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Angela M. Jeannet papers, 1969-1983 4.5 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

Collection documents the activities of one of the earliest local women's liberation groups, started during the second wave of feminism, and co-founded by Jeannet. Included are clippings and a number of publications (volumes, pamphlets, newsletters, and other periodicals) relative to the movement, including newsletters from the Lancaster Women's Liberation Women's Center. Topics discussed include sexual harassment, the Equal Rights Amendment, the pro-choice movement, campus activism, women and work, and the National Organization for Women. Other materials document the inner workings and activities of Jeannet and the group, such as correspondence and meeting minutes. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, 1876-2019 and undated, bulk 1950-2019 651 boxes — 651 boxes; 8 oversize folders; 2 tubes; 2 frames.

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. Her collection comprises research files, correspondence, audio and video recordings, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks, artifacts, and artwork, all deriving from Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation in the United States. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Topics include: art and architecture in the 20th century; gender and society; historic preservation; media and society; social conditions in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. politics and public policy, particularly related to the Democratic Party; women and the arts; women's rights; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 document her family history and early personal life. The collection also includes some materials concerning her husband, Carl Spielvogel, whose papers are also in the Rubenstein Library. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University and are available online.

Spanning 1876 to 2019, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to 2019, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Collection documents the life and career of a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection comprises over 650 boxes of research files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, artifacts, and artwork, all stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's long career and her prolific output of books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University.

Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions, women's rights and the arts in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. and overseas politics, particularly related to the Democratic Party; U.S. public policy, with a focus on the arts; the built environment; women and the arts; gender issues and women's rights; travel abroad; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 - chiefly correspondence, writings, and photographs - document family history, her education, and her earliest career in teaching. Other early dates in the collection refer to reproductions of 19th century images chiefly found in exhibit and research files.

The collection is divided into series: Correspondence, Writings, Personal Files, Political Files, Professional Files, Art and Architecture Project Files, Art and Design Project Files, Historic Preservation Project Files, Scrapbooks and Visual Arts Materials.

Taken as a whole, the collection offers rich documentation on the evolution of art and architecture in the U.S., the development of adaptive reuse and landmarks legislation, the relationship of public policy to the arts, and the interplay between public policy and the built environment. Materials from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's personal and research files also document the changing roles of men and women in the United States, and the development of U.S. gender studies; not only did she write on the subject, but her own experiences reveal aspects of women in the workforce, in politics and activist movements, and in positions of authority. Additionally, because of her work for the White House and the Democratic Party, the collection offers insights into 20th century U.S. politics, nationally and in her home state of New York.

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Photojournalist who documented the women's movement and associated human rights issues since the 1960s. The photographs in the collection date from 1959 to 2007, with the bulk taken by Lane in the 1970s and 1980s. Subjects focus largely on events and individuals. Events include consciousness raising groups, planning meetings, and local women's conferences. Large events include Equal Rights Amendment demonstrations, and International Women's Year and National Organization for Women conferences and marches, in major cities such as New York City, Washington D.C., Mexico City, and Houston. Other events folders document Pro-Choice rallies and protests addressing harassment, sexism, and violence towards women. Another large series documents women involved in the movement, from feminist leaders to event attendees and coordinators. Subject folder photographs are of women at work, women athletes, men for women's rights, and events relating to daycare, feminist slogans and signs, lesbian rights, opposition, women of color, sexist images, and sexual health. Smaller sets of images document protests against war, pornography, and nuclear power. The collection also includes photographs of Bettye Lane and her original inventory sheets. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Bettye Lane photographs date from 1959 to 2007, with the bulk taken in the 1970s and 1980s. Subjects focus largely on events and individuals. Events include consciousness raising groups, planning meetings, and local women's conferences. Large events include Equal Rights Amendment demonstrations, and International Women's Year and National Organization for Women conferences and marches, in major cities such as New York City, Washington D.C., Mexico City, and Houston. Other events folders document Pro-Choice rallies and protests addressing harassment, sexism, and violence towards women. Another large series documents women involved in the movement, from feminist leaders to event attendees and coordinators. Subject folder photographs are of women at work, women athletes, men for women's rights, and events relating to daycare, feminist slogans and signs, lesbian rights, opposition, women of color, sexist images, and sexual health. Smaller sets of images document protests against war, pornography, and nuclear power. The collection also includes a folder of photographs of Bettye Lane spanning her career.

