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Amy Mariaskin Zine collection, 1995-2005 3 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Amy Mariaskin began collecting and trading zines with other women as a member of the Pittsburgh, PA, Riot Grrrl Chapter from 1995-2002. She authored the zine Southern Fried Darling from 1995-2002, and Vortext, about meteorology and weather. Collection consists of about 150 zines, mostly self-published by women and girls in the United States. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, music, mental health, depression and mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, transgender issues, and race. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of about 150 zines, mostly self-published by women and girls in the United States. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, music, mental health, depression and mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, transgender issues, and race. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Bill Brown is a filmmaker, photographer, and zinester from Lubbock, Texas. His films explore the landscapes of North America, including the United States–Mexico border, North Dakota missile silos, and the Trans-Canada Highway, and have been exhibited at film festivals and museums around the world. He received a BFA from Harvard in 1992 and a MFA from CalArts in 1997. Brown is the author of a zine called Dream Whip as well as a novel on the underground in L.A., Saugus to the Sea. In January 2013, Bill Brown donated his personal collection of zines, comprising 186 titles and almost 250 issues in total. Although Brown never actively collected zines, he was always eager to barter and trade with other zine makers. The resulting collection includes zines spanning from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The zines are arranged alphabetically by title.

In January 2013, Bill Brown donated his personal collection of zines, comprising 186 titles and almost 250 issues in total. Although Brown never actively collected zines, he was always eager to barter and trade with other zine makers. The resulting collection includes zines spanning from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The zines are arranged alphabetically by title.

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In 1996, Bitch: Feminst Response to Pop Culture was created by Lisa Jervis, Benjamin Shaykin, and Andi Zeisler. After having a hard time finding critiques of sexism in pop culture in magazines and self published zines, they decided to make their own. Their goals are to write about sexism in pop culture, propose alternatives, and promote pop products that are pro-woman and pro-feminism. Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Dwayne Dixon Zine collection, ca. 1984-ca. 1995 2.5 Linear Feet — 224 Items

Dwayne Dixon was an employee in the Literacy Through Photography program at the Center for Documentary Studies. Collection includes 110 zines (150 items, ca. 1984-ca. 1995) produced across the United States and Central America and collected by Dixon throughout the 1990s. The majority of the zines demonstrate young men's search for life meaning, morality, and identity, especially through hardcore and punk music/lifestyle, including interviews with bands, album reviews, and criticism of the status quo. Other groups of zines were produced by children participating in various afterschool and enrichment programs in Durham, NC; by Central American women in Mexico, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and El Salvador; and by American young women raging against rape and sexism and searching for a less traditional sexual identity. Many zines include erotica, drawings, copies of photographs, and cartoons.

110 zines (150 items, ca. 1984-ca. 1995) produced across the United States and Central America and collected by Dixon throughout the 1990s. The majority of the zines demonstrate young men's search for life meaning, morality, and identity, especially through hardcore and punk music/lifestyle, including interviews with bands, album reviews, and criticism of the status quo. Other groups of zines were produced by children participating in various afterschool and enrichment programs in Durham, NC; by Central American women in Mexico, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and El Salvador; and by American young women raging against rape and sexism and searching for a less traditional sexual identity. Many zines include erotica, drawings, copies of photographs, and cartoons. Online searchable database includes more detailed descriptions of the first accession of this collection. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Sarah Dyer Zine collection, 1985-2005 18.3 Linear Feet — 2050 Items

Approximately 2000 individual zines and nearly 800 titles, most self-published by women and girls 1985-2000. Most were produced in the United States, a few come from Canada and other countries. In-house database with subject access available. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, sexual abuse, music, mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, and erotica. The collection includes four audiocassette tapes and one VHS tape. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Approximately 2000 individual zines and nearly 800 titles, most self-published by women and girls 1985-2000. Most were produced in the United States, a few come from Canada and other countries. In-house database with subject access available. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, sexual abuse, music, mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, and erotica. The collection includes four audiocassette tapes and one VHS tape. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition #1 (2002-0319) contains approximately 150 titles.

Addition #2 (2006-0068) contains approximately 150 titles and are separated into two groups: those authored by women and those authored by men.

Addition #3 (2008-0030) contains approximately 175 titles and one VHS tape.

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Sarah Maitland Zine collection, 1997-2009 4 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Virginia-based writer Sarah Maitland began producing zines around 2001 and ran a zine distro for about three years. She was a founder of the Richmond Zine Fest which started in 2007. Approximately 220 titles from Sarah Maitland's personal zine collection, most dating between 1998 and 2008 and discussing a wide range of subjects. Also contains some material from Maitland's personal projects, as well as buttons, cassettes, stickers, and other ephemera.

This collection contains approximately 220 titles (some with multiple issues) from Sarah Maitland's personal zine collection, most dating between 1998 and 2008. The zines are largely about women, feminism, sexuality, and personal stories; specific subjects include feminism, sexual assault, political activism, parenting, vegan recipes, racism, bisexuality, pop culture, television shows, love, sex, mental disorders, higher education, sizism, punk rock, sex dichotomy, transgender issues, and media. Also contains some material from Maitland's personal projects, such as promotional materials from the Richmond Zine Fest, as well as buttons, cassettes, stickers, and other ephemera.

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Sarah Wood Zine collection, 1990s 2 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Sarah Wood was the co-owner of GERLL Press, a zine distro based in Chicago, Ill., in the early to mid-1990s. The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Many of these zines come directly from the GERLL Press inventory, or were submitted to Wood and Curry by their authors to be considered for sale through the distro. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Since the 1960s, and particularly after the Stonewall uprising of 1969, the modern women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements (LGBT) have produced their own magazines, journals, newspapers, and newsletters as a strategy for unifying and galvanizing their constituencies. These periodicals served to inform movement activists about pertinent actions, news stories, and cultural trends unreported by the mainstream media. The Women's and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Periodicals Collection comprises individual issues of periodicals produced by or reporting on organizations involved in the women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection comprises individual issues of periodicals produced by or reporting on organizations involved in the women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements (LGBT) of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. A wide variety of periodical genres are represented here, including literary and art journals, newspapers, organizational newsletters, and popular culture magazines. The periodicals in this collection were donated by individuals, purchased, or separated from manuscript collections. Manuscript collections held by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library from which periodicals were separated are the Catherine Nicholson Papers; the Dan Kirsch Papers; the Kate Millett Papers; the Irene Peslikis Papers; the Minnie Bruce Pratt Papers; the Margaret McFadden Papers; and the Charis Books and More-Charis Circle Records. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The original collection numbered forty-one boxes. Additions in 2009, 2011 and 2012 expanded the collection.