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On February 13, 1969, Duke University students in the Afro-American Society occupied the the main administration building to bring attention to the needs of black students. These needs included an African American studies department, a black student union, and increased enrollment and financial support for black students. This and subsequent events became known as the Allen Building Takeover. The Allen Building Takeover Collection contains announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, ephemera, clippings, a bibliography, photographs documenting Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969), student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to remembering the Takeover, including the 2002 Allen Building lock-in. Major subjects include African American students and civil rights demonstrations. English.

The collection features materials documenting the Allen Building Takeover at Duke University. The Subject files include photographs, announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, and ephemera relating to Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969) and student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. Photographs were taken by student participant Lynette Lewis and show the students inside the building during the Takeover. Also included are clippings of newspaper and magazine coverage of the Takeover from the campus paperThe Chronicle, as well as local, state, and national media.

In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to anniversaries and remembrance of the Takeover. Students created artwork in this collection while participating in the 2002 Allen Building lock-in, an event commemorating 1960s activism at Duke and an opportunity for students and administrators to discuss the racial climate on campus.

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On February 13, 1969, Duke University students in the Afro-American Society occupied the the main administration building to bring attention to the needs of black students. These needs included an African American studies department, a black student union, and increased enrollment and financial support for black students. This and subsequent events became known as the Allen Building Takeover. The Allen Building Takeover Oral History Collection includes oral histories conducted by Duke student Don Yannella in 1985 leading to his thesis Race Relations at Duke University and the Allen Building Takeover. The collection includes the original interview tapes, transcripts of the some of the interviews, and use copies of several of the original recordings.

The Allen Building Takeover Oral History Collection includes materials collected by Duke student Don Yannella while writing his senior thesis in 1985. The oral histories offer first-hand accounts of and reactions to the Takeover from Duke students, staff, administrators, and members of the Durham community.

The interviews were recorded on cassette tapes, and these original tapes are in Box 1. Access copies and transcripts for many of the interviews are included; listening copies are in Box 2 and transcripts are in Box 3.

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The Associated Students of Duke University (ASDU) was the student government at Duke from 1967 to 1993. It originated in March 1967 when the student body voted to merge the Men's Student Government Association and the Women's Student Government Association. ASDU consisted of an executive branch and a legislative branch. A student referendum in April 1993 replaced ASDU with a new organization, Duke Student Government, in which the legislative and executive branches were consolidated. ASDU records consist of minutes, correspondence, legislation, reports, printed matter, judicial decisions, charters, memoranda, speeches, receipts, vouchers, and other records. The ASDU records provide insight into student life during a time when students were becoming more active in university affairs. The records also document student organizations at Duke at this time and demonstrate some of the services provided to students by ASDU.

The records of the Associated Students of Duke University span from 1965-1991, covering the years that ASDU existed, as well as a few items prior to the establishment of ASDU in 1967. The bulk of the material focuses on the 1970s and early 1980s. The records consist of agendas and minutes, charters, correspondence and memoranda, resolutions and statutes, reports, studies, financial material, photographs, newspaper clippings and other printed matter.

The ASDU records provide insight into student life during a time when students were becoming more active in university affairs. The collection is useful in examining issues that were important to students in the 1970s and 1980s such as divestment in South Africa, financial aid and campus race relations and the actions taken on those issues; how effective student government was during this period; and also illuminates student organizations at Duke at this time -- both what they were and what they did. The records also demonstrate some of the services provided to students by ASDU: the Bail Loan Fund; Legal assistance; van/shuttle services; and the distribution of the Student Activities fee.

Additional ASDU records can be found inter-filed with Duke Student Government records. Please contact University Archives for additional information.

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The Duke Vigil was a peaceful demonstration, sparked by the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., that occurred at Duke University in April 1968. The Vigil involved students, faculty, and non-academic employees of the university and called for racial equality and improved wages for hourly workers. Barry Sharoff organized publicity for the Duke Vigil Strategy Committee. The collection includes fliers, newspapers, press releases, statements, notes, correspondence, and publicly distributed materials regarding the Duke Vigil gathered by Barry Sharoff in his role in charge of publicity for the Vigil, as well as materials related to the 20th anniversary of the Vigil in 1988.

The collection includes fliers, newspapers, press releases, statements, notes, correspondence, and publicly distributed materials regarding the Duke Vigil gathered by Barry Sharoff in his role in charge of publicity for the Vigil.

