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The purpose of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is to advance academic freedom and shared governance, to define fundamental professional values and standards for higher education, and to ensure higher education's contribution to the common good. The collection includes correspondence, reports, proceedings, memoranda, and other materials of the American Association of University Professors from the period when Duke University faculty member William T. Laprade was chairman of its Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure (1937-1942, 1948-1953), and president (1942-1943). A sample of the folders shows material concerning academic freedom cases, dismissals, quality of educational support and other matters of concern to the organization's membership. English.

Correspondence, reports, proceedings, memoranda, and other materials of the AAUP from the period when Duke University faculty member William T. Laprade was chairman of its Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure (1937-1942, 1948-1953), and president (1942-1943). A sample of the folders shows material concerning academic freedom cases, dismissals, quality of educational support and other matters of concern to the organization's membership. Series 1 consists of correspondence relating to concerns expressed to the Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure (Committee A), along with a few reports. Series 2 is made up of the Proceedings noted below. Series 3 appears to be the correspondence files from the office of the Association's President, but there are no folder titles and no apparent order.

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Boatman Family papers, 1901-1981 and undated 72 Linear Feet — 8620 Items

Methodist educators and family members from Kentucky and Alabama. The Boatman Family Papers span the years 1901-1981; the majority of the papers were generated by the Rev. Dr. Conway and Mrs. Caroline Boatman, Methodist educators from Kentucky. The collection is arranged in series by family member and institution, the most substantial series being the Conway and Caroline Boatman Series; the John Paul Boatman Series; and the Union College Series. Other smaller groups pertain to other family members. Family correspondence makes up the majority of the collection, but there are also scrapbooks; educational records (primarily financial); many photographs of Union College in Barbourville, Kentucky; and clippings and other printed items. Topics covered by the correspondence in the Conway and Caroline's papers cover their courtship (1909-1919); the Methodist Episcopal mission in Jubbulpore, India (1919-1923); and India Methodist Theological College (1923-1925). There are also many references to the three institutions where Dr. Boatman served as President - Iowa National Bible Training School (1928-1931), Snead College in Boaz, Ala., and College of Barbourville, Ky. (1939-1959). Fund-raising, especially during the Depression, is a commonly recurring theme. Other letters from sons of the Boatmans refer to their college years from the 1930s-1940s. Institutions referred to here include Drew University, University of Kentucky in Lexington, and Southwestern College in Kansas.

The Boatman Family Papers span the years 1901-1981; the majority of the papers were generated by the Rev. Dr. Conway and Mrs. Caroline Boatman, Methodist educators from Kentucky. The collection is arranged in series by family member and institution, the most substantial series being the Conway and Caroline Boatman Series; the John Paul Boatman Series; and the Union College Series. Other smaller groups pertain to other family members. Family correspondence makes up the majority of the collection, but there are also scrapbooks; educational records (primarily financial); many photographs of Union College in Barbourville, Kentucky; and clippings and other printed items. Topics covered by the correspondence in the Conway and Caroline's papers cover their courtship (1909-1919); the Methodist Episcopal mission in Jubbulpore, India (1919-1923); and India Methodist Theological College (1923-1925). There are also many references to the three institutions where Dr. Boatman served as President - Iowa National Bible Training School (1928-1931), Snead College in Boaz, Ala., and College of Barbourville, Ky. (1939-1959). Fund-raising, especially during the Depression, is a commonly recurring theme. Other letters from sons of the Boatmans refer to their college years from the 1930s-1940s. Institutions referred to here include Drew University, University of Kentucky in Lexington, and Southwestern College in Kansas.

