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James King Wilkerson papers, 1820-1929 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 896 Items

Confederate soldier, member of the 55th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, Co. K; and farmer, from Granville County, N.C. The papers of James King Wilkerson and his family date from 1820 to 1929, and consist of Civil War correspondence, a number of almanacs used as diaries, copybooks, and a few other miscellaneous papers, including a genealogical sketch. There is correspondence by Lillie Wilkerson and Luther Wilkerson, James' children, discussing social life and customs, illnesses and hospitals, employment, and personal matters; and several letters from a soldier in France during World War I. There are also two early issues of the Berea, N.C. Gazette, one from 1876, with comments on the Hayes-Tilden election, and one from shortly thereafter. The Civil War letters, written by James Wilkerson to his family, contain references to the C.S.S. Virginia, detailed descriptions of marches, comments on crop conditions as he moved from place to place, his Civil War service around Petersburg, Virginia, late in the war, and his stay in the General Hospital at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865.

The papers of James King Wilkerson (1842-1919) and his family date from 1820 to 1929, and consist of Civil War correspondence, a number of almanacs used as diaries, copybooks belonging to James when he was 16 and 17, and a few other miscellaneous papers, including a genealogical sketch. There is correspondence by Lillie Wilkerson (1877-1955) and Luther Wilkerson (1874-1942), James' children, discussing social life and customs, illnesses and hospitals, employment, and personal matters; and several letters from a soldier in France during World War I. There are also two early issues of the Berea, N.C. Gazette, one from 1876, with comments on the Hayes-Tilden election, and one from shortly thereafter.

The Civil War letters were all or nearly all written by James Wilkerson, who served in the Confederate Army, 55th North Carolina Regiment, Company K, from Aug. 1861 through spring of 1865. His letters to his family are significant for their references to the ironclad C.S.S. Virginia (the former U.S.S. Merrimac); detailed descriptions of marches, including references to orders dealing with men who couldn't keep up or fell during the march; comments on the condition of crops as he moved to different locales; and references to his Civil War service around Petersburg, Va. late in the war, and his stay in the General Hospital at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865. The collection is rounded out by a copy of The Spirit of Prayer (Nathaniel Vincent, 1840), owned by James K. Wilkerson during the Civil War.

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Robert Smith Rodgers papers, 1827-1897 and undated 3.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,389 Items

Colonel, 2nd Maryland Eastern Shore Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army. Chiefly Civil War papers belonging to Colonel Robert Rodgers, including military correspondence; telegrams; muster rolls; rosters of officers and staff; lists of deserters, recruits, reenlistments, and voluntary enlistments; reports of sick, wounded, and convalescents; inventories of personal effects of the deceased; hospital and army paroles; morning reports; ordnance returns, invoices, requisitions, issues, and transfers; quartermaster papers; letter book containing routine military correspondence; and general and special orders. After 1863 there are references to African American contrabands. There is also a fragmentary account of the regiment's war experiences concerning the actions in Maryland in 1862 and 1863, including the battle between the U.S.S. Monitor and the C.S.S. Virginia, and in Virginia and West Virginia in 1864. Also included in the collection are papers relating to the Rodgers family of Maryland, including Rodgers's son Robert Slidell Rodgers, practicing law in Missouri following the Civil War.

Chiefly Civil War military papers belonging to Colonel Robert Rodgers, including military correspondence; telegrams; muster rolls; rosters of officers and staff; lists of deserters, recruits, reenlistments, and voluntary enlistments; reports of sick, wounded, and convalescents; inventories of personal effects of the deceased; hospital and army paroles; morning reports; ordnance returns, invoices, requisitions, issues, and transfers; quartermaster papers; letter book containing routine military correspondence; and general and special orders. There are references after 1863 to treatment of and problems with contrabands. There is also a fragmentary account written by Rodgers of the regiment's war experiences concerning the actions in Maryland in 1862 and 1863, including the battle between the U.S.S. Monitor and the C.S.S. Virginia, and in Virginia and West Virginia in 1864.

Scattered papers relate to other members of the Rodgers family, and include personal correspondence, letters relating to naval matters, estate papers, bills and receipts, and legal papers concerning land deeds and the manumission of a slave by Rodger's mother Minerva in the 1850s. There is an inventory of the property of Jerusha Denison at "Sion Hill" in 1856. Also included are materials for the study of navigation and a navigational logbook.

For many more details on the papers and the volumes in the collection, please ask a reference archivist to consult the main card file.