The photographs are arranged into three series, Events, People, and Subjects, with subdivisions in alphabetical order, and the prints within in date or alphabetical order. The original order as assembled by Lane is for the most part intact, with folder titles deriving from the original headings. Included in each folder are her original annotated inventory sheets, which include dates, photo identification codes, and titles.

Almost all the prints are unmounted black-and-white gelatin silver process prints, with some color photographs scattered throughout, and a few digital prints from the 2000s. The larger prints all have detailed information on the backs, many giving names of individuals present, details on the events, and contextual notes. There are also a few photocopies scattered throughout. There are some duplicate images or cropped versions. The most typical sizes are 8x10 and 6 1/4 x 9 1/4 inches, with some snapshots found in a few folders.

There is some overlap with Bettye Lane images in other U.S. institutional collections, noted below, but many of the images at Duke University are unique.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Diane Weddington papers, 1970-2008 10.8 Linear Feet — 10,000 Items

Diane Weddington was a journalist and religion editor at the Contra Costa Times in the 1980s-1990s. Collection includes Weddington's published articles, research clippings, reporter notes, and other publications and materials from her journalism career. Topics represented include the gay and lesbian community in San Francisco, the ordination of women and gay clergy, the women's rights movement, domestic violence and child abuse, and other miscellaneous subjects.

The collection includes a variety of materials, ranging from Weddington's published articles to clippings of other articles used in her research. The coverage of the homosexual community in and around San Francisco is represented in two series; the first being Coverage of Gay Clergy in the Church. This series includes legal proceedings by the Lutheran Church against gay clergy, as well as Weddington's own reporter notebooks from her time covering the subject. A second series, Coverage of Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Communities, includes materials from Weddington's involvement in the National Lesbian and Gay Journalist Association and the Frameline film festival. Also included in this series are coverage of the blackballing of gay and lesbian news by the Contra Costa Times, business directories from San Francisco, local gay pride events, and mainstream coverage of gays and lesbians in America.

The series on Weddington's Research, Clippings, and Reporting from Various Projects includes materials from her religion beat at the Contra Costa Times, as well as other internal correspondence and clippings from her work at the newspaper. Subjects include general women's news, as well as articles on domestic violence and rape, child abuse, Satanism, recovered memory phenomena, and women's rights. Also included in this series are materials from Weddington's many projects, including the War Tax Resistance campaign, Diablo Valley study groups and clubs, Journalists Exchange on Aging, and gardening. Finally, this series includes materials from Weddington's coverage of the visit of Pope John Paul II to San Francisco in 1987.

Women in the Church includes materials from Weddington's own involvement in the women's ordination movement in the Episcopal Church, as well as her clippings of coverage regarding women and religion during the 1970s-1980s. Also related and included in this series are Weddington's materials from her time as a student at the Divinity School at Duke University in the 1970s.

Weddington's Published Articles and Reporter's Notes appear to date largely from 1986-1992, although many articles and most of her notes are undated. These clippings from the Contra Costa Times along with news wires reveal the breadth of Weddington's journalism, with topics ranging from the religion section to breaking news about traffic accidents. The materials are not sorted or arranged in any way. Along with clippings and reporter's notebook pages, the series also includes some correspondence from readers, internal Contra Costa Times photography requests, press releases, and other miscellaneous pages used by Weddington in her work.

Finally, the Correspondence series includes both electronic (print-outs) and postal correspondence. One part of the series consists of dot matrix printer printouts of internal communications between the staff and management of the Contra Costa Times. Weddington writes that this material documents the bias against gays and lesbians, as well as the regular workflow of the newspaper in terms of scheduling reporters, meeting deadlines, internal gossip, and so on. Another portion of the series contains letters, greeting cards, and other personal and professional correspondence. These have been arranged by year but not sorted further.