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Daniel C. Roper papers, 1860-1958 56 Linear Feet — circa 33,900 items

The Daniel C. Roper Papers, 1860-1958 (bulk 1933-1938), consist chiefly of professional and political correspondence, including telegrams and memoranda, but also include speeches, financial papers, clippings, invitations, legal papers, printed material, and pictures. The collection primarily documents Roper's term as Secretary of Commerce during the first administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In general the papers provide an inside look at this Democratic administration during the early depression years, as well as the relationships among business, government, and politics. In particular, Roper had close ties to people in the business community and was sympathetic to their concerns. In addition, the collection tracks the course of the New Deal in the Department of Commerce and the career of Roper not only as a United States government official in Roosevelt's cabinet but also as a progressive Democrat. However, there are some gaps in these professional files in that there is very little material pertaining to Roper's career prior to his appointment to the cabinet post. Also, files for 1931 are almost entirely missing, and cross-reference sheets in the collection prepared by Roper's staff appear to refer to a separate set of files missing from this collection. There is relatively little in the papers concerning Roper's personal life, except for financial papers.

Roper's tenure as Secretary of Commerce is primarily documented in the Alphabetical Series, which not only is the largest series but also forms the heart of the collection. His support of Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1932 presidential campaign probably helped him earn this cabinet appointment along with Roper's representation of the old Woodrow Wilson element in the Democratic Party. Roper set as a major task the development of mutual confidence, cooperation, and a closer relationship between business and government in order to bring about a recovery from the depression. Since he had been a tax expert and business consultant prior to becoming Secretary, this was a natural role for him. In fact in 1933 he had organized a Business Advisory and Planning Council for the Department of Commerce to advise the administration on the effect of the New Deal's proposals on business. After serving in the administration for almost six years, Roper resigned to return to private life.

The Alphabetical Series includes correspondence from a large number of prominent senators and congressmen, men in government service, businessmen, lawyers, judges, and New Deal figures. These include Bernard Baruch, James Byrnes, Patrick Callahan, James Cannon, Thomas Chadbourne, David Coker, Homer Cummings, Josephus Daniels, William Dodd, Ernest Draper, Robert Elbert, James Farley, John Garner, and W. Averell Harriman. Other correspondents are William Henry Harrison, Edward House, Louis Howe Cordell Hull, Clarence Hurrey, Jesse Jones, Hugh MacRae, William Gibbs McAdoo, George Milton, Robert Owen, Hollins Randolph, Lawrence Robert, L.S. Rowe, and John Humphrey Small. The Farley correspondence includes a run of first day covers, 1933-1938, while he was Postmaster General. Roper's interest in the stamps was piqued in part by the fact that he had been the First Assistant Postmaster General appointed by Woodrow Wilson. There are smaller amounts of correspondence with other New Deal figures, such as Harry Hopkins, Frances Perkins, and Harold Ickes.

Information on organizations and topics is scattered throughout the Alphabetical Series. They include aeronautics (in Aviation folder); American University; the Board of Education of the District of Columbia; commerce (in Foreign Trade folder); communication (radio and telegraph); financial federations, specifically The Community Chest of Washington, D.C.; the Democratic National Committee; the Democratic Party (in Politics folder); Duke University; the Export-Import Bank of Washington; and the Hindenburg accident. Others are the Freemasons (in Masons folder); Japanese Economic Mission to the United States; the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (also in Methodist Church and Mt. Vernon Place Church folders); the National Benefit Life Assurance Company; the National Recovery Administration; the Post Office Department; the presidential election of 1932 (in Politics folder); prohibition; religion and politics; Franklin D. Roosevelt; and temperance and liquor laws (in Liquor Control folder). Roper supported prohibition and in fact had served during the prohibition era as Commissioner of Internal Revenue in the Treasury Department, charged with enforcing liquor laws. There is information about agencies within or related to the Department of Commerce including the Business Advisory Council, the Bureau of the Census (in Census folder), the Bureau of Fisheries (in Fisheries folder), and the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce (in Foreign and Domestic folder). Other topics represented in the collection include the Boxing Bill; the Communications Group; the Inter-departmental Communications Committee (in Communications Committee folder), probably a precursor of the Federal Communications Commission; and a proposed National Advisory Council.

Roper's professional views are expressed in the Writings and Speeches Series primarily while he served as Commissioner of Internal Revenue and as Secretary of Commerce. The speeches address a number of domestic political and economic issues, including the relationship of business and government, government regulation, taxation, economic recovery from the depression, the U.S. Postal Service, and the role of government in society.

