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Collection

James Burt Jones Jr. papers, 1893-1922 0.8 Linear Feet — 600 Items

James Burt Jones was originally from Batavia, N.Y., and served as a paymaster in the U.S. Navy during World War I. Collection consists largely of letters from women addressed to Jones during his service in World War I. Also includes a small amount of correspondence from his family and male friends, as well as a variety of photographs, invitations, and other printed material.

The James Burt Jones Jr. Papers contain correspondence addressed to Jones, who is referred to alternatively as James, Jim, Burt, and occasionally Dave. The letters date from 1906-1919, with the majority of the letters dated to 1918. The folders are arranged chronologically by month and year.

Jones, who was originally from Batavia N.Y., was a paymaster in the U.S. Navy during World War I and the letters are addressed to him while he was stationed at various locations including New York City, Washington D.C., Akron N.Y., and Erie P.A. Several letters date from his time in Ann Arbor, where he was a student at the University of Michigan. Some of the correspondence is from Jones's family and male friends, but it is primarily written by female correspondents located in Rochester N.Y., Ann Arbor, Detroit, Brooklyn, Chicago, Erie, and Buffalo N.Y. Many of these letters are from a woman named Florence, who alternatively signs as "Happy" or "Bee," a kindergarten teacher with whom Jones was romantically involved. Other letters are written by a woman named Esther, who was Jones's classmate at University of Michigan, and who provides numerous insights into the lives of female university students.

These letters express the correspondents' sorrow at Jones's departure, wishes for his safe return, questions and fears about the war, and inquiries as to his exact whereabouts and intentions. They also provide interesting insights into the politics and culture of the United States in the early twentieth century. Letters refer to the Temperance Movement (April 17, 1918), Women's Suffrage (April 17, 1918, among others), the Armistice (November 12, 1918), German-American families with sons fighting on both sides of the war (April 28, 1917), as well as to current films and other popular topics. One letter, from Jones Jr.'s father to his mother, dates from 1898. The collection also contains several photographs of the correspondents and various printed invitations to parties and dances.

The collection includes one folder of postcards, letters, birth announcements, and other small cards addressed to various other individuals apparently unrelated to Jones, many of whom are located in Batavia N.Y. This correspondence dates from approximately 1893 to 1922. Several of these letters are written by children in Los Angeles to their grandmother in N.Y.

Collection
Collection contains approximately 50 letters, largely congratulatory, mailed to Jeannette Rankin following her congressional vote opposing the United States' declaration of war on Germany in 1917. Many letters discuss women's suffrage and the desire for peace. Collection also includes assorted materials from Jeannette's lecture tours in New York, including itemized statements from a New York advertising agency and a promotional flyer. There is blank stationary letterhead from her second congressional term. Also includes two letters from Rankin's mother, Olive Pickering Rankin, to her brother, Wellington; these are undated but appear to be from approximately 1917-1920s.

Collection contains approximately 50 letters, largely congratulatory, mailed to Jeannette Rankin following her congressional vote opposing the United States' declaration of war on Germany in 1917. These letters are from strangers and non-constituents, largely women; most discuss woman's suffrage and the desire for peace, and applaud Jeannette Rankin's bravery for voting her conscience.

Collection also includes assorted materials from Rankin's lecture tours in New York, including itemized statements from a New York advertising agency in 1917, and a promotional flyer with an image of Jeannette Rankin from 1933. There is blank stationary letterhead from her second congressional term.

Finally, the collection also includes two letters from Rankin's mother, Olive Pickering Rankin, to her brother, Wellington Rankin; these are undated but appear to be from approximately 1917-1920s. Olive Rankin discusses her immense dislike of Washington D.C., and her dislike of the people (including suffragist Cornelia Swinnerton) she has met there. One quote from the August 27 (year not included in the letter, although perhaps 1917): "I stay here because I know I am needed though perhaps Jeannette would rather I would not. She has a peculiar liking for a set of New Yorkers. Miss Craft, Miss Swinnerton, and others who would run the house if I were not here. They think with a few jewels and an immense amount of flattery they can own Jeannette, but I have a prior claim. Truly Wellington if you knew the people they would disgust you especially Swinny I think of swine whenever I look at her."

Collection
Collection contains two letters Susan B. Anthony wrote on National American Woman Suffrage Association letterhead in February 1905 to Minnie C. Rodey, who was chair of the "Women's Club" in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In the letters, Anthony described informational material she will be sending Rodey, including a history of woman suffrage. In addition, she recommended a process by which the territory would vote on the issue of woman's suffrage before it acquiring statehood, since she considered the legislature and governor more likely to pass it than the general male voters in the state. She added, "... I read yesterday of the number of Indians and Mexicans and negroes that were in the territories. It is amazing that people want to make a state out of a territory composed of a majority of what we should term 'incompetents' Voting should be confined to intelligent beings." She also inquired of mutual friends and recommends her relatives who are visiting Albuquerque.

Collection contains two letters Susan B. Anthony wrote on National American Woman Suffrage Association letterhead in February 1905 to Minnie C. Rodey, who was chair of the "Women's Club" in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In the letters, Anthony described informational material she will be sending Rodey, including a history of woman suffrage. In addition, she recommended a process by which the territory would vote on the issue of woman's suffrage before it acquiring statehood, since she considered the legislature and governor more likely to pass it than the general male voters in the state. She added, "... I read yesterday of the number of Indians and Mexicans and negroes that were in the territories. It is amazing that people want to make a state out of a territory composed of a majority of what we should term 'incompetents' Voting should be confined to intelligent beings." She also inquired of mutual friends and recommends her relatives who are visiting Albuquerque. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.