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Collection
Benjamin Newton Duke (1855-1929) was a tobacco manufacturer, industrialist, and philanthropist of Durham, NC and New York, NY and a trustee and major benefactor of Trinity College (later Duke University). He was the son of Washington Duke, older brother of James B. Duke, husband of Sarah Pearson Angier Duke, and father of Angier Buchanan Duke and Mary Duke Biddle. The materials in this collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries in North Carolina and New York and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr., series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

The papers of Benjamin Newton Duke have been collected from various sources over time and span the years 1834 to 1969, although the bulk of the material dates from 1890 to 1929. The materials in the collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family in Durham, NC and New York, NY, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. Types of material in the collection include correspondence, financial statements and ledgers, bills and receipts, architectural blueprints and drawings, land plats, deeds, photographs, photograph albums, scrapbooks, and a diary.

Family members represented include Sarah P. Duke, Angier Buchanan Duke, Mary Duke Biddle, Washington Duke, James B. Duke, Brodie L. Duke, Lida Duke Angier, and Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr. Other individuals represented include Julian S. Carr, William A. Erwin, John C. Kilgo, William P. Few, Daniel Lindsay Russell, James E. Shepard, and George W. Watts.

The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr. series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

Collection

Bob Sheldon papers, 1968-1991 2.1 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Political activist; nurse; owner of Internationalist Book Store in Chapel Hill, N.C. Sheldon was murdered in the store on February 21, 1991. Drafts of Sheldon's speeches, articles, diary and notes; news clippings; printed materials; and transcripts of trials and FBI files. Materials relate chiefly to his political activism as a draft resister in 1968; a visit to China in the 1970s, including slides; work with the Communist Workers Party in the 1970s and the Green Party in the 1980s; union organizing at Cone Mills Textile plant in the 1970s; and various Palestine issues in the 1980s.

Drafts of Sheldon's speeches, articles, diary and notes; news clippings; printed materials; and transcripts of trials and FBI files. Materials relate chiefly to his political activism as a draft resister in 1968; a visit to China in the 1970s, including slides; work with the Communist Workers Party in the 1970s and the Green Party in the 1980s; union organizing at Cone Mills Textile plant in the 1970s; and various Palestine issues in the 1980s.

Collection
Labor leader from Willingboro (Burlington Co.), N.J. Papers concerning the career of Boyd Ellsworth Payton, International Vice President of the Textile Workers Union of America. The papers concern three major aspects of Payton's career: the Harriet-Henderson Cotton Mills strike (1958-1961); his incarceration and writing of the book, Scapegoat; and finally his experiences after being released from prison. Included are genealogical materials, correspondence, legal papers, addresses and writings, miscellaneous items, radio scripts, pictures, and a draft of Scapegoat, entitled Prejudice + Politics = Prison. Other papers include items on the poll tax in the South, as well as pamphlets relating to labor unions and the South, the poll tax, and strikes. Clippings deal principally with the American Federation of Labor (AFL), AFL publicity, South Carolina Federation of Labor Convention, United Textile Workers of America convention, communists, and the Bessemer City strike. A 1929 scrapbook houses clippings pertaining to the southern textile strike in that year, and a 1946 scrapbook contains information on the Danville (Va.) Citizens' Committee, a group organized to fight inflation and high prices in Danville. Formerly part of the Labor Archives Collection. Original box numbers have been retained.

Papers date from 1929 to 1977 and concern the career of Boyd Ellsworth Payton, International Vice President of the Textile Workers Union of America. The papers concern three major aspects of Payton's career: the Harriet-Henderson Cotton Mills strike (1958-1961); his incarceration in prison and writing of the book, Scapegoat; and finally his experiences after being released from jail. Included are genealogical materials, correspondence, legal papers, addresses and writings, miscellaneous items, radio scripts, pictures, and a draft of Scapegoat, entitled "Prejudice + Politics = Prison." Other papers include items on the poll tax in the South, as well as pamphlets relating to labor unions and the South, the poll tax, and strikes. Clippings deal principally with the American Federation of Labor (AFL), AFL publicity, South Carolina Federation of Labor Convention, United Textile Workers of America convention, communists, and the Bessemer City strike. A 1929 scrapbook houses clippings pertaining to the southern textile strike in that year, and a 1946 scrapbook contains information on the Danville (Va.) Citizens' Committee, a group organized to fight inflation and high prices in Danville. One box of material was formerly part of the Labor Archives Collection. Original box number has been retained.