There is scant evidence in these papers relating to Roper's career other than that as Secretary of Commerce and his speeches as Commissioner of Internal Revenue. His autobiography, Fifty Years of Public Life in the Writings and Speeches Series, gives an overview of his career. There is some information on his career as the First Assistant Postmaster General in the Alphabetical Series in the Postmaster General file. In that series there is a little information in Internal Revenue Service folders about his resignation as Commissioner. In the Clippings Series there is documentation of his brief service as U.S. Minister to Canada in the summer of 1939. There is a scrapbook, "My Clippings of Their Majesties' Visit to Canada, 1939," and loose clippings pertaining to the visit.

Roper's personal life is not well documented in the collection except for his financial concerns as seen in the Financial Papers Series. The information in that series relates not only to the investments and bank accounts of Roper but to his wife Lou McKenzie Roper and their children. There is some additional information on the Ropers in the various Roper folders and in other scattered folders under various topics in the Alphabetical Series, and in the Legal Papers and Pictures in the Miscellaneous Series.

A photograph album entitled, "Sugar: Story in Pictures," concerning sugar growing in Santo Domingo appears in the Miscellaneous Series. In addition this series contains photographs of prominent statesmen and others, such as Bernard Baruch, the British Royal family, William Jennings Bryan, Grover Cleveland, Josephus Daniels, Averell Harriman, Harold Ickes, Eleanor Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson. An oil portrait of Roper is in the custody of the Special Collections Library. The Clippings Series includes scattered information on farming in South Carolina, especially cotton, African Americans, racial relations, tariffs, the presidential campaign of 1924 and William Gibbs McAdoo, and Roosevelt's cabinet.

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Purviance family papers, 1757-1932 3 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 2,363 items (includes 16 vols.)

This collection contains professional, business, personal and family correspondence and other papers of the related Purviance and Courtenay families of Baltimore, Md., and elsewhere. The collection pertains to Revolutionary War activities in Maryland, shipping and trade, Western lands, settlement of estates, Civil War veterans' activities, the Cuban independence movement, and other matters. Includes papers of John Henry Purviance, U.S. diplomat in Paris, concerning the Monroe Mission (1794), U.S. relations with Napoleon and the Revolutionary French Government; papers relating to the financial affairs of Elizabeth Isabella Purviance Courtenay; papers of Edward H. Courtenay, Sr., relating to his career at West Point, his later teaching duties there and at other colleges, and his investment activities; and letters of Edward H. Courtenay, Jr., written in Washington, D.C., during the Civil War, describing the city and political opinion there. Correspondents include Alexander Dallas Bache, George William Erving, John Graham, Gessner Harrison, Anthony Hart, William Homes McGuffey, William Maclay, George Mason, James Monroe, Abner Nash, Fulwar Skipwith, George Muirson Totten, Thomas Tudor Tucker, and John Vanderlyn.

The Purviance family papers contain professional and family correspondence and papers of two generations of the Purviance family and several generations of the Courtenay family, related through the marriage of Henry Courtenay and Elizabeth Isabella Purviance in 1811.

The early papers relate chiefly to Samuel Purviance (d. 1787), Baltimore merchant, and chairman of the Committee of Observation for Baltimore County, and consist of records that include the interrogation of Purviance by the Council of Safety for the failure of a plan by the Committee of Observation to capture Maryland governor Robert Eden; correspondence discussing British depredations on American shipping, the extension of the Mason-Dixon line, cession of western lands, complaints against the Vandalia and Indiana Land companies, sale of lands owned by Purviance on the Chillisquaque River near Sunbury (Pennsylvania), lands owned by George Washington on the Kanawha River, and proposed development of the James River Canal; scattered letters from his wife concerning family matters; and letters from his son, John Henry Purviance, regarding his supervision of his father's western lands.

