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Amy Morris Bradley was a nurse and agent of the U.S. Sanitary Commission during the Civil War as well as an educator in Maine, 1840s-1850s, and Wilmington, N.C., 1865-1890s. Collection comprises correspondence, diaries, record books, and photographs documenting Bradley's family life and teaching in Maine during the 1840s, her travels throughout the South and Costa Rica in the 1850s, her duties as a nurse at several U.S. Sanitary Commission convalescent camps during the Civil War, and her post-war work in Wilmington, N.C., where she founded free schools for white children in 1866 and 1872 under the auspices of the Soldiers' Memorial Society and worked as an administrator in the public school system until 1891. The collection includes two salted paper prints and several albumen photographs of Civil War relief camps, some by noted photographer Alexander Gardner.

Collection comprises correspondence, diaries, record books, and photographs documenting Bradley's family life and teaching in Maine during the 1840s, her travels throughout the South and Costa Rica in the 1850s, her duties as a nurse at several U.S. Sanitary Commission convalescent camps during the Civil War, and her post-war work in Wilmington, N.C., where she founded free schools for white children in 1866 and 1872 under the auspices of the Soldiers' Memorial Society and worked as an administrator in the public school system until 1891. The collection includes two salted paper prints and several albumen photographs of Civil War relief camps, some by noted photographer Alexander Gardner.

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Annie L. Hobbs Diaries, 1854-1869 0.2 Linear Feet — 4 Items

Annie L. Hobbs of Laconia, N.H. was an instructor at the New Hampshire Conference Seminary and Female College (Methodist) in Tilton, N.H. and at the Troy Conference Academy in Poultney, Vt. during the 1850s and 1860s. Collection contains two manuscript pocket diaries, dated 1867 and 1869, and two pocket memoranda books, dated 1854-1855, 1859, and 1863-1865, kept by Annie L. Hobbs, an instructor at the New Hampshire Conference Seminary and Female College (Methodist) in Tilton, Belknap County, New Hampshire and at the Troy Conference Academy in Poultney, Rutland County, Vermont. In the diaries, Hobbs records her travels to and from her schools, evening readings, croquet games, naps, teas, Saturday excursions, her sewing work, occasional written work, receipt of letters and newspapers, Methodist festivals and Sabbath observances, and fluctuations in her health. Hobbs also regularly records her moods and her uncertainty about whether or not to go back for another term. Generally, the diaries document the life of a young female teacher living away from home, her daily routine, social contacts, and her intellectual pursuits. In the two memoranda books, Hobbs records student names and recitation periods, Lyceum lectures she attended, mathematical equations, and her expenses for 1863 to 1865.

Collection contains two manuscript pocket diaries, dated 1867 and 1869, and two pocket memoranda books, dated 1854-1855, 1859, and 1863-1865, kept by Annie L. Hobbs, an instructor at the New Hampshire Conference Seminary and Female College (Methodist) in Tilton, Belknap County, New Hampshire and at the Troy Conference Academy in Poultney, Rutland County, Vermont. In the diaries, Hobbs records her travels to and from her schools, evening readings, croquet games, naps, teas, Saturday excursions, her sewing work, occasional written work, receipt of letters and newspapers, Methodist festivals and Sabbath observances, and fluctuations in her health. Hobbs also regularly records her moods and her uncertainty about whether or not to go back for another term. Generally, the diaries document the life of a young female teacher living away from home, her daily routine, her social contacts, and her intellectual pursuits. In the two memoranda books, Hobbs records student names and recitation periods, Lyceum lectures she attended, mathematical equations, and her expenses for 1863 to 1865.

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Annie Lois Newkirk Blakely papers, 1870-1988 7.2 Linear Feet — 4,700 Items

The Annie Lois Newkirk Blakely Papers, 1870-1988, contain chiefly correspondence and diaries but also include legal papers, pictures, and clippings. The collection primarily documents the life of Blakely as a Clinton, S.C. housewife and mother, and of her children, Florence Ella Blakely and Ann Newkirk Blakely McLeod. Much of the Correspondence Series consists of personal letters by family members and friends written to Annie Lois Newkirk Blakely, her husband Ralph Royd Blakely, daughters Florence Ella Blakely (a Duke University librarian), and Ann Newkirk Blakely McLeod. A large portion of this series contain correspondence (1921-1978) between Annie and Ralph Blakely before they were married. Although the Diaries Series (1927-1978) contains primarily the journals of Annie Lois Newkirk Blakely, other family members Florence Ella Blakely and Inez Robertson Blakely, are also included. The Pictures Series contains family photographs of vacations, holidays, and weddings. The Legal Papers Series primarily contains banking and investment correspondence, as well as personal legal Items, such as Annie Blakely's discharge papers from the U.S. Army and Ralph Blakely's discharge papers from the U.S. Navy after World War I. The Miscellaneous Series includes War Ration Books from the 1940s and photocopied newspaper clippings that pertain to the Blakely and Newkirk families.