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The Feminist Women's Health Center in Atlanta, Georgia, was founded in 1976 by a group of women dissatisfied with the health care options and information available to them and who desired to change this situation. The clinic started in 1977 with self-help groups where women were able to learn from each other and themselves through open discussions. It expanded to offer a full range of clinical services (including providing access to birth control and contraception, abortion, donor insemination, and pregnancy care) as well as educational, outreach, and advocacy programs, addressing subjects such as sexual hygiene, sex, and sexually transmitted diseases. Collection is comprised of files documenting the development and daily operations of the Feminist Women's Health Center, a feminist non-profit women's healthcare center, from the years 1973-2003. Major components of the collection include files from research studies conducted at the center, policies and procedures for maintaining the center, and incidents of anti-abortion protests at the center, specifically involving the group Operation Rescue. The National Abortion Federation, the professional association of abortion providers in the United States and Canada, also figures prominently throughout these records. The collection is organized into six series: Administrative Files, Clinic Files, Subject Files, Financial Material, Legal Files, and Audiovisual Material. The collection also contains a physically separate Closed Series, comprised of materials from the prior six series that are currently closed to research.

Collection is comprised of files documenting the development and daily operations of the Feminist Women's Health Center (FWHC), a feminist non-profit women's healthcare center, from the years 1974-2003. Major components of the collection include files from research studies conducted at the center, policies and procedures for maintaining the center, and incidents of anti-abortion protests at the center, specifically involving the group Operation Rescue. The National Abortion Federation, the professional association of abortion providers in the United States and Canada, also figures prominently throughout these records. The collection is organized into six series: Administrative Files, Clinic Files, Subject Files, Financial Material, Legal Files, and Audiovisual Material. The collection also contains a physically segregated Closed Series.

The Administrative Files Series most clearly documents the day-to-day operations of the FWHC. Materials in this series include policies, procedures, and guidelines for operation of the center; minutes and notes from a range of meetings held by the center; personnel files; and schedules. This series contains four subseries: General Administrative Files, Meetings, Personnel Files, and Schedules.

Materials in the Clinic Files Series include a range of records related to clinical services provided and research studies conducted at the FWHC. This series has been divided into four subseries: Statistics, Laboratory Statistics, Research, and Patient Education Information.

The Subject Files Series includes files maintained by the staff of the FWHC on a range of topics related to women's health issues, events, local information, and other women's health clinics. This series contains two subseries: a General subseries which covers these subjects broadly, and an Anti-Abortion Violence subseries which focuses specifically on anti-abortion protests at the FWHC and other locations, the anti-abortion movement in the United States, and pro-choice efforts to counter this movement.

Items in the Financial Material Series consist of records, reports, and files documenting the financial situation of the FWHC between the years 1982 and 2001. These files detail the intricacies involved in operating a women's health clinic from a financial standpoint.

The Legal Files Series contains files related to legal issues faced by the FWHC, including lawsuits and legislation which would affect women's reproductive health and the clinic.

The Audiovisual Material Series consists of 28 audiocassettes and 11 videocassettes. Audiocassettes are primarily recordings of workshops, conference sessions, and events. Videocassettes are primarily educational. One videocassette documents anti-abortion protesters outside the FWHC.

The Closed Series consists of sensitive materials removed from the previous six series and CLOSED to research.

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Collection comprises writings by Jean Gonzalez/Juana Maria Paz, 1977-2006 and undated, reflecting the breadth of her work and interests, from lesbian feminism to intential community and the lesbian land movement, with a primary focus on community building. Includes journal articles and book chapters, letters to the editor, newsletters, plays, and position statements, often in both draft and published form. Many of these works comprise her signature works in lesbian and feminist theory. Also includes architectural plans and drawings for her home in Twin Oaks.