The professional papers of John Henry Purviance, secretary and interpreter to the James Monroe mission, 1794-1796, and secretary of the legation in London, 1804-1810, include memoranda regarding official diplomatic transactions; accounts, 1795, of interviews between Monroe and Jean Debrie, member of the Committee of Public Safety concerning arbitration of the war between France and Great Britain, French suspicion of the Jay Treaty, and the offices of the French in negotiations pending between the United States and Algiers; an account of a conversation between Monroe and one Fulton discussing the efforts of one La Chaise to persuade France to take possession of Louisiana and Florida as a check on American expansion and as a means of luring Kentucky away from the confederation, and Monroe's attempts to strengthen the ties of western territories to the union by asking France to influence Spain to keep the Mississippi River open to American trade; memoranda, 1796, concerning the difficulties of obtaining cash for a draft sent Monroe by the U.S. Treasury; Monroe's outline of a speech to the French National Convention; rough draft of a note from Monroe to the French minister of foreign affairs, Charles Delacroix, pertaining to the Fauchet letter; from Fulwar Skipwith, American consul-general at Paris, regarding Pierre Louis Roederer and the ratification of the treaty of 1800 which concluded the XYZ affair; rough drafts, 1806, of articles by Monroe describing the relations between the United States, Great Britain, and France; copy of a letter from Joseph Lakanal to an unnamed royal personage urging him to assert himself as ruler of Spain; rumors among the French peasantry of the impending return of Napoleon and gossip current in diplomatic circles; document, 1815, of Bon Adrien Jeannot de Moncey, Duc de Conegliano, making recommendations concerning France's foreign policy; letter, 1817, from the minister of Brazil to the U.S. minister containing copies of the correspondence between himself and the Russian minister dealing with a question of diplomatic protocol; and correspondence concerning Purviance's administrative duties.

Items of a more personal nature include papers relating to the financial affairs of his sister, Elizabeth Isabella Purviance, and the claims of her guardian, David Stewart, against the British government for capture of his vessels; commonplace book, 1781, containing extracts from a tour through Great Britain, excerpts from poems, and a few accounts; account book, 1801-1809, of travel expenses in the United States and Europe; commonplace book of excerpts from poems; commonplace book, 1811-1834, containing a travel diary of England and France, expenses, and a discussion of French government; a diary, 1819, of his travels including his impressions of the BayonneBiarritz area noted in the course of a diplomatic mission to Spain; and a memorandum book, 1818, with daily entries regarding weather, correspondence with President Monroe, and personal and financial matters.

Papers of Edward H. Courtenay (d. 1853) include correspondence with his uncle, John Henry Purviance, discussing the former's work and activities at West Point; papers dealing with the settlement of the estate of his grandfather, Hercules Courtenay (d. 1816); correspondence of Edward H. Courtenay, Jr., while attending school in Geneva, New York; personal correspondence concerning family and financial affairs; and personal correspondence with his brother, David Courtenay, regarding dealings in stocks, especially those of the Erie Railroad Company and the Aetna Life Insurance Company.

Other papers of the Courtenay family include occasional records of the 1st Maryland Volunteers under Lieutenant Colonel N. T. Dushane; letters from Edward H. Courtenay, Jr., describing his work with the U.S. Coastal Survey, divided sentiment in Maryland during the Civil War, and Washington, D.C.; commissions, appointment and other military papers of Chauncey B. Reese and Henry Brewerton, husbands of Mary I. Courtenay and Sarah Courtenay, respectively, daughters of Edward H. Courtenay, Sr.; correspondence between David Courtenay and his son, William, regarding West Virginia lands which were a part of the Purviance estate, and the discovery of oil on those lands; papers relating to the administration of the estates of various members of the Courtenay family; business papers of William C. Courtenay; financial papers, principally in stock speculation, of several members of the family; financial records of the Maryland Society of the Sons of the American Revolution and of the 5th Maryland Regiment Veteran Corps; letter, 1869, from Edward H. Courtenay, Jr., discussing efforts of Cuba to free herself from Spain and the attitude of the United States towards such efforts, and commenting upon the treatment of Chinese immigrants in the United States; and papers concerning the disappearance and probable death of David S. Courtenay, son of Edward H. Courtenay, Sr., and Virginia (Howard) Courtenay.