Collection

Daniel Augustus Tompkins papers, 1774-1976 11 Linear Feet — 6432 Items

Engineer, author, and entrepreneur, of Charlotte (Mecklenburg Co.), N.C. Collection contains letters and papers relating to Tompkins' work in the Pennsylvania steel industry, specifically with the Bethlehem Iron Works, his career as an industrial engineer in North Carolina with the Westinghouse Machine Company, his personal life, his activities as co-owner of the Charlotte Observer and his disputes with the editor, J. C. Hemphill, his patents and inventions, his business activities and involvement with the textile, brick, and other industries, and the settlement of his estate. Includes ledgers and a stockholders' minute book of the D. A. Tompkins Company.

Collection consists of personal, business, legal, and financial papers of Daniel Augustus Tompkins (1851-1914), Charlotte businessman. Correspondence, 1874-1884, is principally with his fiancee, Harriet Brigham, discussing personal matters; his work and colleagues at the Bethlehem Iron Works, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, where Tompkins was employed as a machinist, 1874-1881; economic conditions relating to Bethlehem Iron Works; life in boarding houses; social and cultural life in Bethlehem; Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania; his organization of a savings and loan association; John Fritz, mechanical engineer at Bethlehem Iron Works; and his work as an engineer and sales agent in Charlotte, North Carolina, for the Westinghouse Machine Company.

A ledger, 1881-1886, contains accounts for public committees in Bethlehem including fire, street, lock-up, lamp, health, police, ordinance, finance, and market; and accounts, 1883-1884, for selling steam engines for the Westinghouse Machine Company. Scattered papers, 1884-1914, generally pertain to Tompkins's investments, and to his dispute over editorial policies with James Calvin Hemphill, editor of the Charlotte Observer, in which Tompkins owned a majority interest.

Included are a cashbook, 1913-1914; notes and bills receivable and payable, 1889-1918; notes, 1906-1907, about gas engines; a journal, 1910-1914; and a ledger, 1907-1914.

Papers, 1915-1921, consisting of correspondence, legal and financial papers, scattered minutes, and financial statements, generally relate to the settlement of the Tompkins estate and his investments in the Charlotte Observer; the Observer Printing House; the Greenville (S.C.) News; the Atherton Mills of which Tompkins was a founder; the High Shoals Company; other cotton mills in North and South Carolina, especially Parker Cotton Mills Company, Victor-Monaghan Mills, Hampton Cotton Mills and Issaqueena Mills; the Troy Oil Mill; the D. A. Tompkins Company, manufacturers, engineers, and contractors with machine and roller covering shops; the Switzerland Company, developers of the resort community of Little Switzerland, North Carolina; the Charlotte Sanatorium, a general hospital; banking investments; and the Johnson Publishing Company.

There are also correspondence and other papers dealing with the writing of a biography of Daniel Augustus Tompkins by George Tayloe Winston entitled A Builder of the New South: Being the Story of the Life Work of Daniel Augustus Tompkins (New York: 1920); and with bequests to Edgefield, South Carolina, for their library and for the installation of manual training and home economics in the public schools.

Accounts for the estate consist of a journal, 1914-1926; cashbooks, 1914-1926; and a trial balances book, 1913-1918. There are also accounts for the D. A. Tompkins Company including a cashbook, 1907-1917; a ledger, 1907-1917; and a minute book, 1906-1916. Accounts for the Troy Oil Mill Company are a cashbook, 1914-1917; a general ledger, 1905-1917; and a ledger, 1914-1916.

Papers after 1921 are chiefly those of Sterling Graydon (d. 1974), nephew of Daniel Augustus Tompkins, executor of the Tompkins estate, and owner of the Angus Brick Company, Ninety Six, South Carolina. Included are personal correspondence of Graydon and of his wife, Nell (Saunders) Graydon, concerning family matters, politics, economic conditions, the management of the Tompkins estate, and Graydon's ownership of the Angus Brick Company; papers relating to Graydon's stock investments, especially during the 1950s; papers dealing with Nell (Saunders) Graydon's historical writings on South Carolina; information on the Cokesbury (South Carolina) Historical Commission and the campaign to preserve the town; accounts relating to the Angus Brick Company, consisting of ledgers, 1930-1945, and cash journals, 1934-1945; a personal cash journal of Sterling Graydon, 1930-1948; and a ledger of Clint T. Graydon, 1930-1935.