Collection comprises writings by Jean Gonzalez/Juana Maria Paz, 1977-2006 and undated, reflecting the breadth of her work and interests, from lesbian feminism to intential community and the lesbian land movement, with a primary focus on community building. Includes journal articles and book chapters, letters to the editor, newsletters, plays, and position statements, often in both draft and published form. Many of these works comprise her signature works in lesbian and feminist theory. Also includes architectural plans and drawings for her home in Twin Oaks.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Meredith Tax papers, 1956-2016 125 Linear Feet — 213 boxes

Meredith Tax is a feminist writer and organizer who has been active since the 1960s. This large collection of her papers includes many files of records documenting her activism in feminism and her role in founding feminist organizations; drafts and manuscripts of her writings, music, and art; personal and professional correspondence; research materials; and subject files. Organizations well represented include Bread and Roses; Women's WORLD; CARASA (Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse); PEN American Center Women's Committee; and the International PEN Women's Writers Committee, as well as many other materials on other organizations. There are also 89 audio cassettes and a few VHS tapes and optical media containing Tax's research interviews as well as interviews with Tax. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

The Meredith Tax papers include materials from the activist organizations she was involved with, as well as drafts and manuscripts of her written work, some personal correspondence, teaching materials, and audio/visual materials.

The largest group of materials at over 130 boxes documents Tax's long career as an activist, beginning with her involvement in Boston's Bread and Roses, a socialist-feminist collective through her continued work with Women's WORLD, a global free speech network Tax cofounded in 1994 to fight gender-based censorship. Other organizations Tax was involved in are also well documented in the collection, including CARASA (Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse); PEN American Center Women's Committee; and International PEN Women's Writers Committee. Smaller amounts of material come from Tax's work with the October League, Chicago Women's Liberation Union, National Writers' Union, and the West Side Community School, as well as other organizations. These materials include committee and board materials, events files, conferences, and many files of organizational notes and records.

Tax's work as a writer, including books, both fiction and nonfiction, articles, essays, and speeches as well as songs, is represented in the Writings, Speeches, and Songs series. The Correspondence series includes both personal and professional correspondence. The Subject Files were created by Tax for research related to her activism and her writing.

Finally, there are 89 audiocassettes, 53 of which contain Tax's research interviews and 36 of which contain interviews with Tax, readings by Tax and board meetings. Other interviews are on several VHS videocassettes and optical discs.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

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Abortion rights activist and the publisher of the feminist magazine ON THE ISSUES. The bulk of the collection consists of the records of Choices Women's Medical Center, a New York City women's health clinic and abortion clinic co-founded by Hoffman in 1971, and the organizational records for ON THE ISSUES, a feminist magazine owned by Choices and overseen by Hoffman. The remainder of the collection consists of Hoffman's personal papers, mostly related to her pro-choice activism. The collection also includes writings by or interviews with many activists, such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Charlotte Bunch, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Kate Millett, Marge Piercy, and Elie Wiesel. The correspondence, administrative files, minutes, manuals, reports, surveys, research files, electronic records, clippings, flyers, brochures, newsletters, photographs, and audiovisual materials in the collection provide rich material for the study of the history of abortion, the pro-choice movement, women's health care, and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. The records of Choices Women's Medical Center are especially valuable for understanding the medical practice of abortion, as well as the political context of that practice. Other topics that can be explored through the materials include contraception, women's rights and feminism, and rape. The addition (04-041 and 04-062) (18,750 items, 30 linear feet; dated 1971-2003) consists primarily of administrative and financial files from Choices Women's Medical Center and predecessor clinics, including correspondence, financial reports, public relations and media files, board meeting files, policy and procedure manuals, subject files, insurance files, program files, grants files, legal files, and files related to ON THE ISSUES magazine. Also included are a small number of Hoffman's personal writings. This accession is unprocessed and closed to researchers. Addition (05-023) (5150 items, 12 lin. ft; dated 1978-2003) consists primarily of administrative and financial records from Choices Women's Medical Center, including correspondence, financial reports, public relations and media files. Also includes board meeting, subject, insurance, program, legal and grant files, as well as policy and procedure manuals; 33 videotapes, 84 slides, 54 photographs and contact sheets; 1 CD-ROM; printed materials; and promotional calendars. Accession is unprocessed and closed to researchers.