Included are a number of fliers for Vigil activities, particularly meetings and boycotts; statements and press releases, including statements from Board of Trustees Chair Wright Tisdale, the general faculty, and the Special Trustee-Administrative Committee, and press releases from campus radio WDBS and the Office of Information Services; Barry Sharoff's notes on publicity and organizing efforts; a list of Vigil participants; newspapers, especially the Chronicle, featuring articles on the Vigil; and materials related to the 20th anniversary of the Duke Vigil, celebrated during the 1988 20th reunion of the Class of 1968.

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The Black History at Duke Reference Collection chronicles the integration of Duke University. This history includes the Silent Vigil; the Allen Building Takeover; the creation of a Black Student Alliance; the development of a Black Studies Program; interactions between the university and the Durham community; as well as individual efforts from students, faculty, and administrators. The collection contains publications, fliers, reports, memos, handbooks, manuals, lists, clippings, and a bibliography. Major subjects include black students, civil rights demonstrations, and the effects of desegregation on administrative policies. English.

The collection contains publications, fliers, reports, memos, handbooks, manuals, lists, clippings, and a bibliography. The collection is divided into six series: The End of Segregation, Black Faculty, Black Studies Program, Student Groups, Public Forums, and Clippings.

The first series, The End of Segregation, includes a bibliography, background materials about desegregation efforts, statistics, reports, and memos. The second series, Black Faculty, includes clippings, and a list of black professors, assistant professors, lecturers, non-tenure track instructors, graduate teaching and research assistants. The appendix to the list includes the Medical School and School of Nursing faculty.

In 1968, there were discussions on campus about establishing a black studies or Afro-American studies program, but no action was taken by the university. One of the demands of the students who took over the Allen Building on Feb. 13, 1969, was for the establishment of a fully accredited department of Afro-American Studies. On May 2, 1969, the Black Studies Committee submitted a proposal to the Undergraduate Faculty Council of the Arts and Sciences for the creation of the Black Studies Program and the courses were approved by the curriculum committee. Walter Burford was named program head in 1970. The third series, Black Studies Program, chronicles some of the history of this program and includes drafts of proposals, enrollment statistics, flyers, photocopies of clippings, and other materials.

The fourth series, Student Groups, contains materials from a variety of groups. Included are: the Afro-American Society, the Association of African Students, the Black Student Alliance, the Black Graduate and Professional Student Association, Black Fraternities and Sororities, and others. The fifth series, Public Forums, includes materials on a number of speakers, rallies, demonstrations, boycotts; one newspaper advertisement; and one Internet site. The sixth series, Clippings, contains mostly photocopies of newspaper articles. The clippings are from 1967-2001 and undated, and cover a wide variety of topics. Of note is a series of articles that appeared in the Chronicle, "Black and Blue: Blacks at Duke," Feb. 13-Feb.17, 1984.

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Black Student Alliance records, 1969-2019 1 Linear Foot — 387 Megabytes

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The Afro-American Society (now the Black Student Alliance) was established at Duke University in 1967, four years after the first Black undergraduates were admitted. The Afro-American Society was a social and activist group created to support students as they dealt with the challenges of Black life at a previously segregated institution. Contains fliers, memoranda, correspondence, printed e-mail, minutes, newsletters, reports, charts, a scrapbook, printed materials, and electronic records pertaining to the activities of the Black Student Alliance (BSA) and related Black and African American student groups at Duke University from 1969-2019.

Contains fliers, memoranda, correspondence, printed e-mail, minutes, newsletters, reports, charts, a scrapbook, printed materials, and electronic records pertaining to the activities of the Black Student Alliance and related Black and African American student groups at Duke University from 1969-2019. Forms part of the University Archives at Duke University.

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The Commission on University Governance at Duke University was created in April 1969 by Chancellor pro tem Barnes Woodhall. The group was charged with studying changes in university organization nationwide to create a model for administration at Duke. The group also focused on increasing student participation in university governance. The records include minutes, memoranda, correspondence, and reports produced by the Commission on University Governance, as well as reports, clippings, and other printed matter gathered by the Commission for reference purposes. The Commission published its findings and recommendations in three "Interim Reports," concerning the Board of Trustees, the Central Administration, and Departmental Governance. English.

The records of the Commission on University Governance span the years 1969 to 1971, with most of the material dating from 1969-1970 academic year. The collection is organized into two series: materials created by the Commission, and materials collected by the Commission.