Separated volumes include a mercantile ledger, 1781-1816, of Hercules Courtenay containing accounts of food products, tar, rum, ginseng, ships and shipping ventures, and insurance; ledgers, 1764-1779, and account book for debts receivable, 1764-1776, of Dr. John Boyd, Baltimore physician, containing records of an apothecary; books of recipes and remedies. list of American vessels destroyed by the British; daybook, 1801-1804, of merchant Henry William Courtenay with accounts for flour, food, and other commodities; account books, 1824-1826 and 1835-1842, of David S. Courtenay recording money spent for postage, cash received for legal services, expenditures in lotteries, and personal expenses; address book, possibly of David S. Courtenay; anonymous account book, 1815; scrapbook, 1836, of H. W. Courtenay; diary, 1861, of a soldier including a description of his stay in a Confederate prison; and a scrapbook, 1892-1909, of clippings relating to Baltimore and to the Purviance and Courtenay families.

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Robert Lee Flowers records, 1891-1968 22.5 Linear Feet — Approximately 21,000 Items

Robert Lee Flowers, born in 1870, spent his entire professional career at Duke University. From 1891 to 1951, Flowers served in a variety of capacities, including professor (1891-1924), vice president of the business division (1925-1941), president (1941-1948), and chancellor (1948-1951). Types of material in the collection include correspondence, memoranda, reports, clippings, bound volumes, and other printed material. Major subjects include higher education in the United States, the role of universities during World War II, the assistance of displaced scholars during World War II, the Methodist Episcopal Church, and organizations in which Flowers served, including the Duke Endowment, the Durham Chamber of Commerce, the Durham and Southern Railway Company, Greensboro College, North Carolina Central University, the Methodist Orphanage, the Oxford Orphanage, and the Lincoln Hospital. Major correspondents include William Hayes Ackland, George Garland Allen, Alexander Boyd Andrews, John Fletcher Bruton, Homer Hasenlue Dubs, Benjamin Newton Duke, William Washington Flowers, Allen Howard Godbey, Edward R. Murrow, Edward Hines Page, William Robertson Perkins, Alexander Hamilton Sands, Jr., James Augustus Thomas, and Horace Trumbauer. English. Volumes include two autograph albums.

Collection includes office files of the vice president and president of Duke University. The position of vice president included duties as secretary and treasurer. The official files consist of correspondence, memoranda, reports, printed matter and other materials received or generated by these offices. The first series, Correspondence is arranged chronologically, and the second series, Subject Files alphabetically. Besides University records, the subject files include material on higher education in America, the role of colleges and universities during World War II, the committee to assist displaced scholars, Methodist Church activities and administration, and records of the various organizations for which Flowers served as a trustee. The collection includes a series of several Volumes comprising Trinity grade books from the 1890s, an autograph album, an album of clippings and autographs, and a volume of letters in tribute to Flowers's 79th birthday.

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Wendell Holmes Stephenson papers, 1820-1968 34.6 Linear Feet — circa 25,950

The papers of Wendell Holmes Stephenson span the years 1820-1968, but the bulk of the materials date from 1922 to 1968. They consist of correspondence, writings and speeches, research and teaching material, and subject files. The collection primarily concerns Stephenson's career as a university professor, historian and author, and editor of historical journals. His field was Southern history but included American history, and his interests spanned the colonial period to the 20th century.

The beginnings of Stephenson's career are documented in a limited number of letters, writings, and notes dating from his undergraduate studies at Indiana University and his graduate work at the University of Michigan in the 1920s. These materials are scattered principally in the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, and Teaching Materials series.

The materials about his career as teacher, editor, and historical writer from the 1920s to the 1960s are not neatly segregated into particular series. The Journal of Southern History Series does record the bulk of his work with that publication, but information about particular persons, topics, and institutions is often available in more than one series, sometimes in all of them.

The Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, Teaching Material, and Research and Bibliographical Notes series span Stephenson's career from the 1920s to the 1960s. The Correspondence Series is considerably more extensive than the other series. Information about individuals, schools, associations, and publishers is principally filed in the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, and Teaching Material series. The Research and Bibliographical Notes series contains Stephenson's research notes about persons, places, and topics in Southern and American history, but additional notes and information about them may also appear in other series.

