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Collection
Adelaide Johnson, 1859-1955, was a suffragist, artist, and sculptor. Her original name was Sarah Adeline Johnson; she changed her name to Adelaide in 1878. Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

Collection
Collection contains approximately 50 letters, largely congratulatory, mailed to Jeannette Rankin following her congressional vote opposing the United States' declaration of war on Germany in 1917. Many letters discuss women's suffrage and the desire for peace. Collection also includes assorted materials from Jeannette's lecture tours in New York, including itemized statements from a New York advertising agency and a promotional flyer. There is blank stationary letterhead from her second congressional term. Also includes two letters from Rankin's mother, Olive Pickering Rankin, to her brother, Wellington; these are undated but appear to be from approximately 1917-1920s.

Collection contains approximately 50 letters, largely congratulatory, mailed to Jeannette Rankin following her congressional vote opposing the United States' declaration of war on Germany in 1917. These letters are from strangers and non-constituents, largely women; most discuss woman's suffrage and the desire for peace, and applaud Jeannette Rankin's bravery for voting her conscience.

Collection also includes assorted materials from Rankin's lecture tours in New York, including itemized statements from a New York advertising agency in 1917, and a promotional flyer with an image of Jeannette Rankin from 1933. There is blank stationary letterhead from her second congressional term.

Finally, the collection also includes two letters from Rankin's mother, Olive Pickering Rankin, to her brother, Wellington Rankin; these are undated but appear to be from approximately 1917-1920s. Olive Rankin discusses her immense dislike of Washington D.C., and her dislike of the people (including suffragist Cornelia Swinnerton) she has met there. One quote from the August 27 (year not included in the letter, although perhaps 1917): "I stay here because I know I am needed though perhaps Jeannette would rather I would not. She has a peculiar liking for a set of New Yorkers. Miss Craft, Miss Swinnerton, and others who would run the house if I were not here. They think with a few jewels and an immense amount of flattery they can own Jeannette, but I have a prior claim. Truly Wellington if you knew the people they would disgust you especially Swinny I think of swine whenever I look at her."

Collection
Collection comprises a stannotype photograph showing five female suffragists standing in a row. One woman holds a banner from the Equal Suffrage League of St. Louis, Mo. Another has a "Votes for Women" sticker on a suitcase at her feet.
Collection
Collection contains two letters Susan B. Anthony wrote on National American Woman Suffrage Association letterhead in February 1905 to Minnie C. Rodey, who was chair of the "Women's Club" in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In the letters, Anthony described informational material she will be sending Rodey, including a history of woman suffrage. In addition, she recommended a process by which the territory would vote on the issue of woman's suffrage before it acquiring statehood, since she considered the legislature and governor more likely to pass it than the general male voters in the state. She added, "... I read yesterday of the number of Indians and Mexicans and negroes that were in the territories. It is amazing that people want to make a state out of a territory composed of a majority of what we should term 'incompetents' Voting should be confined to intelligent beings." She also inquired of mutual friends and recommends her relatives who are visiting Albuquerque.

Collection contains two letters Susan B. Anthony wrote on National American Woman Suffrage Association letterhead in February 1905 to Minnie C. Rodey, who was chair of the "Women's Club" in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In the letters, Anthony described informational material she will be sending Rodey, including a history of woman suffrage. In addition, she recommended a process by which the territory would vote on the issue of woman's suffrage before it acquiring statehood, since she considered the legislature and governor more likely to pass it than the general male voters in the state. She added, "... I read yesterday of the number of Indians and Mexicans and negroes that were in the territories. It is amazing that people want to make a state out of a territory composed of a majority of what we should term 'incompetents' Voting should be confined to intelligent beings." She also inquired of mutual friends and recommends her relatives who are visiting Albuquerque. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Collection comprises a letter Susan B. Anthony composed to "Friend Campbell" (Cornelius Bowman Campbell), discussing arrangements for her and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to meet with him and outlining potential discussion of "our political proclivities." Written on letterhead for THE REVOLUTION.

Collection comprises a letter Susan B. Anthony composed to "Friend Campbell" (Cornelius Bowman Campbell), discussing arrangements for her and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to meet with him and outlining potential discussion of "our political proclivities." Written on letterhead for THE REVOLUTION. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.