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Coleman family papers, 1895-1971 3 Linear Feet — Approx. 364 Items

Residents of Canada, Europe, and Asheville, N.C. Collection consists largely of a two-volume diary, 1895-1919, of Isabel Fleury Coleman, a twenty-three volume set of diaries, 1904-1971, belonging to Mary Augusta Coleman, and photographs of Fleury-Coleman family members and some of their residences. There are also two volumes pertaining to Mary Coleman's personal accounts and the "French Broad River Garden Club, 1967-1969," a few items of correspondence and genealogy, and a number of clippings and printed materials. Topics covered by the materials include music instruction (violin and piano), women's society life in Asheville, N.C., and women's travel in European countries during the 20th century.

Collection consists largely of a two-volume diary, 1895-1919, of Isabel Coleman, a twenty-three volume set of diaries, 1904-1971, belonging to Mary Augusta Coleman, and photographs of Fleury-Coleman family members and some of their residences. There are also two volumes pertaining to Mary Coleman's personal accounts, "French Broad River Garden Club, 1967-1969," a few items of correspondence and genealogy, and a number of clippings and printed materials. Topics covered by the materials include music clubs, instruction and performance (violin and piano) in Europe and the U.S., women's society life and fashions in Asheville, N.C., and women's travel in European countries during the 20th century. There are few comments about current events, even during the World Wars and the Depression, but there are extensive accounts of social life and customs in Europe and Asheville, N.C.

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"Stewardess" aboard the ship; resident of Grimsby[?], England Collection comprises a manuscript journal and log book (59 pgs+ blanks) authored by Thompson while on a voyage between England and Jamaica from March 25 to April 28, 1935. However, the journal actually closes with a description of her train trip home on April 29. Includes Thompson's 33 black-and-white photographs, 2 telegrams she received from a Captain Greenhill, her certificate of discharge, and an Irish sweepstakes ticket for the Derby syndicate (dated June 5) that she purchased during the voyage. In addition, Thompson copied into the journal a 3-pg informational article on bananas, written by H.C. Bower, and kept a record of the ship's log for the trip. The S.S. Tetela was a cargo and occasional passenger ship that belonged to the banana-importing firm Elders & Fyffes, a wholly owned subsidiary of the United Fruit Company.

Collection comprises a manuscript journal and log book (59 pgs+ blanks) authored by Thompson while on a voyage between England and Jamaica from March 25 to April 28, 1935. However, the journal actually closes with a description of her train trip home on April 29. Includes Thompson's 33 black-and-white photographs, 2 telegrams she received from a Captain Greenhill, her certificate of discharge, and an Irish sweepstakes ticket for the Derby syndicate (dated June 5) that she purchased during the voyage. In addition, Thompson copied into the journal a 3-pg informational article on bananas, written by H.C. Bower, and kept a record of the ship's log for the trip. The S.S. Tetela was a cargo and occasional passenger ship that belonged to the banana-importing firm Elders & Fyffes, a wholly owned subsidiary of the United Fruit Company.

All the entries in the piece indicate that Thompson was an experienced sailor and had navigational training, "Started work this morning. The ship's Log Book had been filled up last trip, and they couldn't get a new one at Rotterdam, so the entries for the last few days had been made on odd sheets of paper. I re-wrote these on official paper and.... Continued making all entries during the trip (pgs. 1-2)." The Tetela sailed from Southampton and arrived at Port Antonio, Jamaica, a fortnight later. Over the next week, the ship took on a large cargo of bananas at Montego Bay, Bowden, and Kingston, where five passengers joined the ship for the homeward voyage. The ship birthed at Garston Docks, Liverpool, two weeks later. In the journal, Thompson does not record what duties she carried out as stewardess. Instead, she recorded weather, passing ships, as well as sea life, but mainly focused on describing, with an active sense of humor, staff activities, meals, gossip, recreation, and teasing aboard ship. She also detailed a day trip she took to Port Antonio, the loading of bananas as cargo, as well as her contacts with officials of the United Fruit Company and family members of the ship's staff. The photographs document much of her description, but include several images of Thompson taken by the Tetela's captain.

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E. Ireland was a mature, unmarried Scottish woman at the time she authored a series of travel diaries from 1916 to 1920. Collection consists of five volumes (686 pages) of an illustrated travel diary kept by E. Ireland, a mature unmarried Scottish woman, between 20 August 1916 and 28 February 1920. The diaries document Ireland's travels throughout the United States, Canada, Hawaii, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, New Britain, the Philippines, Hong Kong, China, Japan, South Africa, and Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). Typical entries describe local inhabitants and customs, conversations with fellow travelers, and sites visited. Many entries include sketches, pasted in postcards, photographs, postage stamps, menus, passenger lists, and other ephemera.