Stephenson was the first editor of the Journal of Southern History that began publication in 1935. Correspondence files are extensive, and some subject files are also available. The papers document the operations of the Journal during Stephenson's editorship, 1935-1941, but also to a limited extent as late as 1944 and in the years prior to the inception of publication. The activity recorded ranges from routine business to dealings with the principal scholars in the field. What Southern history was during this period and who was doing research and writing is amply documented.

Stephenson was later the editor of another important journal, the Mississippi Valley Historical Review, during 1946-1953. Files under its name are in the Correspondence and Subject Files series. However, there are many more files in the Correspondence Series because he integrated his editorial files into his other correspondence. Material about the Review is not confined to the years of Stephenson's editorship.

Manuscripts of the articles and books of various historians are sometimes included in their files in the Journal of Southern History, Subject Files, and Correspondence series. In most cases the presence of these writings is related to Stephenson's editorial work, but some were filed because he was interested in the work of earlier historians.

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William Preston Few (1867-1940) served as President of Trinity College from 1910-1924, and President of Duke University from 1924-1940. Few came to Trinity College in 1896 as Professor of English, was named Dean of the College in 1902, and President in 1910, succeeding John C. Kilgo. Few worked with James Buchanan Duke to establish the Duke Endowment. In 1924, Few directed Trinity College's transition to Duke University and remained as President of Duke University until his death in 1940. Few was an active layman in the Methodist Church and in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The William Preston Few Records and Papers contain correspondence from Few's office files as President of Trinity College and Duke University, reports, clippings, copies of speeches and manuscripts, memorandum books, bound volumes, index cards that catalog Few's office files, and other types of printed material. Major subjects include education; philanthropy; the development of Trinity College from its beginning in Randolph County, N.C., to Duke University; the development of the Duke Endowment; Trinity and Duke departmental operations; the school's relationship with the Methodist Church; and business of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. English.

The William Preston Few Records and Papers contain correspondence from Few's office files as President of Trinity College and Duke University, reports, clippings, copies of speeches and manuscripts, memorandum books, bound volumes, index cards that catalog Few's office files, and other types of printed material. The files are arranged in six series. They include: Correspondence, Subject Files, Bound Volumes, Oversize Materials, Index Cards to Few Papers, and Additions.

Major subjects include education; philanthropy; the development of Trinity College, from its beginning in Randolph County, N.C., to Duke University; the development of the Duke Endowment; Trinity and Duke departmental operations; the school's relationship with the Methodist Church; and business of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

The Correspondence makes up a large part of the collection. The bulk of this correspondence is from Few's office files as President of Trinity College and Duke University. The correspondence includes incoming letters to Few's office, copies of outgoing letters, reports, minutes, telegrams, newsletters, and other materials generated or received by the President's office. Among the correspondents are: William Hayes Ackland, Alice Mary Baldwin, John Spencer Bassett, Julian S. Carr, Robert D.W. Conner, Angier Buchanan Duke, Benjamin Newton Duke, James Buchanan Duke, John Carlisle Kilgo, and Edward R. Murrow. There is also some personal correspondence dating from 1885.

The Subject Files include a wide variety of materials collected by Few's office. They include correspondence, reports, clippings and other types of printed material. Major subjects include education; philanthropy; the development of Trinity College from its beginning in Randolph County, N.C., to Duke University; the development of the Duke Endowment; Trinity and Duke departmental operations; the school's relationship with the Methodist Church; and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Included are Few's speeches made at university functions, to community groups, and at funerals. There are a number of speeches that give Few's opinions about education and the development of Duke University while he was President.

The Bound Volumes include a manuscript arithmetic primer, dated 1814, written by Alston W. Kendrick, Few's grandfather; a trigonometry textbook used by Few; a Bible; class records, 1913-1929 and undated; an incomplete set of Few's memoranda books for the years 1922-1933; and several alumni reviews.

The Index Cards to Few's Papers were apparently created by Few's office and catalog the holdings in the office files. However, not all of the materials or names referenced on the index cards can be found in the William Preston Few Records and Papers.

The Oversize Materials include folders removed from the subject files, diplomas, and a bound volume. The Additions include some correspondence, and obituaries for Mrs. William Preston Few (Mary Reamey Thomas Few), that were incorporated into the collection after it was transferred to University Archives.