The collection also contains printed material and pictures.

Description taken from: Guide to the Cataloged Collections in the Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University (1980)

Collection

Don Roy papers, 1921 - 1980 25.5 Linear Feet

Donald Francis Roy (1909-1980), noted industrial sociologist, was a faculty member at Duke University in the Department of Sociology from 1950 until his retirement in 1979. Roy's areas of specialization were field methods of sociological research and social conflict. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, reviews, manuscripts, research and field notes, reprints, newsletters, photographs, teaching materials, pamphlets, and other written materials. The major subjects of the collection are Roy's study of industrial sociology; workplace interactions; and specific collective bargaining and union campaigns of the Textile Workers Union of America, the Teamsters Union, and the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees. English.

The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, reviews, manuscripts, research and field notes, reprints, newsletters, photographs, teaching materials, pamphlets, and other written materials. The major subjects of the collection are Roy's study of industrial sociology; workplace interactions; and specific collective bargaining and union campaigns of the Textile Workers Union of America, the Teamsters Union, and the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees.

While at Duke, Roy studied the attempts made by the Textile Workers Union of America to have union contracts accepted in some of the mills of Virginia and North Carolina. Between 1956-1959 and 1973-1979, Roy made detailed observations on the campaigns at the Hanes Knitting Company in Winston-Salem, N.C., 1956-1957; Elkin, N.C., 1956-1957; Chatham, Va., 1956; Burlington, N.C., 1957; Roanoke, Va., 1956 and 1965; Radford, Va., 1957; Vinton, Va., 1957; Dublin, Va., 1957; Altavista, Va., 1957; Henderson, N.C., 1958-1959; Roanoke Rapids, N.C., 1964-1979; Wallace, N.C., 1974 and 1977; Laurinburg, N.C., 1977-1979. The bulk of the information about these campaigns can be found in Boxes 1-5 and Boxes 14-19. Manuscripts on the Sheffield and Tyndall campaigns can be found in Box 1.

In addition, Roy followed the disputes involving the Teamsters Union in Atlanta, Ga., 1966, and the attempt by Local 77 of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees to establish a union at Duke Hospital in the 1960s and 1970s. Throughout his life, Roy took detailed field notes, collected materials, and retained correspondence about his industrial studies. These materials are scattered throughout the collection.

In 1965-1966, Roy spent a year on sabbatical at Cornell University. During that year, Roy wrote case studies on the Tyndall Garment Co., the Sheffield and Laurel Campaigns, the Burlington Campaign, the Corinth Study, and the Labor Organizing Campaign. Roy's field notes and observations are included in the collection.

Roy used pseudonyms, to protect confidentiality, for the names of the people and places he studied. Box 14 contains a list of the pseudonyms Roy used in his case studies. The following list gives the actual name followed by the pseudonym used by Roy in some of his studies and in his folder titles.

Missing Title
Hanes Knitting
Tyndall Garments
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Lancaster
Elkin, N.C.
Laurel
Chatham, Va.
Sheffield
Burlington, N.C.
Jefferson
Roanoke, Va.
Statesboro
Radford, Va.
Zebulon
Vinton, Va.
Corinth
Dublin, Va.
Indian Hills
Altavista, Va.
Cartersville
Roanoke Rapids, N.C.
Clearwater

Box 6 contains files for a book begun by Roy about his interest and involvement in union organizing. The book was not completed. The collection file contains Mrs. Roy's outline of the book's organization.

The collection file includes a paper by Huw Beynon with notes and comments about Roy's papers. Beynon's manuscript offers a proposed classification for the collection and outlines themes of Roy's work. The collection file also includes a biographical sketch by Dr. Joy K. Roy, Roy's second wife.

Collection
Durham Cotton Manufacturing Company founded, 1884 by J. A., J. M., and W. R. Odell, W. H. Branson, and Julian S. Carr. Headquarters in Durham, N.C. Dissolved, 1940. Letterpress copybooks, invoices, cancelled checks, check stubs, receipt books, and invoices and accounts from Joshua L. Baily and Co., Philadelphia brokers who sold goods for the company. Most of the material represents the years 1915-1934. Includes information on fluctuations in cotton prices, export trade in cotton cloth, types of cloth and machinery, freight rates, salaries, workers' medical care, tenement rents, stockholders, dividends, and distribution of excess profits.