The papers of Merle Hoffman span the years from about 1944 to 2001, with most of the papers dating between 1961 and 2001. The collection is arranged in the following series: Choices, On the Issues, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. The bulk of the materials consist of the records of Choices Women's Medical Center, a New York City women's health clinic and abortion clinic co-founded by Hoffman in 1971, and the organizational records for On the Issues, a feminist magazine owned by Choices and overseen by Hoffman. The remainder of the collection consists of Hoffman's personal papers, mostly related to her pro-choice activism. The collection also includes writings by or interviews with many activists such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Charlotte Bunch, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Kate Millett, Marge Piercy, and Elie Wiesel. The correspondence, administrative files, minutes, manuals, reports, surveys, research files, electronic records, clippings, flyers, brochures, newsletters, photographs, and audiovisual materials in the collection provide rich material for the study of the history of abortion, the pro-choice movement, women's health care, and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. The records of Choices Women's Medical Center are especially valuable for understanding the medical practice of abortion, as well as the political context of that practice. Other topics that can be explored through the materials include contraception, women's rights and feminism, and rape.

The political context of abortion is further documented throughout the rest of the collection. Hoffman's writings, speeches, and interviews on abortion illuminate the abortion debate in the media. At the same time, the internal dynamics of the pro-choice movement are documented in files on various New York and national pro-choice organizations. The collection includes some materials on the National Association of Abortion Facilities (NAAF), the National Abortion Federation (NAF), the National Coalition of Abortion Providers (NCAP), the National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL), and the National Organization for Women (NOW). Especially noteworthy are the detailed meeting minutes and other records for the New York Pro-Choice Coalition, an umbrella organization for New York City pro-choice organizations founded by Hoffman in the mid 1980s.

In addition to her pro-choice activities, Merle Hoffman has been a vocal proponent of patient self-empowerment; an active supporter of various political candidates in New York City; and a feminist activist. The collection reflects these interests to varying degrees. The records of On the Issues magazine are especially useful as a source of writings on a broad range of feminist and other issues.

The Choices Series documents the day-to-day operations of Choices Women's Medical Center, including the clinic's medical policies and procedures, its internal administration, and its relationship with patients and community organizations. The series is divided into the following subseries: Correspondence, Subject Files, Legal Papers, Personnel, Security, Staff Files, Marketing, Operations, and Electronic Format. Much of the series consists of files on administrative issues, dating primarily from the late 1980s to the late 1990s. A few records date from the clinic's early years in the 1970s. The files also document the clinic staff's rising concern about Operation Rescue, militant anti-abortion protests, and anti-abortion violence during the late 1980s and 1990s. At the same time, the Choices records suggest how the ideals of feminist health care and patient empowerment have translated into medical practice. The records primarily provide the perspective of health providers rather than patients; the collection does not include patient medical records. However, patient surveys and a limited amount of patient correspondence provide some evidence of patient experience at the clinic. There is substantial material on the Choices East Project, Hoffman's unsuccessful attempt to establish a women's health clinic in Moscow. Choices' treatment philosophy of patient self-empowerment and its identity as a woman-friendly health care provider are documented in the Outreach Subseries and the Marketing Subseries. Information on patient experiences and reactions to the clinic can be found primarily through patient surveys, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and statistical summaries of patient demographics, all found in the Subject Files, Marketing, and Electronic Format Subseries. Choices organizational charts and staff rosters are available for reference in the Research Room's inventory drawers; please contact Research Services.

On the Issues (1983-1999), a feminist magazine, was founded by Merle Hoffman and produced by Choices staff. The magazine covered a broad range of feminist issues and topics, including but not limited to abortion and other women's health issues. During the 1990s the magazine became increasingly professionalized, moved from annual to quarterly publication, and operated more independently of Choices. The documents in the On The Issues Series provide an extensive record of the magazine's production and distribution. They primarily date from the 1990s and are organized into the following subseries: Issues, Correspondence, Article Files, Editorial Files, Production and Distribution, Marketing, Staff Files, Administration, and Electronic Format. The series includes a nearly complete run of issues. Files include reader surveys; mailing lists; drafts and correspondence from contributors; editorials by Hoffman and other writers; and working files maintained by individual editors and production staff. Electronic files contain similar materials, and include graphics.

