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Batya Weinbaum papers, 1960-2015 46.5 Linear Feet — 82 boxes — 1.4 Gigabytes

Batya Weinbaum is a Jewish American artist, musician, poet, author, editor and professor. In addition to founding and editing the interdisciplinary feminist journal Femspec, she has published 17 books and more than 250 articles, poems, essays and reviews. She has made significant contributions to the fields of multiculturalism, women's studies, sexuality studies and education. The Batya Weinbaum papers consist of 83 boxes, spanning the years 1960-2015, and document a significant portion of her personal and professional history. The collection contains substantial materials related to Weinbaum's writing and research, including drafts of her books, materials related to the journal Femspec, and several decades of journals and sketchbooks.

This collection documents Weinbaum's personal life, education and professional life. The Batya Weinbaum papers are arranged into the following thirteen series: Legal, Correspondence, Press, Activities, Research and Scholarship, Art, Writing, Teaching, Photography, Print Materials, Journals, Family Memorabilia and Audiovisual Materials.

The first series largely documents Weinbuam's lawsuit against Cleveland State University from 2004-2006. The second series contains correspondence primarily related to Weinbaim's teaching and publications, but also has personal correspondence and letters she exchanged with influential figures in various fields such as contemporary American literature, multiculturalism, women's studies, poetry, music composition and education. The third and fourth series include press and reviews related to Weinbaum's personal writings and artwork, as well as items associated with workshops, speaking engagements and other activities given or attended by Weinbaum. The next four series contain substantial materials related to Weinbaum's writing and research, including: drafts of her books, poetry, academic publications, artwork, music and materials related to editing and publishing the journal FemSpec. The Teaching series also encompasses syllabi and course materials used during Weinbaum's time as a graduate student instructor and as a professional at Cleveland State University and Pacifica Graduate Institute.

The collection also includes an extensive Photography series, with photographs/negatives Weinbaum took professionally as a documentary photographer in South America and Mexico; fieldwork in China and Israel, as well as family photo albums and scrapbooks. The eleventh series contains several decades of journals, notebooks and sketchbooks. The Family Memorabilia series documents Weinbaum's relationship with her daughter, Ola Liota Weinbaum. The Audiovisual Materials series has electronic files in a variety of formats including: floppy discs, cassettes, CD-ROMs, DVD-ROMs and VHS tapes. These files encompass Weinbaum's writing and material related to FemSpec. The contents of Weinbuam's hard drive are also described throughout the series where appropriate. Where possible, Weinbuam's original folder titles and descriptions have been retained.

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The Duke-UNC Center for Research on Women was founded in 1982 as a collaborative endeavor between Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to promote Women's Studies scholarship, research, and curriculum development in the South. The project was originally named the Duke-UNC Women's Studies Research Center, but changed its name to the Duke-UNC Center for Research on Women in 1987. The Center operated with support from the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation, smaller grants from local foundations, and institutional backing from Duke and UNC. The records contain correspondence, reports, grant documents, audiotapes, a videotape, and other materials relating to the Center for Research on Women. Major subjects include women's studies curriculum development and research, pay equity, and the relationships between race, class, and gender. Materials range in date from 1982 to 1992. English.

The records of the Duke University/University of North Carolina Center for Research on Women contain correspondence, reports, grant documents, audiotapes, a videotape, and other materials relating to the Center for Research on Women. Major subjects include women's studies curriculum development and research, pay equity, and the relationships between race, class, and gender. Materials range in date from 1982 to 1992.

Some of the materials in this collection are not immediately accessible because they require further processing before use. Please contact the University Archives before visiting to use this collection.

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The Women's Studies Program at Duke University started in 1983 and grew rapidly into one of the largest interdisciplinary programs at the University, now called Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. The Women's Studies Program Records contain materials related to the foundation, growth, activities, and alumni of the Women's Studies Program.

The Women's Studies Program Records contain materials related to the foundation, growth, activities, and alumni of the Women's Studies Program. Included are correspondence, minutes, reports, newsletters, flyers, budgets, programs, surveys, and many other materials. Topics include the development of the Women's Studies Program from a certificate program to an undergraduate major and minor as well as the growth of graduate scholarship; the curriculum of the Program and the inclusion of women's studies and women's topics in other areas of the University; outreach to and fundraising with Duke alumni women and others; programs and events organized by Women's Studies, especially the Graduate Research Conference and other large conferences hosted by Women's Studies; the work of the Council on Women's Studies; and a survey given to all women alumni of Duke from the 1920s through the 1980s including questions related to their Duke experience, activities since graduation, and perspective on women's issues, among many other subjects. The majority of the materials date from Jean O'Barr's tenure as director of Women's Studies.