounded, and convalescents; inventories of personal effects of the deceased; hospital and army paroles; morning reports; ordnance returns, invoices, requisitions, issues, and transfers; quartermaster papers; letter book containing routine military correspondence; and general and special orders. There are references after 1863 to treatment of and problems with contrabands. There is also a fragmentary account written by Rodgers of the regiment's war experiences concerning the actions in Maryland in 1862 and 1863, including the battle between the U.S.S. Monitor and the C.S.S. Virginia, and in Virginia and West Virginia in 1864.

Scattered papers relate to other members of the Rodgers family, and include personal correspondence, letters relating to naval matters, estate papers, bills and receipts, and legal papers concerning land deeds and the manumission of a slave by Rodger's mother Minerva in the 1850s. There is an inventory of the property of Jerusha Denison at "Sion Hill" in 1856. Also included are materials for the study of navigation and a navigational logbook.

For many more details on the papers and the volumes in the collection, please ask a reference archivist to consult the main card file.

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Over 200 pieces of correspondence dating from 1759–1880, written by women of the Saltar and Gordon families of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland between themselves and other family relations. Over a third of the letters date before 1825. The principal correspondents are Elizabeth 'Betsy" Gordon Saltar, her daughters Lucy Saltar and Frances "Fanny" Saltar, and Elizabeth's cousins Mary Gordon and Polly Gordon. Dozens of other letters come from family friends and relatives, male and female, from prominent families in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, New York, and some from the Midwest and New England states. Topics include courtship; marriage; religion; pastimes; visits and travel; and the welfare of family members and friends. There are many references to illnesses, with many details on treatments and outcomes. There are also long passages and references to grief and mourning on the death of loved ones, and some discussions of finances. There are a few references to slavery and to enslaved people and servants. Letters sent during the Civil War discuss events centered around Pennsylvania, particularly in 1863; one discusses African American troops and their role in the war, and the circumstances surrounding the recruitment of the 3rd United States Colored Troops' commander, Benjamin C. Tilghman. A few earlier letters speak of the War of 1812, especially in and around Baltimore and Philadelphia. Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The papers consist almost entirely of 266 pieces of correspondence dating from 1759–1880, written by women of the Saltar and Gordon families of Pennsylvania and Maryland between themselves and other family relations. Over one-third of the letters date before 1825. The principal correspondents are Elizabeth 'Betsy" Gordon Saltar, the family matriarch, Lucy Saltar, Frances "Fanny" Saltar, Mary Gordon, and Polly Gordon. There are also single letters from other female members of the Saltar family and a handful of letters from men, some of whom were Saltar family members. The letters are organized by correspondent name, ending with a group of letters addressed to unidentified individuals.

The manuscript pages total approximately 765, primarily bifolios, almost all written in ink. There are also four additional manuscripts: an invitation; a sheet of paper with receipts; and a memorandum and bond concerning a land sale. A number of later letters are accompanied by addressed envelopes, some with stamps.

The correspondence is almost entirely comprised of women writing to other women: mothers to daughters; daughters to mothers; and cousins to cousins; and friends to each other. Over half of the collection comprises letters to and from a family matriarch, Elizabeth Gordon Saltar, living at her residence at Magnolia Grove (near Frankford, Pa.), and a large group of letters sent by various correspondents to her daughter Fanny Saltar, who was one of the family's historians. Also present is a large group of correspondence between cousins Elizabeth Gordon Saltar and Mary Gordon, as well as letters addressed to Elizabeth Gordon Saltar's other daughter Lucy Saltar, and letters addressed to Elizabeth Gordon Saltar's cousins, Mary Gordon and Polly Gordon.

Other families who correspond and/or are mentioned often in the letters: Bowne, Brooks, Bunyan, Coleman, Drexel, Hartshorne, Howell, Lardner, McMurtrie, Morgan, Morris, Stillman, Tilghman, Ulstick, Van Dykes, and Wharton. Many of these are prominent families from Pennsylvania or Maryland. One letter from a Bowne in series 7 contains a partial family tree of the Bownes and Saltar families. Most of these letters are found in the Fanny Saltar series.

Among the places from which letters were sent are areas in Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York State, New Jersey, Illinois, Ohio, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Paris (France), and Rome (Italy). Cities represented are Boston, Baltimore, Charleston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, and others. Many letters were sent to or from Magnolia Grove, the Saltar plantation home near Philadelphia.

Topics tend to focus on societal mores and customs of the times as experienced by married and single women of land-owning classes: courtship; marriage; religion; pastimes; visits and travel; and the welfare of family members and friends. There are many references to illnesses such as measles, bowel complaints, eye conditions, diphtheria, tumors, and mental illness, with many details on treatments and outcomes. There are also long passages and references to grief and mourning on the death of loved ones, and fairly frequent mentions of finances.

The letters written during the Civil War discuss events centered around Pennsylvania, particularly in 1863, as well as a comment on friends going off to war, and one letter discusses African American troops and the circumstances surrounding the recruitment of the 3rd United States Colored Troops' commander, Benjamin C. Tilghman, whom the Saltars knew from Philadelphia. Earlier letters speak of the War of 1812, especially of events around Baltimore.

Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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The Hall family of Anne Arundel County, Maryland, were enslavers and owners of tobacco plantations. Collection includes three generations of the Hall family and documents their involvement with tobacco and other plantation operations in Maryland during the 18th and 19th centuries, including the shift to lumber and wheat after 1800. Also includes information on cotton plantations in South Carolina and the sale of cotton to England, Maryland politics and government in the 1780s, insurrections by enslaved people, and naval impressment at the time of the War of 1812.

Collection includes three generations of the Hall family and documents their involvement with tobacco and other plantation operations in Maryland during the 18th and 19th centuries, including the shift to lumber and wheat after 1800. Also includes information on cotton plantations in South Carolina and the sale of cotton to England, Maryland politics and government in the 1780s, insurrections by enslaved people, and naval impressment at the time of the War of 1812.