The records generated by the Commission on University Governance consist primarily of minutes and transcripts of its official meetings, including supplementary materials distributed for discussion at these meetings. Typed transcript drafts exist for meetings 1 through 19, and this series contains minutes for all 34 meetings. Also included in this series are two copies of each of the Commission's three Interim Reports (Board of Trustees, Central Administration, and Departmental Governance), as well as drafts of these reports. Other official Commission records include information on the Commission's members and clippings from the Chronicle, Durham Morning Herald, and Durham Sun dated September 30, 1969 to April 16, 1970 concerning the work of the Commission. Correspondence not included with Commission minutes is divided into two folders: 1) letters dated April to September 1969, all regarding the establishment of the Commission, and 2) official correspondence dated after that time, including a January 1970 introduction to the Commission's activities for new Duke President Terry Sanford and a January 1971 response to the Commission's Interim Reports from the Provost.

The Commission on University Governance amassed a significant collection of reference materials for use in formulating its reports, which are roughly arranged into subseries. It appears that members of the Commission twice attempted to catalog and collate these materials, as two indexes entitled "Materials on Hand" and "Table of Contents" are a part of this series. However, neither index is accompanied by a complete set of the materials listed on it. To preserve original order, the sections of listed materials that are present have been identified and retained, even when they duplicate each other. Printed matter that was not a part of either of these subseries falls into two categories: reports and other matter from Duke committees, schools, and organizations, and printed matter that was created by other universities and organizations. This series also contains several bibliographies, arranged both by subject and by format, as well as periodical abstracts, alphabetized by author, donated to the Commission from the Special Committee on Student Residential Life. Also present in this series are the complete minutes of the Chancellor's Advisory Committee, known as the Committee of Twelve, which met nineteen times between October 1969 and March 1970, when it was disbanded.

University Archives also has catalogued copies of the Commission's three Interim Reports: Board of Trustees - 378.756 D877CTR Central Administration - 378.756 D877CGO Departmental Governance - 378.756 D877CDG

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The Dept. of African and African American Studies collection contains the office files of department directors Walter Burford and William Turner. Materials and topics in the collection include course materials for courses taught under the aegis of Black Studies' instructors; the large efforts channeled into recruitment of full-time faculty for the program; committee work related to Black Studies proposals and to the program's departmental status; budgets; and printed matter relating to similar programs and problems at other schools. The materials date from 1966-1981.

Collection contains the office files of the Director of African and African American Studies. Materials and topics in the collection include course materials for courses taught under the aegis of Black Studies' instructors; the large efforts channeled into recruitment of full-time faculty for the program; committee work related to Black Studies proposals and to the program's departmental status; budgets; information concerning similar programs and problems at other schools; and printed material received by the office which gives something of the flavor of minority affairs and resources around the country. Two 7-inch magnetic tape reels are also present documenting the 1972 Black Religion Symposium. The materials date from 1966-1981.

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Duke Student Government records, 1960-2019 28 Linear Feet — 0.44 Gigabytes

The Duke Student Government (DSG) replaced the existing student government, Associated Students of Duke University (ASDU), in 1993. DSG is the governing body of Duke undergraduate students and acts as the principal liaison between them and the University administration. It presents students' views on the affairs of the University community, appoints students to University and Board of Trustees committees, and oversees and allocates funds to student clubs and organizations. The Duke Student Government Records, 1960-2007, contain materials of both the DSG its organizational predecessor, Associated Students of Duke University (ASDU). Records consist of correspondence, legislation, minutes, reports, printed matter, judicial decisions, charters, memoranda, speeches, receipts, vouchers, and other materials, and document student governance and political activity, organizations, events planning, housing, and interaction with Duke University administration and the Board of Trustees.

The Duke Student Government Records, 1960-2019, contain materials of both the Duke Student Government (DSG, formed in 1993), and its organizational predecessor, the Associated Students of Duke University (ASDU, formed in 1967). Records consist of correspondence, legislation, minutes, reports, printed matter, judicial decisions, charters, memoranda, speeches, receipts, vouchers, and other materials. The collection documents a broad spectrum of student social life, including student governance and political activity, organizations, events planning, housing, and interaction with Duke University administrative officers, offices, and the Board of Trustees.

Arranged in order by accession number, except that in all cases Board of Trustees materials have been transferred to the Board of Trustees Series, housed at the end of the collection.

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The Duke Student Government Reference Collection contains files of clippings, articles, printouts, publications, and other materials about student participation in univerity administration through Duke Student Government. Topics include alcohol, elections, off-campus housing, proposals and resolutions, and presidents and officers. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.