Letterpress copybooks, invoices, cancelled checks, check stubs, receipt books, and invoices and accounts from Joshua L. Baily and Co., Philadelphia brokers who sold goods for the Durham Cotton Manufacturing Company, headquartered in Durham, N.C. Most of the material represents the years 1915-1934. Includes information on fluctuations in cotton prices, export trade in cotton cloth, types of cloth and machinery, freight rates, salaries, workers' medical care, tenement rents, stockholders, dividends, and distribution of excess profits.

Collection
Collection comprises letters, bills, time books, ledgers, check stubs, inventories, broadsides, stock certificates, dye house records, and other materials. The bulk of the letters, 1895-1897, date to George M. Graham's service as secretary and treasurer of the Durham Hosiery Company, as do many of the volumes. Topics include machinery and supplies purchased from firms in the North, newly organized textile mills in the South, the installation and repair of machinery, the sale of hosiery, the purchase of yarn, wages offered, and the hiring of laborers.

Collection comprises records, letters, bills, time books, ledgers, check stubs, inventories, broadsides, stock certificates, dye house records, letterbooks, accounts of loopers, cash books, and express books. The bulk of the letters, 1895-1897, date to George M. Graham's service as secretary and treasurer of the Durham Hosiery Company, as do many of the volumes. Topics include machinery and supplies purchased from firms in the North, newly organized textile mills in the South, the installation and repair of machinery, the sale of hosiery, the purchase of yarn, wages offered, and the hiring of laborers. Southern textile mills mentioned include the Raleigh Cotton Mills, the Eden Park Cotton Mill of Atlanta, Ga., the McCall Manufacturing Co. of McCall, S.C., the Eno Cotton Mills of Hillsboro, N.C.; the Mayo Mills of Mayodan, N.C., the Clover Cotton Manfacturing Co. of Clover, S.C., and the Kerr Thread Company of Atlanta, Ga.

Collection
James B. Duke (1856-1925) was a tobacco manufacturer, industrialist, and philanthropist of Durham, North Carolina, and New York City and the youngest son of Washington Duke. He was also father to Doris Duke, who inherited a considerable portion of her father's estate at an early age and became known as "the richest girl in the world." James B. Duke's major business concerns included W. Duke, Sons and Company; American Tobacco Company; British American Tobacco Company; and Southern Power Company. His philanthropic activities included endowments of Trinity College (later renamed Duke University) and Lincoln Hospital of Durham, North Carolina. In December 1924, Duke established the Duke Endowment, a permanent trust fund whose beneficiaries include Duke University and three other institutions of higher education, rural churches, non-profit hospitals, and child care institutions throughout North and South Carolina. The collection was compiled from various sources and includes: correspondence; business, legal, and financial papers; estate and inheritance records; printed materials; miscellaneous materials; architectural drawings and blueprints; and pictures chiefly relating to the businesses, enterprises and philanthropy of James Buchanan Duke in North Carolina, South Carolina, New York, New Jersey, and Québec, Canada. About one-half of the collection documents the administration of his estate. Subject areas represented include: American Tobacco Company; British American Tobacco Company; Southern Power Company; business; finance; aspects of the tobacco industry, including automation, marketing and taxation; hydroelectric power; textile mills; charitable works; architectural planning and interior decoration; genealogy of branches of the Duke family; inheritance and succession; estate taxation; and legal procedure for wills, inheritance and business.

The papers of James Buchanan Duke have been collected from various sources over time and span the years 1777 to 1999, although the bulk of the material dates from the 1890s to the mid-1930s. The collection is divided into 7 series: Correspondence, Business Papers, Legal Papers, Financial Papers, Estate Papers, Miscellaneous, and Pictures. About one half of the collection documents the administration of the Estate of James B. Duke, Deceased, including legal proceedings stemming from claims made against the estate. The remainder of the collection deals largely with businesses and financial investments, mainly through the Business Papers, Financial Papers, and Estate Papers Series. To a lesser extent, aspects of Duke's philanthropy are documented through the Financial Papers, Correspondence, and Legal Papers, while personal topics are concentrated in the Picture Series, Miscellaneous Series, and Correspondence Series. Subject areas represented in the collection include: the tobacco and hydroelectric power industries; business and finance; philanthropy; genealogy on branches of the Duke family; inheritance; legal procedure; architecture and interior decoration; and, to a lesser degree, family life.

Since brother Benjamin Newton Duke participated in many of the same businesses and enterprises as James B. Duke, items of his business correspondence and documents related to his investments and domestic expenditures are also found throughout the collection.