Collection consists of five volumes (686 pages) of an illustrated travel diary kept by E. Ireland, a mature unmarried Scottish woman, between 20 August 1916 and 28 February 1920. The diaries document Ireland's travels throughout the United States, Canada, Hawaii, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, New Britain, the Philippines, Hong Kong, China, Japan, South Africa, and Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). Typical entries describe local inhabitants and customs, conversations with fellow travelers, and sites visited. Many entries include sketches, pasted in postcards, photographs, postage stamps, menus, passenger lists, and other ephemera.

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Elisabeth Baldwin Wiley Harris was a resident of a large plantation near Sparta, Hancock County, Georgia. The bulk of the collection consists of six volumes and fragments of a manuscript diary with daily entries from 1862 to 1893, written by Elizabeth Harris. Although there is a fragment of the diary dated 1858, the daily entries begin Jan. 4, 1862, and continue, with brief interruptions for illnesses and family crises, until Oct. 26, 1893. Harris occasionally mentions local and national politics, events connected with the Civil War, and slavery, but most of the entries concern the weather, family matters, births, deaths, illnesses, the state of her soul, and daily activities. The collection also contains one letter dated 1860, two letters dated 1957 and 1958, and a genealogy from the donor which gives background information about the author and her family.

The bulk of the collection consists of six volumes and fragments of a manuscript diary with daily entries from 1862 to 1893, written by Elizabeth Harris. Although there is a fragment of the diary dated 1858, the daily entries begin Jan. 4, 1862, and continue, with brief interruptions for illnesses and family crises, until Oct. 26, 1893. Harris occasionally mentions local and national politics, events connected with the Civil War, and slavery, but most of the entries concern the weather, family matters, births, deaths, illnesses, the state of her soul, and daily activities. The collection also contains one letter dated 1860, two letters dated 1957 and 1958, and a genealogy from the donor which gives background information about the author and her family.

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May be the author Eliza Wilson (Mrs. Robert Wilson) of Kirkdale, Liverpool, England. Entries describe the social life and travel of a British woman living in India with General Craigie, his wife, and daughters. They left England in November 1854, traveled by ship with stops in Egypt, and arrived in Madras in January 1855. The group lived in Madras but journeyed to other cities in southern India, including Bangalore, Mysore, and Vellore. There are references to the Sepoy Rebellion, 1856-1858, before Wilson departed India in 1860.

Entries describe the social life and travel of a British woman living in India with General Craigie, his wife, and daughters. They left England in November 1854, traveled by ship with stops in Egypt, and arrived in Madras in January 1855. The group lived in Madras but journeyed to other cities in southern India, including Bangalore, Mysore, and Vellore. There are references to the Sepoy Rebellion, 1856-1858, before Wilson departed India in 1860.

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Frank Baker (1910-1999) was a faculty member at Duke University in history, an expert on Wesleyan Methodism, and a rare book and manuscripts collector. The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its worldwide expansion up to the 20th century. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family. Collection also includes correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism: Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride. Other materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, photographs, and memorabilia. Topics covered by the materials include the life and training of Methodist clergy; the religious life of women; biography and portraiture of Methodists; spirituality; Protestantism in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises a vast range of original correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its expansion throughout the British Empire during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family, including Samuel Wesley, Sr. (1662-1735), Sarah (Gwynne) Wesley (1726-1822) and the Gwynne family, and the children of Charles and Sarah Wesley: Charles Wesley, Junior (1757-1834), Sarah (Sally) Wesley (1759-1828), and Samuel Wesley (1766-1837).

Additionally, correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism greatly extends the collection's breadth of coverage. Among others, these groups of correspondence include Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride.

The collection materials cover many topics, including: the life and training of clergy women correspondence and diaries; the religious life of women; biography; portraiture; spiritual topics; Protestantism as depicted in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

Formats of materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, class tickets, photographs, photocopies of original manuscripts, memorabilia, and realia.

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Chiefly consists of correspondence and genealogy pertaining to the playwright Meredith including the following families: Bliss, Billings, Dow, Grant, Meredith, Miner, Palmer, and Sanford. Correspondence includes letters from A.G. Bliss, Fannie Grant Bliss, Kate Grant Bliss, Julia Grant, and others. Also includes printed material, writings and speeches, and clippings. Contains Meredith's diary (1868, October-1881, August) which mentions the Sirosis Club, a progressive club for women which held lectures on scientific topics during the late 1870s and early 1880s. The diary also includes information about Meredith's play, "Mistress Anne: A Drama of the Seventeenth Century," (ca. 1873) is included. Meredith also wrote magazine articles under the pseudonym of "Papillon."