The Personal Files Series is arranged into the following subseries: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, Politics and Activism, New York Pro-Choice Coalition, Calendars, Phone Messages, Clippings, General Personal Files, and Electronic Format. The materials extensively document Hoffman's work as a writer, public speaker, organizer, and activist for abortion rights and other feminist causes. Hoffman's personal publicity materials, including curriculum vitae and biographical sketches, can also be found in this series. There are also some records of Hoffman's childhood and personal life. The correspondence, found in both the Correspondence and Electronic Format Subseries, contains significant personal exchanges with feminists, friends, and colleagues that span many decades. Pro-choice organizations represented in the series include the New York Pro-Choice Coalition (NYPCC), the National Organization for Women (NOW), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and the National Association of Abortion Facilities (NAAF). The series also contains Hoffman's phone message books, calendars, and scrapbooks, including those related to her work at Choices and On the Issues. Electronic files contain a variety of correspondence, mailing lists, graphics, Choice and On the Issues documents mixed on the same disks, and a few writings. Overall, the series amply illustrates the porous nature of the boundary between Hoffman's personal activities and her work at Choices and On the Issues.

The Photographic Materials Series contains a variety of material related to Choices Women's Medical Center, On the Issues magazine, and Hoffman's personal activities. Especially notable are the numerous images of the Choices clinic facilities and procedures, and the detailed visual record of pro-choice rallies and other events involving Hoffman during the 1980s. Political figures pictured in this series include Bella Abzug, Hilary Clinton, Andrea Dworkin, Geraldine Ferraro, Flo (Florynce) Kennedy, Congressman John Lewis, and Gloria Steinem. Other photographs in the Personal Subseries include portraits of Hoffman and snapshots from a vacation at the feminist Camp Sister Spirit.

The bulk of the Audiovisual Materials Series consists of audio recordings on cassette tape of New York City radio talk shows featuring Merle Hoffman as an interview subject. Most interviews date from the 1970s or early 1980s. In some cases, these recordings feature Hoffman responding to listeners in call-in discussions of abortion, or conducting debates with anti-abortion representatives. Other audio recordings include interviews conducted for On the Issues stories and radio advertisements for Choices. Videotape recordings include several episodes of "On the Issues," Merle Hoffman's cable access television show, and some documentary material on Choices and its patients. Materials are not immediately accessible until use copies can be made upon request. Please consult with reference staff before coming to use the collection.

Finally, the Ephemera Series contains various memorabilia, including a box of Choices condoms, buttons, and banners with feminist and political slogans.

Later accessions (2004-0041, 2004-0062, 2005-0023, and 2012-0049) have been added to the end of the finding aid. Boxlists are included when known.

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Milo Guthrie papers, 1962-1987 20.2 Linear Feet — circa 15,150 Items

The Milo Guthrie Papers consist mainly of periodicals and printed materials produced by American politically left organizations and document a range of issues including civil rights, feminism, environmental defense, nuclear freeze and disarmament, gay and lesbian rights, Latin American and Puerto Rican politics, labor issues, and various political parties and candidates, particularly the Socialist Party. Included is a small amount of original material, primarily correspondence with members of various organizations concerning support for issues and activities. Much of this is directly related to the political campaigns of independent party candidates as well as Guthrie's own political campaigns in Tennessee in 1982 and 1984.

While the collection provides a concentrated wealth of information on a wide range of political and social issues during a time of significant political activity from the left, there is relatively little documentation of Guthrie's involvement with most of the groups represented in the collection's periodicals and printed materials. Scattered notes on flyers and form letters show that he was involved in several groups to some extent. However, it is not clear at this point if the bulk of the materials in this collection contain examples of his graphics, demonstrate the range of his political activities, reflect a passive interest in various issues and organizations, or a combination of these.

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Nancy Blood papers, 1967-1977 1.5 Linear Feet — 750 items

Nancy Blood is a retired Durham County Public Libraries librarian and is also a feminist and LGBT rights activist. Accession (2009-0101) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1967-1977 and undated) consists of a subject file of printed materials discussing women's health, employment, art, feminism, academics, law, motherhood, etc. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0101) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1967-1977 and undated) consists of a subject file of printed materials discussing women's health, employment, art, feminism, academics, law, motherhood, etc. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.