Collection

Jonathan E. Cox papers, 1885-1938 and undated 30 Linear Feet — Approximately 46,057 Items

Banker and manufacturer of High Point, N.C. May have been a Quaker. The Jonathan E. Cox Papers chiefly consist of the business records of a banker and manufacturer from High Point, North Carolina. Records date from 1885-1938 and include many boxes of business and personal correspondence, chiefly letters to Cox; and a series of manuscript volumes, including journals, daybooks, order books, trial balance books, ledgers, profit-and-loss accounts, bill books, inventory records, rent book, check stubs, mill contracts, a letter book, and an account book of Joseph D. Cox. There are few personal items, but there is some biographical information on Cox's daughter, Clara I. Cox, a Quaker also living in High Point, who was active in civic and humanitarian affairs in that city.

The Jonathan E. Cox Papers chiefly consist of the business records of a banker and manufacturer from High Point, North Carolina. Records date from 1885-1938 and include many boxes of business and personal correspondence, chiefly to Cox from suppliers, builders, creditors, and manufacturers; and a series of manuscript volumes, including journals, daybooks, order books, trial balance books, ledgers, profit-and-loss accounts, bill books, inventory records, rent book, check stubs, mill contracts, a letter book, and an account book of Joseph D. Cox. Business topics in the manuscripts and correspondence include banks and banking, insurance, textile industry, lumber trade, shipping, and the mercantile business. There are few personal items, but there is some biographical information on Cox's daughter, Clara I. Cox, a Quaker also living in High Point, who was active in civic and humanitarian affairs in that city. There is significant political correspondence, chiefly for 1908, when Cox was an unsuccessful candidate on the Republican ticket for governor of North Carolina. Among other subjects represented are universities and colleges (Guilford and Peabody, later part of Vanderbilt University), North Carolina roads, and American participation in World War I. Records are arranged in chronological order with the exception of the last three boxes, which contain the earliest material. Manuscript volumes are housed separately.

Collection

Mooresville Mills records, 1893-1962 and undated 20.4 Linear Feet — 15,290 Items

Manufacturer of cotton, wool, and synthetic fabrics, originally located in Mooresville, NC. Correspondence, minutes of meetings of stockholders and of directors, audit reports, financial statements, stock records, and general and subsidiary account books of a Mooresville, N.C., manufacturer of cotton, wool, and synthetic fabrics, draperies, upholstery, toweling, and wearing apparel, which was absorbed by Burlington Industries in 1955.

Records of a firm established in 1893 as Mooresville Cotton Mills by J. E. Sherrill and others, and later becoming a manufacturer of cotton, wool, and synthetic fabrics, draperies, upholstery, toweling, and clothing. The firm was absorbed by Burlington Industries in 1955. Included is a "historical file" of printed and typed articles; selected documents, 1914-1935, containing financial data; and photographs of employees, offices, and aerial photographs of the plant. There are also some legal documents relating to the firm's charter, receivership, and bylaws.

There are extensive minutes, 1893-1955, 3 vols., of meetings of stockholders and the board of directors; minutes, 1936-1951, of the executive committee of the board of directors; audit reports, 1921-1954; and financial statements, 1932-1933, 1937-1955. Stock records include common stock ledgers, 1893-1923, 5 vols.; a preferred stock ledger, 1917-1923; stock lists and miscellaneous records, 1897-1955; preferred stock certificates, 1917-1942; common stock certificates, 1893-1955; bonds for lost certificates, 1946-1955; broadsides for the issuance of preferred stock, 1923, and for a renewal, 1926. Appraisals of the corporation are dated 1935, 1946, and 1948. Account books include a journal and ledger, 1914-1916; cashbooks, 1905-1909, 2 vols.; cash journals, 1912-1913, 1921-1926, 3 vols.; check and deposit registers, 1948-1954, 3 vols.; cloth and towel inventories, 1936-1942, 1948-1949, 9 vols.; and a cost ledger, 1954. Unbound accounting records include inventories, 1933-1939, 1960-1962; local, state, and federal tax records, 1893-1956; and construction contracts and records, 1958-1960. There is also fragmentary correspondence, 1952-1955, for the towel division, the decorative fabrics division, the apparel fabrics division, and for William J. Fullerton who held various offices principally in merchandising and sales. For online images of the mill complex and its related mill village, see this website sponsored by the mill village association: Mooresville Mill slideshow.